Meal Preparation and Training: The Health Care Professional's Guide / Edition 1

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Overview

This book identifies and examines training techniques for the kitchen. Designed specifically for the therapist or health care professional, techniques demonstrated should be utilized by health care professionals to teach those with physical disabilities or the elderly how to understand and perform tasks in the kitchen successfully. Some issues addressed in the book include kitchen planning, meal planning, nutrition, safety, stress, and more. Materials are provided to help with kitchen and home planning. The book looks at how to deal with clients in their homes, working with children, hospice, and dealing with individuals with physical and cognitive limitations and elderly from a health care professional's perspective.

Meal Preparation and Training: The Health Care Professional's Guide is divided into several sections. Part I assesses the situation—the types of patients as well as the caregivers and family—then focuses on specific disabilities and problems including a client with arthritis, chronic pain, etc. Part II is involved with the kitchen and the home, from safety and modifications to transporting items. Part III focuses on equipment, appliances, nutrition, shopping, and includes a guide to teaching recipes. Part IV provides help for the health care professional and caregivers with extensive support materials. These include funding, agencies and organizations, sources for equipment and materials, general references, and forms and plans for making equipment. The forms and plans may be photocopied, enlarged if desired, and are designed for use with clients.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Brenda Canning, BS (Univ of Illinois at Chicago Coll of Associated Health Professions)
Description: This is a resource guide on meal preparation techniques, training, and equipment for people with disabilities. Strategies are provided for problems common to specific disabilities as well as ideas of areas to assess, tools, and extensive lists of publications for professional and consumer education. The book is to be used with the third edition of Mealtime Manual for People with Disabilities and the Aging.
Purpose: The purpose is to give recommendations for training and specific adaptations, and to provide additional references for funding and resources on meal preparation. The objectives are worthy, but may be a little too inclusive. The suggestions for training are thoughtful and considerate of the social and physical environment, but they are abbreviated in terms of content and depth. Training suggestions tend to focus mostly on adaptations in contrast to ideas to improve performance through graded activities.
Audience: The audience is healthcare professionals. In my judgment, the book is most appropriate for occupational therapists and certified occupational therapy assistants.
Features: The illustrations are an essential adjunct to the text. The instructional value of the illustrations is adequate, but some of the photographs appear dark and not clearly focused. More professional quality photographs, with some in color, would give it a more up-to-date look. The resources listed at the end of each chapter are an exceptional feature. They appear to be comprehensive and useful for therapist and patient education.
Assessment: This book would be a good reference and resource guide for occupational therapists who work with clients in a variety of settings. It will be helpful for clinicians who possess knowledge about the deficits of persons with physical disabilities to complement therapeutic intervention and provide options to solve problems.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Brenda Canning, BS (Univ of Illinois at Chicago Coll of Associated Health Professions)
Description: This is a resource guide on meal preparation techniques, training, and equipment for people with disabilities. Strategies are provided for problems common to specific disabilities as well as ideas of areas to assess, tools, and extensive lists of publications for professional and consumer education. The book is to be used with the third edition of Mealtime Manual for People with Disabilities and the Aging.
Purpose: The purpose is to give recommendations for training and specific adaptations, and to provide additional references for funding and resources on meal preparation. The objectives are worthy, but may be a little too inclusive. The suggestions for training are thoughtful and considerate of the social and physical environment, but they are abbreviated in terms of content and depth. Training suggestions tend to focus mostly on adaptations in contrast to ideas to improve performance through graded activities.
Audience: The audience is healthcare professionals. In my judgment, the book is most appropriate for occupational therapists and certified occupational therapy assistants.
Features: The illustrations are an essential adjunct to the text. The instructional value of the illustrations is adequate, but some of the photographs appear dark and not clearly focused. More professional quality photographs, with some in color, would give it a more up-to-date look. The resources listed at the end of each chapter are an exceptional feature. They appear to be comprehensive and useful for therapist and patient education.
Assessment: This book would be a good reference and resource guide for occupational therapists who work with clients in a variety of settings. It will be helpful for clinicians who possess knowledge about the deficits of persons with physical disabilities to complement therapeutic intervention and provide options to solve problems.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Brenda Canning, BS(Univ of Illinois at Chicago Coll of Associated Health Professions)
Description: This is a resource guide on meal preparation techniques, training, and equipment for people with disabilities. Strategies are provided for problems common to specific disabilities as well as ideas of areas to assess, tools, and extensive lists of publications for professional and consumer education. The book is to be used with the third edition of Mealtime Manual for People with Disabilities and the Aging.
Purpose: The purpose is to give recommendations for training and specific adaptations, and to provide additional references for funding and resources on meal preparation. The objectives are worthy, but may be a little too inclusive. The suggestions for training are thoughtful and considerate of the social and physical environment, but they are abbreviated in terms of content and depth. Training suggestions tend to focus mostly on adaptations in contrast to ideas to improve performance through graded activities.
Audience: The audience is healthcare professionals. In my judgment, the book is most appropriate for occupational therapists and certified occupational therapy assistants.
Features: The illustrations are an essential adjunct to the text. The instructional value of the illustrations is adequate, but some of the photographs appear dark and not clearly focused. More professional quality photographs, with some in color, would give it a more up-to-date look. The resources listed at the end of each chapter are an exceptional feature. They appear to be comprehensive and useful for therapist and patient education.
Assessment: This book would be a good reference and resource guide for occupational therapists who work with clients in a variety of settings. It will be helpful for clinicians who possess knowledge about the deficits of persons with physical disabilities to complement therapeutic intervention and provide options to solve problems.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Brenda Canning, BS(Univ of Illinois at Chicago Coll of Associated Health Professions)
Description: This is a resource guide on meal preparation techniques, training, and equipment for people with disabilities. Strategies are provided for problems common to specific disabilities as well as ideas of areas to assess, tools, and extensive lists of publications for professional and consumer education. The book is to be used with the third edition of Mealtime Manual for People with Disabilities and the Aging.
Purpose: The purpose is to give recommendations for training and specific adaptations, and to provide additional references for funding and resources on meal preparation. The objectives are worthy, but may be a little too inclusive. The suggestions for training are thoughtful and considerate of the social and physical environment, but they are abbreviated in terms of content and depth. Training suggestions tend to focus mostly on adaptations in contrast to ideas to improve performance through graded activities.
Audience: The audience is healthcare professionals. In my judgment, the book is most appropriate for occupational therapists and certified occupational therapy assistants.
Features: The illustrations are an essential adjunct to the text. The instructional value of the illustrations is adequate, but some of the photographs appear dark and not clearly focused. More professional quality photographs, with some in color, would give it a more up-to-date look. The resources listed at the end of each chapter are an exceptional feature. They appear to be comprehensive and useful for therapist and patient education.
Assessment: This book would be a good reference and resource guide for occupational therapists who work with clients in a variety of settings. It will be helpful for clinicians who possess knowledge about the deficits of persons with physical disabilities to complement therapeutic intervention and provide options to solve problems.
Brenda Canning
This is a resource guide on meal preparation techniques, training, and equipment for people with disabilities. Strategies are provided for problems common to specific disabilities as well as ideas of areas to assess, tools, and extensive lists of publications for professional and consumer education. The book is to be used with the third edition of Mealtime Manual for People with Disabilities and the Aging. The purpose is to give recommendations for training and specific adaptations, and to provide additional references for funding and resources on meal preparation. The objectives are worthy, but may be a little too inclusive. The suggestions for training are thoughtful and considerate of the social and physical environment, but they are abbreviated in terms of content and depth. Training suggestions tend to focus mostly on adaptations in contrast to ideas to improve performance through graded activities. The audience is healthcare professionals. In my judgment, the book is most appropriate for occupational therapists and certified occupational therapy assistants. The illustrations are an essential adjunct to the text. The instructional value of the illustrations is adequate, but some of the photographs appear dark and not clearly focused. More professional quality photographs, with some in color, would give it a more up-to-date look. The resources listed at the end of each chapter are an exceptional feature. They appear to be comprehensive and useful for therapist and patient education. This book would be a good reference and resource guide for occupational therapists who work with clients in a variety of settings. It will be helpful for clinicians whopossess knowledge about the deficits of persons with physical disabilities to complement therapeutic intervention and provide options to solve problems.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556423437
  • Publisher: SLACK, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/1997
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 8.58 (w) x 11.16 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Table of Contents

Dedication and Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction
How to Find What You Need
1 The Older Client 3
2 The Parent Who Has a Disability and the Younger Client 11
3 The Client Who Lives Alone 19
4 The Client with Eating Difficulties 23
5 The Client Who is Receiving Hospice Care 31
6 The Caregiver and the Family 37
7 Stress-Reduction Techniques 45
8 The Client Who Uses One Hand or Has Had a Stroke 49
9 The Client with Upper Extremity Weakness 55
10 The Client with Arthritis 63
11 The Client with Incoordination 69
12 The Client Who Has an Amputation 75
13 The Client Who Requires an Ambulation Aid 79
14 The Client with Back Pain or Chronic Pain 87
15 The Client with Loss of Sensation 91
16 The Client Who Uses a Wheelchair 93
17 The Client Who Has Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 103
18 The Client with Complete or Partial Loss of Vision 105
19 The Client with Lowered Energy Levels 113
20 The Client with Hearing Loss 117
21 The Client with Developmental Delay 121
22 The Client with Traumatic Brain Injury 125
23 The Client Who Has Cancer 129
24 Safety in the Home 135
25 Kitchen Planning, Storage, and Home Modifications 141
26 Transporting Food and Equipment 157
27 Selecting Equipment and Appliances 163
28 Teaching About Microwave Cooking 171
29 Teaching About Nutrition and Meal Planning 175
30 Teaching About Shopping 185
31 Teaching Recipes 195
App. A Funding and Resources for Home Management Training, Equipment, and Home Modifications 201
App. B Assessment and Evaluation Forms 207
App. C Helpful Organizations and Agencies 223
App. D Periodicals 253
App. E Sources for Equipment and Materials 257
App. F General References 285
App. G Forms and Plans for Making Equipment 289
Index 315
Tear-out Suggestion Card 323
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