Mean Streets

Mean Streets

3.9 70
by Jim Butcher, Simon R. Green, Thomas E. Sniegoski, Kat Richardson
     
 

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View our feature on Mean Streets. An anthology of "solid and suspenseful" novellas from

#1 New York Times bestselling author
Jim Butcher

New York Times bestselling author
Simon R. Green

National bestselling authors
Kat Richardson
Thomas E. Sniegoski

Here are four novellas featuring Harry Dresden, John

…  See more details below

Overview

View our feature on Mean Streets. An anthology of "solid and suspenseful" novellas from

#1 New York Times bestselling author
Jim Butcher

New York Times bestselling author
Simon R. Green

National bestselling authors
Kat Richardson
Thomas E. Sniegoski

Here are four novellas featuring Harry Dresden, John Taylor, Harper Blaine, and Remy Chandler...paranormal private investigators who walk the streets no one else can walk and take the jobs no one else will take...

Of course, if a case involves werewolves, zombies, demons, or other "unusual" circumstances, it may cost a bit extra.

Editorial Reviews

Read that author list again: This paperback original collection features original novellas by four of the hottest urban fantasy authors alive. And it doesn't stop there. Patrolling this anthology's mean streets are some of the sharpest paranormal private investigators in the business: Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden; Simon R. Green's Nightside stalker John Taylor; Kat Richardson's savvy Greywalker; and Thomas Sniegoski's fallen angel/detective Remy Chandler.
Publishers Weekly

Readers will be delighted with this collection of original novellas tied to popular crime/fantasy series. The standout is Sniegoski's "Noah's Orphans," in which angel PI Remy Chandler must solve the murder of the biblical Ark's builder, whose battered corpse is found on an abandoned oil rig. Sniegoski manages to make a far-fetched setup both plausible and moving. Butcher's "The Warrior" hints at a mysterious ongoing war, while wizard detective Harry Dresden solves a case with typical dry wit. Green employs darker humor in "The Difference a Day Makes," in which PI John Taylor assists a woman who wandered into the dark world hidden within London, while Richardson's "The Third Death of the Little Clay Dog" neatly merges noir conventions with a fantastical plot. All solid and suspenseful, these stories are sure to please. (Jan.)

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Library Journal

From Butcher's story of a Chicago wizard involved in protecting a holy sword and the man who once wielded it ("The Warrior") to Thomas Sniegoski's recounting of fallen angel Remy Chandler's involvement in discovering who killed Noah ("Noah's Orphans"), and contributions from Kat Richardson and Simon R. Green, this four-novella collection features detectives who plumb the supernatural in pursuit of their goals. A good introduction to novels that delve deeper into their featured characters by these top urban fantasy authors, this volume belongs in most fantasy/mystery collections.


—Jackie Cassada

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451463067
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/05/2010
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
500,151
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 7.20(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

A martial arts enthusiast whose resume includes a long list of skills rendered obsolete at least two hundred years ago, Jim Butcher turned to writing as a career because anything else probably would have driven him insane. He lives with his wife, his son and a ferocious guard dog.
Kat Richardson lives on a sailboat in Seattle with her husband, a crotchety old cat, and two ferrets. She rides a motorcycle, shoots target pistol, and does not own a TV.

Simon R. Green is a New York Times bestselling author whose works include Drinking Midnight Wine, Beyond the Blue Moon, Blue Moon Rising, The Adventures of Hawk & Fisher, and the Deathstalker series. A resident of Bradford-on-Avon in England, he is currently working on the next Deathstalker novel.

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Mean Streets 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 70 reviews.
MizBehavin1 More than 1 year ago
No surprise that I thoroughly enjoyed Jim Butcher's short story "The Warrior". A fast-paced tale, centering on Michael Carpenter, his family, and his connections within the church many months after the events in 'Small Favor'. One of the reasons why I enjoy Butcher's stories is that his novels are filled with character development and lots of action. We don't get 3+ pages of unnecessary description about the scene, and if the description goes on for more than a paragraph, it's because it's important to the characters or the scene itself. This is also why his novels are so tough to put down once started. I also easily fell into Kat Richardson's Harper Blaine story "The Third Death of the Little Clay Dog". A 'Greywalker' story centered around a third party client's bequest in their will to place a clay dog statue on someone's grave during the Day of the Dead celebration in Oaxaca, Mexico. I found the mystery to be intriguing and the characters engaging. So much so, in fact, that I read the first 3 novels of the 'Greywalker' series immediately after finishing two other books I was reading at the time. I also put myself on the waiting list as soon as her 4th installment was available at the library, and will do so again when #5 'Labyrinth' comes out in August 2010. To a lesser degree, I enjoyed Thomas Sneigoski's 'Remy Chandler' short story "Noah's Orphans" -- particularly his conversations with his Black Lab Marlowe (who reminded me of Shadow, the dog I grew up with). The story was well-written, interesting, and I liked Remy & Marlowe, but the battling of fallen angels and tracking of Noah's killer is just not interesting subject matter for me. It is rare that every story in an anthology speaks to the reader. "Mean Streets" does pretty well in that I enjoyed 3 of the 4 stories presented. The final short story "The Difference A Day Makes" by Simon R. Green was the dud for me. John Taylor is a private investigator in The Nightside ("the longest night in the world, where the sun has never shone and never will") where anything dark, sick & twisted that can be imagined can be found. Taylor is a paranormal version of the hardboiled detective Philip Marlowe with the dialogue sounding exactly like Humphrey Bogart's characterization. I never connected with any of the characters, and the mystery was unappealing to me. Way too formulaic in style and plot, and too much overblown description about things I could care less about. I found the story to be boring and trite, and it was a struggle to read the entire tale and not just stop reading after the first chapter.
Jsh_the_Bard More than 1 year ago
This collection makes it easy to get a brief glimpse into the worlds of four different characters. Personally, I bought it to read about Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden. What I found was a book that had three other lead characters with great appeal. I recommend it to those who like a bit of magic/arcane in their mystery.
sheila-mwm More than 1 year ago
Each story was unique, dramatic and a quick read. I could not put this book down, each story was amazing. If you enjoy stories about supernatural characters with a strong plot and likeable characters this is the book for you. If you have a short attention span, even better because each story is action packed and flies by quickly.
harstan More than 1 year ago
¿The Warrior¿ by Jim Butcher. Harry Dresden knows he has faced some death defying strange cases, but fears this time with the Michael scenario he may not make it out even dead let alone alive.
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¿The Difference a Day Makes¿ by Simon R. Green. In the Nightside, the femme fatale enters the private investigative office of John Taylor to obviously hire him. However, her request is off the chart, which says a lot with what the detective has seen and done; she needs John to find her lost memory.
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¿The Third Death of the Little Clay Dog¿ by Kat Richardson. The case was expected to be easy and fast so the Greywalker wonders why she is in such dire straits as nothing went right starting with the attacks from the grave of the raging vengeful late Harper Blaine
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¿Noah¿s Orphans¿ by Thomas E. Sniegoski. He is hired to uncover who killed the centuries old Noah; for a fallen angel like Remy Chandler the case seems simple, but he will soon learn once again as he did when he fell from grace that there is nothing straightforward under heaven and earth.
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These four paranormal urban fantasy noirs occur in the author¿s renowned ¿world¿ starring ultra famous lead characters. Each tale is well written feeling complete even in the novella format and complement one another as the writers rose to the occasion of expectations from their fan base. An obvious must for readers of any of the four paranormal sagas, newcomers will appreciate the introductions to these literary legends as they investigate the otherworldly MEAN STREETS.

Harriet Klausner
cheliebe More than 1 year ago
This is a great collection of short stories. I was familiar with some of the writers and enjoyed their latest shorts. The rest of the writers in this collection were new to me and I'm looking forward to finding other books by them. Kat Richardson continues the tales of GreyWalker series and it is fun. Thomas Sniegoski presents a chilling future where one's desires can be met at any price. Overall I read these stories and was really entertained.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A collection of stories by a group of authors that I recommend checking out. This book gives a taste of each of these authors main characters and I think, after reading this, many will want to see more.
jjmachshev More than 1 year ago
Urban fantasy fans, pay heed! "Mean Streets" is an awesome anthology with stories by four big-hitters of the genre. In one book, you can visit with Chicago wizard Harry Dresden, Nightside PI John Taylor, Greywalker Harper Blaine, and fallen angel Remy Chandler in their own worlds. Stories of murder and attempted murder most foul, but with magic added to the mayhem.

For those who are unfamiliar with the above names, they are the creations of Jim Butcher, Simon R. Green, Kat Richardson, and Thomas E. Sniegoski. This anthology gives you a chance to get a feel for each writer's style and characters and it's hard for me to believe that you won't find at least one (and likely all four) to your tastes.
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