Means of Escape: A War Correspondent's Memoir of Life and Death in Afghanistan, the Middle East, and Vietnam

Means of Escape: A War Correspondent's Memoir of Life and Death in Afghanistan, the Middle East, and Vietnam

4.5 2
by Philip Caputo
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"A riveting memoir of years of living dangerously."—Kirkus Reviews

For the countless readers who have admired Philip Caputo's classic memoir of Vietnam, A Rumor of War, here is his powerful recounting of his life and adventures, updated with a foreword that assesses the state of the world and the journalist's art.

As a

Overview

"A riveting memoir of years of living dangerously."—Kirkus Reviews

For the countless readers who have admired Philip Caputo's classic memoir of Vietnam, A Rumor of War, here is his powerful recounting of his life and adventures, updated with a foreword that assesses the state of the world and the journalist's art.

As a journalist, Caputo has covered many of the world's troubles, and in Means of Escape, he tells the reader in moving and clear-eyed prose how he made himself into a writer, traveler, and observer with the nerve to put himself at the center of the world's conflicts. As a young reporter he investigated the Mafia in Chicago, earning acclaim as well as threats against his safety. Later, he rode camels through the desert and enjoyed Bedouin hospitality, was kidnapped and held captive by Islamic extremists, and was targeted and hit by sniper fire in Beirut, with memories of Vietnam never far from the surface. And after it all, he went into Afghanistan. Caputo's goal has always been to bear witness to the crimes, ambitions, fears, ferocities, and hopes of humanity. With Means of Escape, he has done so.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
An intensely personal, albeit consistently affecting and frequently riveting memoir of years of living dangerously. Caputo (A Rumor of War, Indian Country, etc.) has witnessed much of the worst violence that marked the latter half of the 20th century. A combat veteran of Vietnam, he went on to cover trouble spots throughout the Third World as a roving correspondent for The Chicago Tribune. Describing himself as drawn to history (if not to the sound of the guns), the globe-trotting author has reported on insurgency in Eritrea, civil strife in Lebanon, Israel's October War, the fall of Saigon, and a host of lesser belligerencies. Looking for a "good war" several years after having quit the journalism trade, Caputo accepted an assignment from Esquire that took him deep behind Soviet lines in Afghanistan. Venturesome to the point of rashness, he has paid the price of boldness on many occasions. Though he made it through Vietnam without a physical scratch, for example, the author was imprisoned by Palestinian guerrillas in Beirut and later sustained severe wounds (at the hands of Christian militia) in the same city, leaving him with a still-painful limp. Peacefully settled in one place now, he's content to let a workroom window overlooking a salt marsh on the Long Island Sound serve as his new means of escape. Caputo nonetheless looks back on his days as a rolling stone with some relish and few apparent regrets. Indeed, he retains a rueful sense of barracks humor neatly summarized in an ultrarude anecdote whose moral is: "the final indignity is that there is no final indignity." An episodic, impressionistic, and dead-honest narrative that affords memorable as well as consequentialinsights into a chaotic era's noteworthy conflicts.

From the Publisher

“An episodic, impressionistic, and dead-honest narrative that affords memorable as well as consequential insights into a chaotic era's noteworthy conflicts.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This is, make no mistake about it, a startlingly honest and brutal book....The writing is suberb. Highly recommended for all.” —Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429921848
Publisher:
Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
03/31/2009
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
695,970
File size:
441 KB

Meet the Author

Philip Caputo is the author of the New York Times bestseller A Rumor of War and the novels Indian Country, DelCorso's Gallery, and Horn of Africa. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972 as part of an investigative team for the Chicago Tribune, and his coverage of his experience as a captive of Palestinian guerrillas won him the Overseas Press Club's George Polk Citation.


Philip Caputo is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including A Rumor of War, one of the most highly praised books of the twentieth century. His novels include Acts of Faith, The Voyage, Horn of Africa, and Crossers. He and his wife, Leslie Ware, divide their time between Norwalk, Connecticut, and Patagonia, Arizona.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Means of Escape: A War Correspondent's Memoir of Life and Death in Afghanistan, the Middle East, and Vietnam 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the 3rd Phil Caputo book I've read. The 1st one of his I read was a fictional account of a war correspondent ("DelCorso's Gallery"). Reading it, I thought, "There's no way this could've been either made up or converted from interviews of actual war correspondents." An internet search enlightened me to Caputo's career as a war correspondent and to this book. As for the story, it's riveting! He saw almost more danger and action as a reporter in combat than he did as a Marine infantry officer in combat. Definitely a great read for the action-oriented reader. He also imparts some interesting details about the politics of each conflict he's covered that could be very beneficial to those doing research on them. As for the writing, Caputo's cynical wit cracks me up. Not only that but he winds his stories almost around one another and reflects on others in the midst of each to where the reader almost feels like Caputo's sitting there telling you his stories in person. Bottom line; this book is a great read and I'd highly recommend it.