Measuring the User Experience: Collecting, Analyzing, and Presenting Usability Metrics / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $38.98
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 33%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $38.98   
  • New (1) from $49.95   
  • Used (2) from $38.98   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$49.95
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(795)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New CURL*

Ships from: Astoria, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Effectively measuring the usability and user experience of any product requires choosing the right metric, applying it, and using the information it reveals. This completely new and updated edition of Measuring the User Experience provides a single source of practical information to enable user experience professionals and product developers to do just that. Authors Tullis and Albert organize dozens of metrics into five categories: performance, issues-based, self-reported, derived, and behavioral/physiological. You’ll explore each metric and learn the best methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting the data. You’ll find step-by-step guidance for measuring the user experience of any type of product using any type of technology.

New to this edition, you’ll find such topics as measuring emotional engagement, personas, and the Net Promoter Score. The book also contains new research and updated examples, including tips on writing online survey questions, six new case studies, and much more!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"If Tom and Bill could convince me, perhaps the world’s biggest fan of qualitative testing, that usability metrics are really valuable-which they have, in this wonderful book-then there’s no doubt they’ll convince you. I loved reading this book, because it was exactly like having a fascinating conversation with a very smart, very seasoned, and very articulate practitioner. They tell you everything you need to know (and no more) about all the most useful usability metrics, explain the pros and cons of each one (with remarkable clarity and economy), and then reveal exactly how they actually use them after years and years of real world experience. Invaluable!" Steve Krug, author of Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability "This book is a great resource about the many ways you can gather usability metrics without busting your budget. If you’re ready to take your user experience career to the next level of professionalism, Tullis and Albert are here for you and share generously of their vast experience. Highly recommended." Jakob Nielsen, Principal, Nielsen Norman Group, author of Usability Engineering and Eyetracking Web Usability "If you do any type of usability testing, you need this book. Tullis and Albert have written a clear and comprehensive guide with a common-sense approach to usability metrics." Ginny Redish, President of Redish and Associates, Inc., author of Letting Go of the Words

"The book is well-structured for the practitioner…. It is a real pleasure to encounter a book that not only takes the reader on a journey through the rich possibilities of technique, but does so in a a manner that is clear, readable, and accessible. I was particularly pleased with the simple explanations of statistical techniques, which are so often presented as incomprehensible…. Whether you’ve conducted remote studies in the past and want to extend your capability and knowledge, or if you are a complete newcomer, this excellent book is a necessary companion on your journey from the lab into the outside world. You will refer to it often, and it will alert you to opportunities and dangers. What more could you ask of a book?" Gerry Gaffney, User Experience, Vol 10, Issue 2, 2nd Quarter, 2011

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780123735584
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 3/17/2008
  • Series: Interactive Technologies Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill Albert is Director of the Design and Usability Center at Bentley University. Prior to joining Bentley, Bill was Director of User Experience at Fidelity Investments, Senior User Interface Researcher at Lycos, and Post-Doctoral Research Scientist at Nissan Cambridge Basic Research. Bill is an Adjunct Professor in Human Factors in Information Design at Bentley University and a frequent instructor at the International Usability Professional’s Association Annual Conference. Bill has published and presented his research at more than thirty national and international conferences. He is coauthor (with Tom Tullis) of Measuring the User Experience and Beyond the Usability Lab. He is on the editorial board for the Journal of Usability Studies.

Tom Tullis is Vice President of Usability and User Insight at Fidelity Investments and Adjunct Professor at Bentley University in the Human Factors in Information Design program. He joined Fidelity in 1993 and was instrumental in the development of the company’s usability department, including a state-of-the-art Usability Lab. Prior to joining Fidelity, he held positions at Canon Information Systems, McDonnell Douglas, Unisys Corporation, and Bell Laboratories. He and Fidelity’s usability team have been featured in a number of publications, including Newsweek , Business 2.0 , Money , The Boston Globe , The Wall Street Journal , and The New York Times.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Measuring the User Experience

Collecting, Analyzing, and Presenting Usability Metrics
By Tom Tullis Bill Albert

MORGAN KAUFMANN PUBLISHERS

Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Inc.
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-08-055826-4


Chapter One

Introduction

The goal of this book is to show how usability metrics can be a powerful tool for successfully evaluating the user experience for any product. When some people think about usability metrics, they feel overwhelmed by complicated formulas, contradictory research, and advanced statistical methods. We hope to demystify much of the research and focus on the practical application of usability metrics. We'll walk you through a step-by-step approach to collecting, analyzing, and presenting usability metrics. We'll help you choose the right metrics for each situation or application, and show you how to use them to produce reliable, actionable results without breaking your budget. We'll give you guidelines and tips for analyzing a wide range of usability metrics and provide many different examples of how to present usability metrics to others in simple and effective ways.

Our intention is to make this book a practical, how-to guide about measuring the usability of any product. We aren't going to give you a lot of formulas; in fact, there are very few. The statistics will be fairly limited, and the calculations can be done easily in Excel or some other common software package or web application. Our goal is to give you the tools you need to evaluate the usability of any product, without overwhelming you with unnecessary details.

This book is both product- and technology-neutral. The usability metrics we describe can be used for practically any type of product and any type of technology. This is one of the great features of usability metrics: They aren't just for websites or any single technology. For example, task success and satisfaction are equally valid whether you evaluate a website, a treadmill, or a toaster. More advanced technologies, such as websites, mobile phones, software, and consumer electronics, are of special concern because they're generally more complicated, but the basic premise remains the same.

The "half-life" of usability metrics is much greater than any specific design or technology. Despite all the changes in technology, the metrics essentially stay the same. Some metrics may change with the development of new technologies to measure usability, but the underlying phenomena being measured don't change. where exactly a user is looking on the screen. Now, with the latest advances in eye-tracking technology, measurement has become much easier and far more accurate.

So why did we write this book? There's certainly no shortage of books on human factors, statistics, experimental design, and usability methods. Some of those books even cover the more common usability metrics. Does a book that focuses entirely on usability metrics even make sense? Obviously, we think so. In our (humble) opinion, this book makes five unique contributions to the realm of usability publications:

* We take a comprehensive look at usability metrics. No other books review so many different usability metrics. We provide details on collecting, analyzing, and presenting nearly every type of usability metric you could possibly use.

* This book takes a practical approach. We assume you're interested in applying usability metrics as part of your job. We don't waste your time with unnecessary details. We want you to be able to use these metrics easily every day. If you're interested in the theoretical side, we point you to additional resources.

* We provide help in making the right decisions about usability metrics. One of the most difficult aspects of a usability professional's job is deciding whether to collect metrics and, if so, which ones to use. We guide you through the decision process so that you find the right metrics for your situation.

* We provide many examples of how usability metrics have been applied within different organizations and how they have been used to address specific usability questions. We also provide in-depth case studies to help you determine how best to use the information revealed by the usability metrics.

* We present usability metrics that can be used with any product or technology. We take a broad view so that these usability metrics can be helpful throughout your career even as technology and products change.

1.1 ORGANIZATION OF THIS BOOK

This book is organized into three main parts. The first one (Chapters 1–3) provides background information needed to get up to speed on usability metrics. This part is intended for those who are less familiar with usability, data analysis, or statistics.

* Chapter 1 provides an overview of usability and usability metrics. We define user experience, usability, and different types of usability metrics; discuss the value of measuring the user experience; and dispel some of the common myths about usability metrics.

* Chapter 2 includes background information on usability data and some basic statistical concepts. We walk you through a step-by-step process to set up a usability study using different metrics and provide a guide for performing common statistical procedures related to different usability methods.

* Chapter 3 focuses on planning a usability study, including defining participant goals and study goals and choosing the right metrics for a wide variety of situations.

The second part (Chapters 4–9) reviews five general types of usability metrics, as well as some special topics that don't fall neatly into any single type. For each metric, we explain what it is, when to use it, and when not to use it. We show you how to collect the data and different ways to analyze and present it. We provide examples of how it has been used in real-world usability studies.

* Chapter 4 covers various types of performance metrics, including task success, time on task, errors, efficiency, and ease of learning. These metrics are grouped under an "umbrella" of performance because they measure different aspects of the user's behavior.

* Chapter 5 looks at measuring usability issues. Usability issues can easily be quantified by measuring the frequency, severity, and type of issue. We also discuss some of the debates about appropriate sample sizes and how to capture usability issues reliably.

* Chapter 6 focuses on self-reported metrics, such as satisfaction, expectations, ease-of-use ratings, usefulness, and awareness. Self-reported metrics are based on what users share about their experiences, not what the usability specialist measures about their actual behaviors.

* Chapter 7 is devoted to behavioral and physiological metrics. These metrics include eye-tracking, facial expressions, and various measures of stress. All of these metrics capture something about how the body behaves as a result of the experience of working with a user interface.

* Chapter 8 discusses how to combine different types of metrics and derive new metrics. Sometimes it's helpful to get an overall assessment of the usability of any product. This global assessment is achieved by combining different types of metrics into a single usability score, summarizing them in a usability scorecard, or comparing them to expert performance.

* Chapter 9 presents special topics that we believe are important but that don't fit squarely into one of the five general categories. These include A/B testing on a live website, card-sorting data, Six Sigma, accessibility data, and return on investment (ROI).

The third part (Chapters 10–11) shows how usability metrics are put into practice. In this part, we highlight how usability metrics are actually used within different types of organizations and how to promote the use of metrics within an organization.

* Chapter 10 presents six case studies. Each case study reviews how different types of usability metrics were used, how the data were collected and analyzed, and the results. These case studies were drawn from usability practitioners in various types of organizations, including consulting, government, industry, and not-for-profit/education.

* Chapter 11 provides ten steps to help you move forward in using metrics within your organization. We discuss how usability metrics can fit within different types of organizations, practical tips for making metrics work within your organization, and recipes for success.

1.2 WHAT IS USABILITY?

Before we try to measure usability, we should know what it is and what it isn't. There are many definitions of usability—maybe even one for every person involved in the field! We're going to focus on three definitions.

The International Standards Organization (ISO 9241-11) identifies three aspects of usability, defining it as "the extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use."

The Usability Professionals Association (UPA) definition focuses more on the product development process: "Usability is an approach to product development that incorporates direct user feedback throughout the development cycle in order to reduce costs and create products and tools that meet user needs."

In his popular book Don't Make Me Think, Steve Krug (2000) provides a simple perspective: "Usability really just means making sure that something works well: that a person of average (or even below average) ability and experience can use the thing—whether it's a website, a fighter jet, or a revolving door—for its intended purpose without getting hopelessly frustrated."

All three of these definitions, as well as other definitions of usability, share some common themes:

* A user is involved.

* That user is doing something.

* That user is doing something with a product, system, or other thing.

Some people distinguish between the terms usability and user experience. Usability is usually considered the ability of the user to use the thing to carry out a task successfully, whereas user experience takes a broader view, looking at the individual's entire interaction with the thing, as well as the thoughts, feelings, and perceptions that result from that interaction. We take a very broad view of usability and examine the entire user experience. Therefore, when we talk about "measuring usability," we're really looking at the entire user experience.

1.3 WHY DOES USABILITY MATTER?

In any casual conversation about usability, most people would agree that it's good to have something that works well and isn't confusing to use. In our years of evaluating products with thousands of test participants, no one has ever complained that something was too easy to use! Everyone has some favorite stories about how something works remarkably well or really terribly. Even as we write this book, we're challenged in formatting the manuscript to give it to the publisher in an acceptable format. Many other stories demonstrate that the usability of something can actually save lives, bankrupt businesses, and have a tremendous impact on society at large.

Usability can sometimes mean the difference between life and death. For example, the health industry is not immune to poor usability. Usability issues abound in medical devices, procedures, and even diagnostic tools. Jakob Nielsen (2005) cites one study that found 22 separate usability issues that contributed to patients receiving the wrong medicine. Similar situations can arise on a regular basis in the workplace or in the home. Just think of the written instructions for such actions as lighting the pilot light on a furnace or installing a new lighting fixture. An instruction that's misunderstood or misread can easily result in property damage, personal injury, or even death. Similar situations arise outside the home: confusing street signs, complicated or poorly designed automobile dashboards, or distracting devices such as vehicle navigation systems or even cell phones.

Sadly, one of the factors involved in a fatal accident on March 2, 2007, in Atlanta, Georgia, may have been poor usability of the high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane and its associated signage (see Figure 1.1). A charter bus was carrying the Bluffton University baseball team to their first playoff game in Sarasota, Florida. The bus was driving south in the predawn hours (when it was still dark) on I-75 in the HOV lane, when the driver, who was not from the area, was faced with the signs in Figure 1.1.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Measuring the User Experience by Tom Tullis Bill Albert Copyright © 2008 by Elsevier Inc.. Excerpted by permission of MORGAN KAUFMANN PUBLISHERS. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Background Chapter 3 Planning Chapter 4 Performance Metrics Chapter 5 Issue-Based Metrics Chapter 6 Self-Reported Metrics Chapter 7 Behavioral and Physiological Metrics Chapter 8 Combined and Comparative Metrics Chapter 9 Special Topics Chapter 10 Case Studies Chapter 11 Ten Keys to Success

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)