Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing Out of Sync?

Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing Out of Sync?

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by Seth Godin
     
 

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'Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don't care, as long as it's shiny and new.'

Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make

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Overview

'Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don't care, as long as it's shiny and new.'

Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make it taste great. But if you start with a bowl of meatballs . . . yuck!

As traditional marketing fades away, the new tools seem irresistible. But they don't work as well for boring brands ('meatballs') that might still be profitable but don't attract word of mouth, such as Cheerios, Ford trucks, Barbie dolls, or Budweiser. When Anheuser-Busch spends $40 million on an online network called BudTV, that's a meatball sundae. It leads to no new Bud drinkers, just a bad case of indigestion.

Meatball Sundae is the definitive guide to the fourteen trends no marketer can afford to ignore. It explains what to do about the increasing power of stories, not facts; about shorter and shorter attention spans; and about the new math that says five thousand people who want to hear your message are more valuable than five million who don't.

The winners aren't just annoying start-ups run by three teenagers who never had a real job. You-ll also meet older companies that have adapted brilliantly, such as Blendtec, a thirty-year-old blender maker. It now produces 'Will it blend'? videos that demolish golf balls, Coke cans, iPhones, and much more. For a few hundred dollars, Blendtec reached more than ten million eager viewers on YouTube.

Godin doesn't pretend that it's easy to get your products, marketing messages, and internal systems in sync. But he'll convince you that it's worth the effort.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Godin's latest business handbook (after Small Is the New Bigand The Dip) revisits some of his most popular marketing advice, while emphasizing that it can't just be applied willy-nilly. In past decades, he says, companies were able to get rich by making "average products for average people," but those markets have long since been sewn up; "mass is no longer achievable [or] desirable." Rather than simply rely on mass media to raise product visibility, "New Marketing" treats every aspect of interacting with customers-including customer service and the product itself-as an opportunity to "grow the organization." In order to be successful with such marketing techniques, a company must change its practices across the board. Otherwise, you're just putting whipped cream on a meatball. Godin has a perspective on everything from blogs (don't bother unless you really have something to say) to the long tail (if it's as valuable to your company as the top sellers are, why aren't you paying more attention?). His arresting conversational style is sure to once again set the business world talking. (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Miami Herald
"Godin…is a clear-eyed visionary with strong and sensible ideas on how the new economy can, should and will function."—Miami Herald

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591841746
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
12/27/2007
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.34(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Seth Godin is an entrepreneur, a sought-after lecturer, a monthly columnist for Fast Company, and an all-around business gadfly. He’s the bestselling author of Permission Marketing, Unleashing the Ideavirus, The Big Red Fez, Survival Is Not Enough, and Purple Cow.

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Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing Out of Sync? 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
jrsedivy More than 1 year ago
If you are, or planning to, market your product or service on the Internet you have to read this book. Seth Godin is a genius with coming up with memorable analogies, and "Meatball Sundae" is no exception. There are also some great examples here to back up these concepts - which are reinforced sufficiently to have staying power. I have to say that I enjoyed this book much more than "Tribes," however having read "Meatball Sundae" it has given me a deeper appreciation for "Tribes." There are some great concepts in this book with some equally great examples to reinforce these concepts. Although some visuals would have been welcomed, the content is strong enough to stand on it's own. Highly recommended. For a more in-depth review refer to my blog article: "Meatball Sundae Book Review" located at: http://capecodbranding.com/blog/2009/07/31/meatball-sundae-book-review/
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
The title of Seth Godin's new book is an immediate tip-off that he knows how to grab your attention. This savvy marketer satiates your curiosity quickly, explaining that simply adding "New Marketing" techniques, such as podcasting or uploading viral videos, to your existing strategies works just about as well as adding meatballs to a sundae. The "meatball" in this case is a generic product sold through traditional mass-marketing tactics. Instead of adding new marketing like a cherry on top of your current ad program, gain a true understanding of today's evolving social marketing environment, so you can use it to the advantage of your product. Godin says companies must retool their marketing to survive, because "ideas that spread through groups of people are far more powerful than ideas delivered at an individual." He breaks the new marketing wave into 14 trends marketers can use separately or in combination. getAbstract recommends this timely little book, which is full of case studies and examples that will help anyone who is selling an idea, product or service.