Meatless Days / Edition 2

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Overview

"Nine autobiographical tales that move easily back and forth among Pakistan, Britain, and the United States. . . . She forays lightly into Pakistani history, and deeply into the history of her family and friends. . . . The Suleri women at home in Pakistan make this book sing."-- Daniel Wolfe, New York Times Book Review

A remarkable writer offers a remarkable look at the violent history of Pakistan's independence with the author's most intimate memories--of her Welsh mother, an English teacher of spare, abstracted eloquence; of her Pakistani father, a prominent and frequently jailed political journalist; of her tenacious grandmother; and of the friends who accompany her own passage to the West. A profoundly moving literary work.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Suleri's memoir of postcolonial Pakistan focuses on language as a means to personal and cultural self-definition. ``In interpreting an intricate past so resourcefully, Suleri . . . expands the usual boundaries of autobiography to include philosophical, literary, historical and linguistic issues in an elegantly unified document,'' said PW. (June)
Library Journal
This is an intriguing, yet unsatisfying book. Intriguing because the author weaves the private history of her family into the public and political history of her homeland, Pakistan. Unsatisfying, in that neither tale seems complete. The author's personal joys and losses play against the violence of a country as it fights for and wins its independence. That independence was central to the family seems both obvious and abstract. Though the family's existence was in many ways defined by events, it seems oddly disassociated from these events. Still, the book is engaging. It is mainly through family relationships, especially those of the women, that the two stories are joined. This is a very personal autobiography. -- Frada L. Mozenter, Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte Lib.
Booknews
Integrates available knowledge about the essential large data bases in criminological research. Contributors discuss theoretical issues of crime measurement, analyze the National Crime Survey, examine surveys and censuses for prisons and jails, explore the use of archival data, and discuss implications for policy in the criminal justice arena. Paper edition (unseen), $16.95. An autobiographical sequence of meditations on one family's experience with the turmoil of Pakistan and events leading to the author's move to the US. Suleri (English, Yale) recounts memories of her Pakistani father, a prominent political journalist. No bibliography. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Independent
"[Meatless Days] is, ultimately, a book of loss. The deaths of Suleri's mother and sister form the heart of this memoir; every moment is refracted through a lens of pain. . . . For all the verbal panache and structural ingenuity of Meatless Days, the final words I say about it must be this: I have never read a finer depiction of the fierceness of sibling love."

— Kamila Shamsie

Voice Literary Supplement

“Dazzling. . . . For with her own recognition that history is not the exclusive property of her father’s copperplates, Suleri has set herself loose, a Proust in Pakistan, to wander among her own several lives.”

— Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Washington Post Book World

“Suleri has chosen to take the fragments of a life, and related lives, into her palm, shake them, spread them out, then gather them up and give them another shake, as if she were playing with a kaleidoscope. . . . They are like the patterns carved out of lapis lazuli and agate, onyx and opal, set in the marble of Moghul tombs.”
— Anita Desai,

Chicago Tribune

Meatless Days takes the reader through a Third World that will surprise and confound him even as it records the author’s similar perplexities while coming to terms with the West. Those voyages Suleri narrates in great strings of words and images so rich that they left this reader, at least, alternately sated and hungering for more.”

— Ron Grossman

Los Angeles Times Book Review

“A jewel of insight and beauty.”

— Rone Tempest

Independent - Kamila Shamsie

"[Meatless Days] is, ultimately, a book of loss. The deaths of Suleri's mother and sister form the heart of this memoir; every moment is refracted through a lens of pain. . . . For all the verbal panache and structural ingenuity of Meatless Days, the final words I say about it must be this: I have never read a finer depiction of the fierceness of sibling love."
Voice Literary Supplement - Henry Louis Gates Jr.

“Dazzling. . . . For with her own recognition that history is not the exclusive property of her father’s copperplates, Suleri has set herself loose, a Proust in Pakistan, to wander among her own several lives.”
Washington Post Book World - Anita Desai

“Suleri has chosen to take the fragments of a life, and related lives, into her palm, shake them, spread them out, then gather them up and give them another shake, as if she were playing with a kaleidoscope. . . . They are like the patterns carved out of lapis lazuli and agate, onyx and opal, set in the marble of Moghul tombs.”
Chicago Tribune - Ron Grossman

Meatless Days takes the reader through a Third World that will surprise and confound him even as it records the author’s similar perplexities while coming to terms with the West. Those voyages Suleri narrates in great strings of words and images so rich that they left this reader, at least, alternately sated and hungering for more.”
Los Angeles Times Book Review - Rone Tempest

“A jewel of insight and beauty.”

 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226779812
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/1991
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 186
  • Sales rank: 1,149,410
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Sara Suleri Goodyear is a professor of English at Yale University. She is the author of Meatless Days and Boys Will Be Boys.

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Table of Contents


Excellent Things in Women
Meatless Days
Mustakori, My Friend: A Study of Perfect Ignorance
Goodbye to the Greatness of Tom
The Right Path; or, They Took the Wrong Road
Papa and Pakistan
The Immoderation of Ifat
What Mamma Knew
Saving Daylight
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2005

    Rich, vibrant read

    I read Meatless Days while traveling in India and found it a powerful, beautiful portrayal, something I could sink my teeth into as I tried to make sense of an unfamiliar place and culture. It has been several years but I still recall many of her vivid descriptions, sights, smells and sounds and can picture her family members as if I'd run into them recently.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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