Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings / Edition 11

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Overview

For more than half a century, this book has been a fixture in architecture and construction firms the world over. Twice awarded the AIA's Citation for Excellence in International Architecture Book Publishing, Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings is recognized for its comprehensiveness, clarity of presentation, and timely coverage of new design trends and technologies. Addressing mechanical and electrical systems for buildings of all sizes, it provides design guidelines and detailed design procedures for each topic covered. Thoroughly updated to cover the latest technologies, new and emerging design trends, and relevant codes, this latest edition features more than 2,200 illustrations - 200 new to this edition - and a companion Website with additional resources.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470195659
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/24/2009
  • Series: CourseSmart Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 11
  • Pages: 1792
  • Sales rank: 167,876
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 2.50 (d)

Meet the Author

WALTER T. GRONDZIK, PE, LEED AP BD+C, is an architectural engineer and Professor of Architecture at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. Grondzik is a Fellow of ASHRAE, a Fellow of the American Solar Energy Society, and a past president of the Society of Building Science Educators and of the Architectural Research Centers Consortium. His research includes building commissioning, sustainability and high-performance building initiatives, and all areas of environmental control systems and their effects on buildings and occupants.

ALISON G. KWOK, PHD, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is an architect and Professor of Architecture at the University of Oregon, Eugene, teaching design studios, seminars in building performance, and environmental technology. Kwok is a Fellow of the American Solar Energy Society and a Certified Passive House Consultant. Her research includes identifying adaptive and mitigation strategies for climate change, thermal comfort, and building performance case studies.

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Table of Contents

Preface xvii

Acknowledgments xix

PART I THE BUILDING DESIGN CONTEXT

Chapter 1 DESIGN PROCESS

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Design Intent

1.3 Design Criteria

1.4 Methods and Tools

1.5 Validation and Evaluation

1.6 Influences on the Design Process

1.7 A Philosophy of Design

1.8 Lessons from the Field

1.9 Case Study—Design Process

Chapter 2 ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Energy

2.3 Water

2.4 Materials

2.5 Design Challenges

2.6 How Are We Doing?

2.7 Case Study—Design Process and Environmental Resources

Chapter 3 SITES AND RESOURCES

3.1 Climates

3.2 Climates within Climates

3.3 Buildings and Sites

3.4 Analyzing the Site

3.5 Site Design Strategies

3.6 Direct Sun and Daylight

3.7 Sound and Airflow

3.8 Rain and Groundwater

3.9 Plants

3.10 Case Study—Site and Resource Design

PART II DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS

Chapter 4 THERMAL COMFORT

4.1 The Body and Heat

4.2 Psychrometry

4.3 Thermal Comfort

Chapter 5 INDOOR AIR QUALITY

5.1 Indoor Air Quality and Building Design

5.2 Pollutant Sources and Impacts

5.3 Predicting Indoor Air Quality

5.4 Zoning for IAQ

5.5 Passive and Low-Energy Approaches for Control of IAQ

5.6 Active Approaches for Control of IAQ

5.7 IAQ, Materials, and Health

Chapter 6 SOLAR GEOMETRY AND SHADING DEVICES

6.1 The Sun and Its Position

6.2 Solar versus Clock Time

6.3 True South and Magnetic Deviation

6.4 Sunpath Projections

6.5 Shading

6.6 Shadow Angles and Shading Masks

Chapter 7 HEAT FLOW

7.1 The Building Envelope

7.2 Building Envelope Design Intentions

7.3 Sensible Heat Flow through Opaque Walls and Roofs

7.4 Latent Heat Flow through the Opaque Envelope

7.5 Heat Flow through Transparent/Translucent Elements

7.6 Trends in Envelope Thermal Performance

7.7 Heat Flow via Air Movement

7.8 Calculating Envelope Heat Flows

7.9 Envelope Thermal Design Standards

7.10 Case Study—Heat Flow and Envelope Design

PART III PASSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

Chapter 8 DAYLIGHTING

8.1 The Daylighting Opportunity

8.2 Human Factors in Daylighting Design

8.3 Site Strategies for Daylighting Buildings

8.4 Aperture Strategies: Sidelighting

8.5 Aperture Strategies: Toplighting

8.6 Specialized Daylighting Strategies

8.7 Basic Characteristics of Light Sources

8.8 Selecting an Appropriate Light Source

8.9 Characteristics of Daylight

8.10 Standard Overcast Sky

8.11 Clear Sky

8.12 Partly Cloudy Sky

8.13 Daylight Factor

8.14 Components of Daylight

8.15 Guidelines for Preliminary Daylighting Design

8.16 Design Analysis Methods

8.17 Daylighting Simulation Programs

8.18 Physical Modeling

8.19 Recapping Daylighting

8.20 Case Study—Daylighting Design

Chapter 9 PASSIVE HEATING

9.1 Brief History

9.2 Design Strategies for Heating

9.3 Guidelines: Passive Solar Heating

9.4 Calculating Worst-Hourly Heat Loss

9.5 Calculations for Heating-Season Fuel Consumption (Conventional Buildings)

9.6 Detailed Calculations: Passive Heating Performance

9.7 Case Study—Designing for Passive Heating

Chapter 10 PASSIVE COOLING

10.1 Brief History

10.2 Design Strategies for Cooling

10.3 Summer Heat Gain Guidelines

10.4 Passive Cooling Guidelines

10.5 Reintegrating Daylighting, Passive Solar Heating, and Cooling

10.6 Approximate Method for Calculating Heat Gain (Cooling Load)

10.7 Detailed Hourly Heat Gain (Cooling Load) Calculations

10.8 Detailed Calculations: Passive Cooling Performance

Chapter 11 INTEGRATING PASSIVE SYSTEMS

11.1 Organizing the Design Problem

11.2 Combining Strategies

11.3 Project Performance

11.4 Project Summary

11.5 Case Study—Designing for Passive Heating and Cooling

PART IV ACTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

Chapter 12 ACTIVE CLIMATE CONTROL

12.1 Introduction

12.2 History and Context

12.3 Relevant Codes and Standards

12.4 Fundamentals

HVAC Components

12.5 Source Components: Heat

12.6 Heating Equipment

12.7 Source Components: Coolth

12.8 Cooling Equipment

12.9 Distribution Components: Air

12.10 Distribution Components: Water

12.11 Air Delivery

12.12 Water Delivery

12.13 Air Filters

12.14 Controls

HVAC Systems

12.15 HVAC Systems Taxonomy

12.16 HVAC Systems Anatomy

12.17 HVAC Systems for Small Buildings

12.18 HVAC Systems for Large Buildings

12.19 Trends in HVAC Systems Design

12.20 Energy Efficiency Equipment and Systems

12.21 Case Study—Active Climate Control Systems

Chapter 13 LIGHTING FUNDAMENTALS

13.1 Introductory Remarks

Physics of Light

13.2 Light as Radiant Energy

13.3 Transmittance and Reflectance

13.4 Terminology and Definitions

13.5 Luminous Intensity

13.6 Luminous Flux

13.7 Illuminance

13.8 Luminance, Exitance, and Brightness

13.9 Illuminance Measurement

13.10 Luminance Measurement

13.11 Reflectance Measurements

13.12 Inverse Square Law

13.13 Luminous Intensity: Candela Measurements

13.14 Intensity Distribution Curves

Light and Sight

13.15 The Eye

13.16 Factors in Visual Acuity

13.17 Size of the Visual Object

13.18 Subjective Brightness

13.19 Contrast and Adaptation

13.20 Exposure Time

13.21 Secondary Task-Related Factors

13.22 Observer-Related Visibility Factors

13.23 The Aging Eye

Quantity of Light

13.24 Illuminance Levels

13.25 Illuminance Category

13.26 Illuminance Recommendations

Quality of Lighting

13.27 Considerations of Lighting Quality

13.28 Direct (Discomfort) Glare

13.29 Veiling Reflections and Reflected Glare

13.30 Equivalent Spherical Illumination and Relative Visual Performance

13.31 Control of Reflected Glare

13.32 Luminance Ratios

13.33 Patterns of Luminance: Subjective Reactions to Lighting

Fundamentals of Color

13.34 Color Temperature

13.35 Object Color

13.36 Reactions to Color

13.37 Chromaticity

13.38 Spectral Distribution of Light Sources

13.39 Color Rendering Index

Chapter 14 ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES

14.1 The Incandescent Filament Lamp

14.2 Special Incandescent Lamps

14.3 Tungsten–Halogen (Quartz–Iodine) Lamps

14.4 Tungsten–Halogen Lamp Types

Gaseous Discharge Lamps

14.5 Ballasts

Fluorescent Lamps

14.6 Fluorescent Lamp Construction

14.7 Fluorescent Lamp Labels

14.8 Fluorescent Lamp Types

14.9 Characteristics of Fluorescent Lamp Operation

14.10 Federal Standards for Fluorescent Lamps

14.11 Special Fluorescent Lamps

14.12 Compact Fluorescent Lamps

High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

14.13 Mercury Vapor Lamps

14.14 Metal–Halide Lamps

14.15 Sodium Vapor Lamps

14.16 Low-Pressure Sodium Lamps

Solid State Lighting

14.17 Light-Emitting Diodes

14.18 Induction Lamps

14.19 Sulfur Lamps

14.20 Fiber Optics

Chapter 15 LIGHTING DESIGN PROCESS

15.1 General Information

15.2 Goals of Lighting Design

15.3 Lighting Design Procedure

15.4 Cost Factors

15.5 Power Budgets

15.6 Task Analysis

15.7 Energy Considerations

15.8 Preliminary Design

15.9 Illumination Methods

15.10 Types of Lighting Systems

15.11 Indirect Lighting

15.12 Semi-Indirect Lighting

15.13 Direct–Indirect and General Diffuse Lighting

15.14 Semi-Direct Lighting

15.15 Direct Lighting

15.16 Size and Pattern of Luminaires

15.17 Other Design Considerations

Chapter 16 ELECTRIC LIGHTING DESIGN

Luminaires

16.1 Design Considerations

16.2 Lighting Fixture Distribution Characteristics

16.3 Luminaire Light Control

16.4 Luminaire Diffusers

16.5 Uniformity of Illumination

16.6 Luminaire Mounting Height

16.7 Lighting Fixtures

16.8 Lighting Fixture Construction

16.9 Lighting Fixture Structural Support

16.10 Lighting Fixture Appraisal

16.11 Luminaire–Room System Efficiency: Coefficient of Utilization

16.12 Luminaire Efficacy Rating

Lighting Control

16.13 Requirement for Lighting Control

16.14 Lighting Control: Switching

16.15 Lighting Control: Dimming

16.16 Lighting Control: Control Initiation

16.17 Lighting Control Strategy

Detailed Design Procedures

16.18 Calculation of Average Illuminance

16.19 Calculation of Horizontal Illuminance by the Lumen (Flux) Method

16.20 Calculation of Light Loss Factor

16.21 Determination of the Coefficient of Utilization by the Zonal Cavity Method

16.22 Zonal Cavity Calculations: Illustrative Examples

16.23 Zonal Cavity Calculation by Approximation

16.24 Effect of Cavity Reflectances on Illuminance

16.25 Modular Lighting Design

16.26 Calculating Illuminance at a Point

16.27 Design Aids

16.28 Calculating Illuminance from a Point Source

16.29 Calculating Illuminance from Linear and Area Sources

16.30 Computer-Aided Lighting Design

16.31 Average Luminance Calculations

Evaluation

16.32 Lighting Design Evaluation

Chapter 17 ELECTRIC LIGHTING APPLICATIONS

17.1 Introduction

Residential Occupancies

17.2 Residential Lighting: General Information

17.3 Residential Lighting: Energy Issues

17.4 Residential Lighting Sources

17.5 Residential Lighting: Design Suggestions

17.6 Residential Lighting: Luminaires and Architectural Lighting Elements

17.7 Residential Lighting: Control

Educational Facilities

17.8 Institutional and Educational Buildings

17.9 General Classrooms

17.10 Special-Purpose Classrooms

17.11 Assembly Rooms, Auditoriums, and Multipurpose Spaces

17.12 Gymnasium Lighting

17.13 Lecture Hall Lighting

17.14 Laboratory Lighting

17.15 Library Lighting

17.16 Special Areas

17.17 Other Considerations in School Lighting

Commercial Interiors

17.18 Office Lighting: General Information

17.19 Lighting for Areas with Visual Digital Displays

17.20 Office Lighting Guidelines

17.21 Task-Ambient Office Lighting Design Using Ceiling-Mounted Units

17.22 Task-Ambient Office Lighting Using Furniture-Integrated Luminaires

17.23 Integrated and Modular Ceilings

17.24 Lighting and Air Conditioning

Industrial Lighting

17.25 General Information

17.26 Levels and Sources

17.27 Industrial Luminance Ratios

17.28 Industrial Lighting Glare

17.29 Industrial Lighting Equipment

17.30 Vertical-Surface Illumination

Special Lighting Application Topics

17.31 Emergency Lighting

17.32 Floodlighting

17.33 Street Lighting

17.34 Light Pollution

17.35 Remote-Source Lighting

17.36 Fiber-Optic Lighting

17.37 Fiber-Optic Terminology

17.38 Fiber-Optic Lighting—Arrangements and Applications

17.39 Hollow Light Guides

17.40 Prismatic Light Guides

17.41 Prismatic Film Light Guide

17.42 Remote-Source Standards and Nomenclature

Chapter 18 WATER AND BASIC DESIGN

18.1 Water in Architecture

18.2 The Hydrologic Cycle

18.3 Basic Planning

18.4 Rainwater

18.5 Collection and Storage

18.6 Rainwater and Site Planning

18.7 Components

18.8 Case Study—Water and Basic Design

Chapter 19 WATER SUPPLY

19.1 Water Quality

19.2 Filtration

19.3 Disinfection

19.4 Other Water Treatments

19.5 Water Sources

19.6 Hot Water Systems and Equipment

19.7 Fixtures and Water Conservation

19.8 Fixture Accessibility and Privacy

19.9 Water Distribution

19.10 Piping, Tubing, Fittings, and Controls

19.11 Sizing of Water Pipes

19.12 Irrigation

Chapter 20 LIQUID WASTE

20.1 Waterless Toilets and Urinals

20.2 Principles of Drainage

20.3 Piping, Fittings, and Accessories

20.4 Design of Residential Waste Piping

20.5 Design of Larger-Building Waste Piping

20.6 On-Site Individual Building Sewage Treatment

20.7 On-Site Multiple-Building Sewage Treatment

20.8 Larger-Scale Sewage Treatment Systems

20.9 Recycling and Graywater

20.10 Storm Water Treatment

20.11 Case Study—Water Conservation and Resource Design

Chapter 21 SOLID WASTE

21.1 Waste and Resources

21.2 Resource Recovery: Central or Local?

21.3 Solid Waste in Small Buildings

21.4 Solid Waste in Large Buildings

21.5 Equipment for the Handling of Solid Waste

21.6 The Service Core

PART V ACOUSTICS

Chapter 22 FUNDAMENTALS OF ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS

22.1 Architectural Acoustics

22.2 Sound

22.3 Hearing

22.4 Sound Sources

22.5 Expressing Sound Magnitude

22.6 Noise

22.7 Vibration

Chapter 23 SOUND IN ENCLOSED SPACES

23.1 Sound in Enclosures

Absorption

23.2 Sound Absorption

23.3 Mechanics of Absorption

23.4 Absorptive Materials

23.5 Installation of Absorptive Materials

Room Acoustics

23.6 Reverberation

23.7 Sound Fields in an Enclosed Space

23.8 Sound Power Level and Sound Pressure Level

23.9 Noise Reduction by Absorption

23.10 Noise Reduction Coefficient

Room Design

23.11 Reverberation Criteria for Speech Rooms

23.12 Criteria for Music Performance

23.13 Sound Paths

23.14 Ray Diagrams

23.15 Auditorium Design

Sound Reinforcement Systems

23.16 Objectives and Criteria

23.17 Components and Specifications

23.18 Loudspeaker Considerations

Chapter 24 BUILDING NOISE CONTROL

Noise Reduction

Absorption

24.1 The Role of Absorption

24.2 Panel and Cavity Resonators

24.3 Acoustically Transparent Surfaces

24.4 Absorption Recommendations

24.5 Characteristics of Absorptive Materials

Sound Isolation

24.6 Airborne and Structure-Borne Sound

Airborne Sound

24.7 Transmission Loss and Noise Reduction

24.8 Barrier Mass

24.9 Stiffness and Resonance

24.10 Compound Barriers (Cavity Walls)

24.11 Sound Transmission Class

24.12 Composite Walls and Leaks

24.13 Doors and Windows

24.14 Diffraction: Barriers

24.15 Flanking

Speech Privacy

24.16 Principles of Speech Privacy between Enclosed Spaces

24.17 Sound Isolation Descriptors

24.18 Speech Privacy Design for Enclosed Spaces

24.19 Principles of Speech Privacy in Open-Area Offices

24.20 Open-Office Speech Privacy Levels and Descriptors

24.21 Design Recommendations for Speech Privacy in Open Offices

Structure-Borne Noise

24.22 Structure-Borne Impact Noise

24.23 Control of Impact Noise

24.24 Impact Insulation Class

Mechanical System Noise Control

24.25 Mechanical Noise Sources

24.26 Quieting of Machines

24.27 Duct System Noise Reduction

24.28 Active Noise Cancellation

24.29 Piping System Noise Reduction

24.30 Electrical Equipment Noise

24.31 Noise Problems Due to Equipment Location

24.32 Sound Isolation Enclosures, Barriers, and Damping

STC and IIC Recommendations and Criteria

24.33 Multiple-Occupancy Residential STC/IIC Criteria

24.34 Specific Occupancies

Outdoor Acoustic Considerations

24.35 Sound Power and Pressure Levels in Free Space (Outdoors)

24.36 Building Siting

Reference Material

24.37 Glossary

24.38 Reference Standards

24.39 Units and Conversions

24.40 Symbols

PART VI FIRE PROTECTION

Chapter 25 FIRE PROTECTION

Fire Resistance, Egress, and Extinguishment

25.1 Design for Fire Resistance

25.2 Smoke Control

25.3 Water for Fire Suppression

25.4 Other Fire-Mitigating Methods

25.5 Lightning Protection

Fire Alarm Systems

25.6 General Considerations

25.7 Fire Codes, Authorities, and Standards

25.8 Fire Alarm Definitions and Terms

25.9 Types of Fire Alarm Systems

25.10 Circuit Supervision

25.11 Conventional Systems

25.12 System Coding

25.13 Signal Processing

25.14 Addressable Fire Alarm Systems

25.15 Addressable Analog (Intelligent) Systems

25.16 Automatic Fire Detection: Incipient Stage

25.17 Automatic Fire Detection: Smoldering Stage

25.18 Automatic Fire Detection: Flame Stage

25.19 Automatic Fire Detection: Heat Stage

25.20 Special Types of Fire Detectors

25.21 False Alarm Mitigation

25.22 Manual Stations

25.23 Sprinkler Alarms

25.24 Audible and Visual Alarm Devices

25.25 General Recommendations

25.26 Residential Fire Alarm Basics

25.27 Multiple-Dwelling Alarm Systems

25.28 Commercial and Institutional Building Alarm Systems

25.29 High-Rise Office Building Fire Alarm Systems

25.30 Industrial Facilities

PART VII ELECTRICITY

Chapter 26 PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICITY

26.1 Electric Energy

26.2 Unit of Electric Current—the Ampere

26.3 Unit of Electric Potential—the Volt

26.4 Unit of Electric Resistance—the Ohm

26.5 Ohm’s Law

26.6 Circuit Arrangements

26.7 Direct Current and Alternating Current

26.8 Electric Power Generation—DC

26.9 Electric Power Generation—AC

26.10 Power and Energy

26.11 Power in Electric Circuits

26.12 Energy in Electric Circuits

26.13 Electric Demand Charges

26.14 Electric Demand Control

26.15 Electrical Measurements

Chapter 27 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS: SERVICE AND UTILIZATION

27.1 Electric Service

27.2 Overhead Service

27.3 Underground Service

27.4 Underground Wiring

27.5 Service Equipment

27.6 Transformers

27.7 Transformers Outdoors

27.8 Transformers Indoors: Heat Loss

27.9 Transformers Indoors: Selection

27.10 Transformer Vaults

27.11 Service Equipment Arrangements and Metering

27.12 Service Switch(es)

27.13 Switches

27.14 Contactors

27.15 Special Switches

27.16 Solid-State Switches, Programmable Switches, Microprocessors, and Programmable Controllers

27.17 Equipment Enclosures

27.18 Circuit-Protective Devices

27.19 Switchboards and Switchgear

27.20 Unit Substations (Transformer Load Centers)

27.21 Panelboards

27.22 Principles of Electric Load Control

27.23 Intelligent Panelboards

27.24 Electric Motors

27.25 Motor Control Standards

27.26 Motor Control

27.27 Motor Control Equipment

27.28 Wiring Devices: General Description

27.29 Wiring Devices: Receptacles

27.30 Wiring Devices: Switches

27.31 Wiring Devices: Specialties

27.32 Low-Voltage Switching

27.33 Wireless Switching and Control

27.34 Power Line Carrier Systems

27.35 Power Conditioning

27.36 Power Conditioning Equipment

27.37 Surge Suppression

27.38 Uninterruptible Power Supply

27.39 Emergency/Standby Power Equipment

27.40 System Inspection

Chapter 28 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS: WIRING AND RACEWAYS

28.1 System Components

28.2 National Electrical Code

28.3 Economic and Environmental Considerations

28.4 Electrical Equipment Ratings

28.5 Interior Wiring Systems

28.6 Conductors

28.7 Conductor Ampacity

28.8 Conductor Insulation and Jackets

28.9 Copper and Aluminum Conductors

28.10 Flexible Armored Cable

28.11 Nonmetallic Sheathed Cable (Romex)

28.12 Conductors for General Wiring

28.13 Special Cable Types

28.14 Busway/Busduct/Cablebus

28.15 Light-Duty Busway, Flat-Cable Assemblies, and Lighting Track

28.16 Cable Tray

28.17 Design Considerations for Raceway Systems

28.18 Steel Conduit

28.19 Aluminum Conduit

28.20 Flexible Metal Conduit

28.21 Nonmetallic Conduit

28.22 Surface Metal Raceways (Metallic and Nonmetallic)

28.23 Outlet and Device Boxes

28.24 Floor Raceways

28.25 Underfloor Duct

28.26 Cellular Metal Floor Raceway

28.27 Precast Cellular Concrete Floor Raceways

28.28 Full-Access Floor

28.29 Under-Carpet Wiring System

28.30 Ceiling Raceways and Manufactured Wiring Systems

Chapter 29 ELECTRIC WIRING DESIGN

29.1 General Considerations

29.2 Load Estimating

29.3 System Voltage

29.4 Grounding and Ground-Fault Protection

29.5 Energy Conservation Considerations

29.6 Electrical Wiring Design Procedure

29.7 Electrical Equipment Spaces

29.8 Electrical Closets

29.9 Equipment Layout

29.10 Application of Overcurrent Equipment

29.11 Branch Circuit Design

29.12 Branch Circuit Design Guidelines: Residential

29.13 Branch Circuit Design Guidelines: Nonresidential

29.14 Load Tabulation

29.15 Spare Capacity

29.16 Feeder Capacity

29.17 Panel Feeder Load Calculation

29.18 Harmonic Currents

29.19 Riser Diagrams

29.20 Service Equipment and Switchboard Design

29.21 Emergency Systems

Chapter 30 PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

30.1 A Context for Photovoltaics

30.2 Terminology and Definitions

30.3 PV Cells

30.4 PV Arrays

30.5 PV System Types and Applications

30.6 PV System Batteries

30.7 Balance of System

30.8 Design of a Stand-Alone PV System

30.9 Design of a Grid-Connected PV System

30.10 Codes and Standards

30.11 PV Installations

30.12 Case Study—PV

PART VIII SIGNAL SYSTEMS

Chapter 31 SIGNAL SYSTEMS

31.1 Introduction

31.2 Principles of Intrusion Detection

Private Residential Systems

31.3 General Information

31.4 Residential Intrusion Alarm Systems

31.5 Residential Intercom Systems

31.6 Residential Telecommunication and Data Systems

31.7 Premise Wiring

Multiple-Dwelling Systems

31.8 Multiple-Dwelling Entry and Security Systems

31.9 Multiple-Dwelling Television Systems

31.10 Multiple-Dwelling Telephone Systems

31.11 Hotels and Motels

School Systems

31.12 General Information

31.13 School Security Systems

31.14 School Clock and Program Systems

31.15 School Intercom Systems

31.16 School Sound Systems

31.17 School Electronic Teaching Equipment

Office Building Systems

31.18 General Information

31.19 Office Building Security Systems

31.20 Office Building Communications Systems

31.21 Office Building Communications Planning

31.22 Office Building Control and Automation Systems

Industrial Building Systems

31.23 General Information

31.24 Industrial Building Personnel Access Control

31.25 Industrial Building Sound and Paging Systems

Automation

31.26 General Information

31.27 Stand-Alone Lighting Control Systems

31.28 Building Automation Systems

31.29 Glossary of Computer and Control Terminology

31.30 BAS Arrangement

31.31 Intelligent Buildings

31.32 Intelligent Residences

Building Physical Security

PART IX TRANSPORTATION

Chapter 32 VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION: PASSENGER ELEVATORS

General Information

32.1 Introduction

32.2 Passenger Elevators

32.3 Codes and Standards

Traction Elevator Equipment

32.4 Principal Components

32.5 Gearless Traction Machines

32.6 Geared Traction Machines

32.7 Arrangement of Elevator Machines, Sheaves, and Ropes

32.8 Safety Devices

Hydraulic Elevators

32.9 Conventional Plunger-Type Hydraulic Elevators

32.10 Hole-less Hydraulic Elevators

32.11 Roped Hydraulic Elevators

Passenger Interaction Issues

32.12 Elevator Doors

32.13 Cars and Signals

32.14 Requirements for the Disabled

Elevator Car Control

32.15 Drive Control

32.16 Thyristor Control, AC and DC

32.17 Variable-Voltage DC Motor Control

32.18 Variable-Voltage, Variable-Frequency AC Motor Control

32.19 Elevator Operating Control

32.20 System Control Requirements

32.21 Single Automatic Pushbutton Control

32.22 Collective Control

32.23 Selective Collective Operation

32.24 Computerized System Control

32.25 Rehabilitation Work: Performance Prediction

32.26 Lobby Elevator Panel

32.27 Car Operating Panel

Elevator Selection

32.28 General Considerations

32.29 Definitions

32.30 Interval or Lobby Dispatch Time and Average Lobby Waiting Time

32.31 Handling Capacity

32.32 Travel Time or Average Trip Time

32.33 Round-Trip Time

32.34 System Relationships

32.35 Car Speed

32.36 Single-Zone Systems

32.37 Multizone Systems

32.38 Elevator Selection for Specific Occupancies

Physical Properties and Spatial Requirements of Elevators

32.39 Shafts and Lobbies

32.40 Dimensions and Weights

32.41 Structural Stresses

Power and Energy

32.42 Power Requirements

32.43 Energy Requirements

32.44 Energy Conservation

32.45 Emergency Power

Special Considerations

32.46 Fire Safety

32.47 Elevator Security

32.48 Elevator Noise

32.49 Elevator Specifications

32.50 Innovative Equipment

32.51 Case Study—Vertical Transportation

Chapter 33 VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION: SPECIAL TOPICS

Special Shaft Arrangements

33.1 Sky Lobby Elevator System

33.2 Double-Deck Elevators

Freight Elevators

33.3 General Information

33.4 Freight Car Capacity

33.5 Freight Elevator Description

33.6 Freight Elevator Cars, Gates, and Doors

33.7 Freight Elevator Cost Data

Special Elevator Designs

33.8 Observation Cars

33.9 Inclined Elevators

33.10 Aerial Trams

33.11 Rack and Pinion Elevators

33.12 Residential Elevators and Chair Lifts

33.13 Innovative Motor Drives

Materials Handling

33.14 General Information

33.15 Manual Load/Unload Dumbwaiters

33.16 Automated Dumbwaiters

33.17 Horizontal Conveyors

33.18 Selective Vertical Conveyors

33.19 Pneumatic Tubes

33.20 Pneumatic Trash and Linen Systems

33.21 Automated Container Delivery Systems

33.22 Automated Self-Propelled Vehicles

33.23 Materials Handling Summary

Chapter 34 MOVING STAIRWAYS AND WALKS

Moving Electric Stairways

34.1 General Information

34.2 Parallel and Crisscross Arrangements

34.3 Location

34.4 Size, Speed, Capacity, and Rise

34.5 Components

34.6 Safety Features

34.7 Fire Protection

34.8 Lighting

34.9 Escalator Applications

34.10 Elevators and Escalators

34.11 Electric Power Requirements

34.12 Special-Design Escalators

34.13 Preliminary Design Data and Installation Drawings

34.14 Budget Estimating for Escalators

Moving Walks and Ramps

34.15 General Information

34.16 Application of Moving Walks

34.17 Application of Moving Ramps

34.18 Size, Capacity, and Speed

34.19 Components

PART X APPENDICES

Appendix A Metrication, SI Units, and Conversions

Appendix B Climatic Conditions for the United States, Canada, and Mexico

Appendix C Solar and Daylighting Design Data

Appendix D Solar Geometry

Appendix E Thermal Properties of Materials and Assemblies

Appendix F Ventilation and Infiltration

Appendix G Heating and Cooling Design Guidelines and Information

Appendix H Standards/Guidelines for Energy- and Resource-Efficient Building Design

Appendix I Annual Solar Performance

Appendix J Economic Analysis

Appendix K Sound Transmission Data

Appendix L Design Analysis Software

Index

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2013

    Must Have

    If you are planning to take the Building Systems ARE Exam, you MUST have this reference book and be familiar with the basic content.

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