Mechanics of Materials / Edition 3

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Overview

By emphasizing the three key concepts of mechanics of solids, this new edition helps engineers improve their problem-solving skills. They'll discover how these fundamental concepts underlie all of the applications presented, and they'll learn how to identify the equations needed to solve various problems. New discussions are included on literature reviews, focusing on the literature review found in proposals and research articles. Groupware communication tools including blogs, wikis and meeting applications are covered. More information is also presented on transmittal letters and PowerPoint style presentations.  And with the addition of detailed example problems, engineers will learn how to organize their solutions.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
New edition of a text that introduces the mechanics of materials, an engineering subject that also is described as the mechanics of solids, of deformable bodies, and strength of materials. Craig (ASE-EM Department, U. of Texas) presents a systematic four-step problem-solving method that helps the student to discover how fundamental concepts underlie all the applications presented, and how to identify the equations needed to solve various problems. Detailed example problems show how to organize solutions and think like practicing engineers. The included CD-ROM covers a broad range of topics and contains 90 special MDSolids example problems. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470481813
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 2/2/2011
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 856
  • Sales rank: 660,730
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Roy R. Craig, Jr. is the John J. McKetta Energy Professor in Engineering in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at The University of Texas at Austin. He received his B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Oklahoma, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1961 he has been on the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin. His industrial experience has been with the U.S. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, the Boeing Company. Lockhead Palo Alto Research Laboratory, Exxon Production Research Corporation, NASA, and IBM.
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Table of Contents

1 INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS OF MATERIALS 1

1.1 What Is Mechanics of Materials? 1

(Includes Color-Photo Insert)

1.2 The Fundamental Equations of Deformable-Body Mechanics, 4

1.3 Problem-Solving Procedures, 6

1.4 Review of Static Equilibrium; Equilibrium of Deformable Bodies, 8

1.5 Problems, 17

Chapter 1 Review, 21

2 STRESS AND STRAIN; INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN 22

2.1 Introduction, 22

2.2 Normal Stress, 23

2.3 Extensional Strain; Thermal Strain, 31

2.4 Stress-Strain Diagrams; Mechanical Properties of Materials, 37

2.5 Elasticity and Plasticity; Temperature Effects, 45

2.6 Linear Elasticity; Hooke’s Law and Poisson’s Ratio, 48

2.7 Shear Stress and Shear Strain; Shear Modulus, 51

2.8 Introduction to Design—Axial Loads and Direct Shear, 57

2.9 Stresses on an Inclined Plane in an Axially Loaded Member, 65

2.10 Saint-Venant’s Principle, 67

2.11 Hooke’s Law for Plane Stress; The Relationship Between E and G, 69

2.12 General Definitions of Stress and Strain, 72

*2.13 Cartesian Components of Stress; Generalized Hooke’s Law for Isotropic Materials, 82

*2.14 Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials, 87

2.15 Problems, 89

Chapter 2 Review, 113

3 AXIAL DEFORMATION 118

3.1 Introduction, 118

3.2 Basic Theory of Axial Deformation, 118

3.3 Examples of Nonuniform Axial Deformation, 126

3.4 Statically Determinate Structures, 136

3.5 Statically Indeterminate Structures, 143

3.6 Thermal Effects on Axial Deformation, 152

3.7 Geometric ‘‘Misfits,’’ 163

3.8 Displacement-Method Solution of Axial-Deformation Problems, 168

*3.9 Force-Method Solution of Axial- Deformation Problems, 180

*3.10 Introduction to the Analysis of Planar Trusses, 189

*3.11 Inelastic Axial Deformation, 197

3.12 Problems, 209

Chapter 3 Review, 234

4 TORSION 237

4.1 Introduction, 237

4.2 Torsional Deformation of Circular Bars, 238

4.3 Torsion of Linearly Elastic Circular Bars, 241

4.4 Stress Distribution in Circular Torsion Bars; Torsion Testing, 249

4.5 Statically Determinate Assemblages of Uniform Torsion Members, 253

4.6 Statically Indeterminate Assemblages of Uniform Torsion Members, 258

*4.7 Displacement-Method Solution of Torsion Problems, 266

4.8 Power-Transmission Shafts, 272

*4.9 Thin-Wall Torsion Members, 275

*4.10 Torsion of Noncircular Prismatic Bars, 280

*4.11 Inelastic Torsion of Circular Rods, 284

4.12 Problems, 290

Chapter 4 Review, 307

5 EQUILIBRIUM OF BEAMS 309

5.1 Introduction, 309

5.2 Equilibrium of Beams Using Finite Free-Body Diagrams, 314

5.3 Equilibrium Relationships Among Loads, Shear Force, and Bending Moment, 318

5.4 Shear-Force and Bending-Moment Diagrams: Equilibrium Method 321

5.5 Shear-Force and Bending-Moment Diagrams: Graphical Method 326

*5.6 Discontinuity Functions to Represent Loads, Shear, and Moment, 333

5.7 Problems, 340

Chapter 5 Review, 348

6 STRESSES IN BEAMS 351

6.1 Introduction, 351

6.2 Strain-Displacement Analysis, 354

6.3 Flexural Stress in Linearly Elastic Beams, 360

6.4 Design of Beams for Strength, 369

6.5 Flexural Stress in Nonhomogeneous Beams, 375

*6.6 Unsymmetric Bending, 383

*6.7 Inelastic Bending of Beams, 392

6.8 Shear Stress and Shear Flow in Beams, 402

6.9 Limitations on the Shear-Stress Formula, 408

6.10 Shear Stress in Thin-Wall Beams, 411

6.11 Shear in Built-Up Beams, 421

*6.12 Shear Center, 425

6.13 Problems, 432

Chapter 6 Review, 460

7 DEFLECTION OF BEAMS 463

7.1 Introduction, 463

7.2 Differential Equations of the Deflection Curve, 464

7.3 Slope and Deflection by Integration—Statically Determinate Beams, 470

7.4 Slope and Deflection by Integration—Statically Indeterminate Beams, 483

*7.5 Use of Discontinuity Functions to Determine Beam Deflections, 488

7.6 Slope and Deflection of Beams: Superposition Method, 495

*7.7 Slope and Deflection of Beams: Displacement Method, 513

7.8 Problems, 520

Chapter 7 Review, 539

8 TRANSFORMATION OF STRESS AND STRAIN; MOHR’S CIRCLE 541

8.1 Introduction, 541

8.2 Plane Stress, 542

8.3 Stress Transformation for Plane Stress, 544

8.4 Principal Stresses and Maximum Shear Stress, 551

8.5 Mohr’s Circle for Plane Stress, 557

8.6 Triaxial Stress; Absolute Maximum Shear Stress, 564

8.7 Plane Strain, 571

8.8 Transformation of Strains in a Plane, 572

8.9 Mohr’s Circle for Strain, 576

8.10 Measurement of Strain; Strain Rosettes, 582

*8.11 Analysis of Three-Dimensional Strain, 587

8.12 Problems, 588

Chapter 8 Review, 601

9 PRESSURE VESSELS; STRESSES DUE TO COMBINED LOADING 604

9.1 Introduction, 604

9.2 Thin-Wall Pressure Vessels, 605

9.3 Stress Distribution in Beams, 611

9.4 Stresses Due to Combined Loads, 616

9.5 Problems, 625

Chapter 9 Review, 633

10 BUCKLING OF COLUMNS 635

10.1 Introduction, 635

10.2 The Ideal Pin-Ended Column; Euler Buckling Load, 638

10.3 The Effect of End Conditions on Column Buckling, 644

*10.4 Eccentric Loading; The Secant Formula, 651

*10.5 Imperfections in Columns, 657

*10.6 Inelastic Buckling of Ideal Columns, 658

10.7 Design of Centrally Loaded Columns, 662

10.8 Problems, 668

Chapter 10 Review, 681

11 ENERGY METHODS 683

11.1 Introduction, 683

11.2 Work and Strain Energy, 684

11.3 Elastic Strain Energy for Various Types of Loading, 691

11.4 Work-Energy Principle for Calculating Deflections, 697

11.5 Castigliano’s Second Theorem; The Unit-Load Method, 702

*11.6 Virtual Work, 713

*11.7 Strain-Energy Methods, 717

*11.8 Complementary-Energy Methods, 722

*11.9 Dynamic Loading; Impact, 732

11.10 Problems, 737

Chapter 11 Review, 751

12 SPECIAL TOPICS RELATED TO DESIGN 753

12.1 Introduction, 753

12.2 Stress Concentrations, 753

*12.3 Failure Theories, 760

*12.4 Fatigue and Fracture, 768

12.5 Problems, 772

Chapter 12 Review, 777

A NUMERICAL ACCURACY; APPROXIMATIONS A-1

A.1 Numerical Accuracy; Significant Digits, A-1

A.2 Approximations, A-2

B SYSTEMS OF UNITS B-1

B.1 Introduction, B-1

B.2 SI Units, B-1

B.3 U.S. Customary Units; Conversion of Units, B-3

C GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF PLANE AREAS C-1

C.1 First Moments of Area; Centroid, C-1

C.2 Moments of Inertia of an Area, C-4

C.3 Product of Inertia of an Area, C-8

C.4 Area Moments of Inertia About Inclined Axes; Principal Moments of Inertia, C-10

D SECTION PROPERTIES OF SELECTED STRUCTURAL SHAPES D-1

D.1 Properties of Steel Wide-Flange (W) Shapes (U.S. Customary Units), D-2

D.2 Properties of Steel Wide-Flange (W) Shapes (SI Units), D-3

D.3 Properties of American Standard (S) Beams (U.S. Customary Units), D-4

D.4 Properties of American Standard (C) Channels (U.S. Customary Units), D-5

D.5 Properties of Steel Angle Sections—Equal Legs (U.S. Customary Units), D-6

D.6 Properties of Steel Angle Sections—Unequal Legs (U.S. Customary Units), D-7

D.7 Properties of Standard-Weight Steel Pipe (U.S. Customary Units), D-8

D.8 Properties of Structural Lumber (U.S. Customary Units), D-9

D.9 Properties of Aluminum Association Standard I-Beams (U.S. Customary Units), D-10

D.10 Properties of Aluminum Association Standard Channels (U.S. Customary Units), D-11

E DEFLECTIONS AND SLOPES OF BEAMS; FIXED-END ACTIONS E-1

E.1 Deflections and Slopes of Cantilever Uniform Beams, E-1

E.2 Deflections and Slopes of Simply Supported Uniform Beams, E-3

E.3 Fixed-End Actions for Uniform Beams, E-4

F MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SELECTED ENGINEERING MATERIALS F-1

F.1 Specific Weight and Mass Density, F-2

F.2 Modulus of Elasticity, Shear Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson’s Ratio, F-3

F.3 Yield Strength, Ultimate Strength, Percent Elongation in 2 Inches, and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion, F-4

G COMPUTATIONAL MECHANICS G-1

G.1 MDSolids, G-1

ANSWERS TO SELECTED ODDNUMBERED PROBLEMS ANS-1

REFERENCES R-1

INDEX I-1

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