Mechanics of Solid Interfaces

Overview

The growing occurrence of heterogeneous materials such as composites or coated substrates in structural parts makes it necessary for designers and scientists to deal with the specific features of the mechanical behavior of solid interfaces.
This book introduces basic concepts on mechanical problems related to the presence of solid/solid interfaces and their practical applications. The various topics discussed here are the mechanical characterization of interfaces, the initiation...

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Overview

The growing occurrence of heterogeneous materials such as composites or coated substrates in structural parts makes it necessary for designers and scientists to deal with the specific features of the mechanical behavior of solid interfaces.
This book introduces basic concepts on mechanical problems related to the presence of solid/solid interfaces and their practical applications. The various topics discussed here are the mechanical characterization of interfaces, the initiation and growth of cracks along interfaces, the origin and control of interface adhesion, focusing in particular on thin films on substrate systems. It is designed and structured to provide a solid background in the mechanics of heterogeneous materials to help students in materials science, as well as scientists and engineers.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848213739
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/28/2012
  • Series: ISTE Series , #704
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 6.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword Muriel Braccini Michel Dupeux xi

Part 1 Fitndamentals 1

Chapter 1 Interfaces: the Physics, Chemistry and Mechanics of Heterogeneous Continua? Michel Dupeux Muriel Bracclni 3

1.1 Definition and terminology 3

1.2 Energy considerations 5

1.3 Elastic behavior of an interface 8

1.3.1 Flat interface 8

1.3.2 Effects of elastic coupling 13

1.3.3 Ellipsoidal elastic inclusion 15

1.4 Experimental stress analysis techniques 18

1.4.1 Digital image correlation 18

1.4.2 Incremental hole-drilling method 19

1.4.3 X-ray diffraction 21

1.4.4 Numerical modeling 23

1.5 Conclusion 24

1.6 Bibliography 25

Chapter 2 Structure and Defects of Crystalline Interfaces Louisette Priester 27

2.1 What is a crystalline interface? 27

2.2 Definitions and geometric tools to describe interfaces 29

2.2.1 Formation of an interface 29

2.2.2 Coincidence lattice 32

2.2.3 Translation lattice of the bicrystal 34

2.3 Structure of interfaces: intrinsic dislocations and structural units 34

2.3.1 Continuous approach to strain at the interface 35

2.3.2 First discrete approach: Read and Shockley model 36

2.3.3 Extension of the discrete approach to any grain boundary: Bollmann's model 38

2.3.4 Intrinsic dislocations and atomic-level description of interfaces 43

2.4 Linear interface defects: extrinsic dislocations 46

2.5 Interaction between dislocations and interfaces: relaxation of interfacial stresses 47

2.5.1 Slip transmission processes across an interface 47

2.5.2 Relaxation processes in the interface 50

2.5.3 Interfacial dislocation stress fields 53

2.5.4 Evolution of stress fields over time 56

2.6 Conclusion 59

2.7 Bibliography 60

Part 2 Singularities, Notches and Interfacial Cracks 65

Chapter 3 Singularities and Interfacial Cracks Dominique Leguillon 67

3.1 Introduction 67

3.2 Singularities 69

3.2.1 A generic case - the V-notch 70

3.2.2 Calculation of the GSIFs 73

3.2.3 The case of interfaces: complex singularities 75

3.2.4 A particular case 76

3.3 Modal mixity 78

3.4 Brittle fracture mechanics 80

3.4.1 The Griffith criterion 81

3.4.2 Kinking of a crack out of the interface 83

3.5 Nucleation of cracks 85

3.5.1 Energy condition 86

3.5.2 Stress condition 88

3.5.3 The nucleation criterion 89

3.6 Deflection of a crack at an interface 91

3.6.1 Weak singularity 92

3.6.2 Strong singularity 94

3.7 Conclusion 96

3.8 Bibliography 97

Chapter 4 Interface Adherence Muriel Braccini 101

4.1 Adhesion and adherence 101

4.2 Mode mixity 104

4.3 Measurement of adherence 107

4.3.1 Grid method 108

4.3.2 Pull test 108

4.3.3 Tape peel test 109

4.3.4 Peel test 111

4.3.5 Bulge-and-blister test 113

4.3.6 Indentation methods (normal and transverse) 116

4.3.7 Wedge test 121

4.3.8 Four-point bending 124

4.4 Conclusion: choosing a test 126

4.5 Bibliography 127

Part 3 Practical Applications 135

Chapter 5 Controlling Adherence Thomas Pardoen Olivier Dezellus

5.1 Introduction 137

5.2 Multiscale adherence modeling 140

5.3 Nature and control of interface bonds 145

5.3.1 Elimination of barriers to adhesion 150

5.3.2 Modification of interface chemistry 154

5.3.3 Reactivity and joining 160

5.3.4 Conclusion 162

5.4 Dissipative mechanisms 163

5.5 The effect of interface geometry 173

5.5.1 Mechanical anchoring 173

5.5.2 Microtextured interface 175

5.5.3 Biomimetics 177

5.6 Conclusion 178

5.7 Bibliography 180

Chapter 6 Crack-interface Interaction Eric Martin 189

6.1 Propagation of a crack near an interface 191

6.2 Criterion of crack deviation by an interface 194

6.3 Propagation of an interfacial crack 202

6.4 Branching criterion of a crack outside an interface 204

6.5 Conclusion 205

6.6 Bibliography 206

Chapter 7 Shock Mechanics and Interfaces Michel Arrigoni Michel Boustie Cyril Bolis Sophie Barradas Laurent Berthe

7.1 Introduction to shock wave mechanics 211

7.1.1 Preface 211

7.1.2 Generation of shock waves 213

7.1.3 Shock wave mechanics relationships 214

7.1.4 Determination of the Hugoniot in plane P-U (the one-dimensional case) 220

7.1.5 Passage of a shock between two materials 221

7.2 Damage under shock 227

7.2.1 Spallation phenomenon 227

7.2.2 Some damage criteria 228

7.3 Application to the shock adhesion test 230

7.3.1 Principle 230

7.3.2 Evaluation of the test on Al-Cu samples 231

7.3.3 Tests on glued assemblages 236

7.4 Retrospective: recent advances made in shock adherence testing 240

7.4.1 Technological advances 240

7.4.2 Analytical approaches 241

7.4.3 Contributions of numerical simulation 242

7.5 Perspectives 243

7.6 Bibliography 243

Part 4 Thin Films 249

Chapter 8 Coating-Substrate Interfaces Michel Dupeux 251

8.1 Thin films on massive substrates: a typical case 251

8.2 State of stress in a thin film-substrate specimen 252

8.2.1 Boundary conditions 252

8.2.2 Strain and stress tensors in the film 253

8.2.3 Strain and stress in a planar substrate 255

8.2.4 Edge effects 259

8.3 Residual strains in thin films 262

8.3.1 Physical and chemical origin of stresses 262

8.3.2 Thermoelastic stresses 263

8.3.3 Extrinsic stresses 264

8.3.4 Intrinsic stresses 264

8.4 Determination of stresses in thin films 266

8.4.1 Problems 266

8.4.2 Some frequent tests for the characterization of thin films and their residual stresses 267

8.5 Conclusions 269

8.6 Bibliography 270

Chapter 9 Damage in Thin Films on Substrates Michel Dupeux Muriel Braccini Guillaume Parry 273

9.1 Overview 273

9.1.1 Typical damage 274

9.1.2 Elastically stored energy 275

9.2 Layers in tension 277

9.2.1 Typology of damages in layers in tension 277

9.2.2 Energy balance of crack growth at the film-substrate interface 280

9.2.3 Stress corrosion cracking 282

9.3 Films in compression 284

9.3.1 Typology of damage in films under compression 284

9.3.2 Mechanical modeling of ripples and blisters 285

9.4 Conclusion 291

9.5 Bibliography 292

List of Authors 295

Index 297

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