Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Enteric Diseases 2 / Edition 1

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Overview

This volume covers the mechanisms of pathogenesis of enteric diseases. The topics include the epidemiology and pathobiology of enteric diseases, mechanisms of identity and interaction between host and pathogen, effector mechanisms in the pathogenesis and regulation of pathogenic activity in enteric diseases, and novel approaches to the prevention and therapy of enteric diseases. Diarrheal diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa are among the most common diseases of animals and humans. They have also been among the most resistant diseases to prevent. Progress in the management of one disease is frequently overshadowed by the emergence of a new, more challenging enteric disease problem. The zoonotic character of many enteric pathogens links veterinary and medical concerns. At least five enteropathogens, Campylobacter jejuni, non-typhoid Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Clostridium perfringens, and Cryptosporidium parvum, shed in the feces of pigs, cattle, and/or poultry, are important causes of diarrhea in human beings. Substantial progress in the control of enteric pathogens will require greater understanding of the mechanisms by which these organisms cause disease, elucidation of environments that favor their proliferation, and clarification of natural host defenses against them. The advances in knowledge presented here will help lead to the development of novel and innovative approaches to prevention and therapy, as well as to improvements to conventional treatments.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Mark T. DeMeo
This book presents the proceedings of the First International Conference on Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Enteric Diseases and, as such, is a collection of scientific papers and topic reviews dealing with the pathogenesis of enteric diseases. It approaches this topic primarily from aspects that influence a pathogen's ability to cause disease in both humans and animals. However, the text does describe some host defenses used to combat enteric infections. The conference was conceived as a forum for interdisciplinary discussions on mechanisms of enteric disease. It was intended to stimulate ideas and promote collaboration among the participating scientists. The book was an attempt to gather this material and share the findings of this conference with a larger population. Because enteral infections are a common and potentially devastating problem, the text provides information from experts in this field for the interested reader. Although seemingly the intent of the conference, and therefore presumably the text, no attempt was made to include provocative discussions or collaborative ideas that may have occurred at the conference. The book is intended for basic scientists working in the area of enteric infection and targets a reader with more than a core knowledge in this field. Topics cover animal and human enteric disease. Although there are many potentially exciting areas of research, the book as written offers little practical utility for the clinician. The electron micrographs and histology photographs are exceptional and help depict visually the pathogenesis of enteric infections. The remainder of the illustrations, as a whole, are less exciting, and there are severalstretches of text that are not illustrated. The articles are well supported by current and appropriate references. Individually, many of the chapters in this text offer new and exciting insight into the pathogenesis of enteric disease and hint at potential treatment options. Alternatively, other sections deal with issues that are so specialized or technologically sophisticated as to limit the general appeal of the book. Although the papers and reviews in this book share a common theme, they lack a narrative flow, and thus are cumbersome to read. Additionally, individual articles rely on references to provide the background and in-depth discussion for many of the studies. This format relies on previous familiarity with the subject and is not an effective way to transfer information to readers attempting to increase their knowledge base.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Mark T. DeMeo, MD (Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine)
Description:This book presents the proceedings of the First International Conference on Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Enteric Diseases and, as such, is a collection of scientific papers and topic reviews dealing with the pathogenesis of enteric diseases. It approaches this topic primarily from aspects that influence a pathogen's ability to cause disease in both humans and animals. However, the text does describe some host defenses used to combat enteric infections.
Purpose:The conference was conceived as a forum for interdisciplinary discussions on mechanisms of enteric disease. It was intended to stimulate ideas and promote collaboration among the participating scientists. The book was an attempt to gather this material and share the findings of this conference with a larger population. Because enteral infections are a common and potentially devastating problem, the text provides information from experts in this field for the interested reader. Although seemingly the intent of the conference, and therefore presumably the text, no attempt was made to include provocative discussions or collaborative ideas that may have occurred at the conference.
Audience:The book is intended for basic scientists working in the area of enteric infection and targets a reader with more than a core knowledge in this field. Topics cover animal and human enteric disease. Although there are many potentially exciting areas of research, the book as written offers little practical utility for the clinician.
Features:The electron micrographs and histology photographsare exceptional and help depict visually the pathogenesis of enteric infections. The remainder of the illustrations, as a whole, are less exciting, and there are several stretches of text that are not illustrated. The articles are well supported by current and appropriate references. Individually, many of the chapters in this text offer new and exciting insight into the pathogenesis of enteric disease and hint at potential treatment options. Alternatively, other sections deal with issues that are so specialized or technologically sophisticated as to limit the general appeal of the book.
Assessment:Although the papers and reviews in this book share a common theme, they lack a narrative flow, and thus are cumbersome to read. Additionally, individual articles rely on references to provide the background and in-depth discussion for many of the studies. This format relies on previous familiarity with the subject and is not an effective way to transfer information to readers attempting to increase their knowledge base.
Booknews
A cross-disciplinary treatment of diseases of the small intestine in both animals and humans. Among the 68 topics are comparative histopathology, a chick model for studying Attaching and Effacing "Escherichia coli", the fermentation and growth response of a primary poultry isolate of "Salmonella typhimurium" grown under strict anaerobic conditions in continuous culture and in amino acid- limited batch culture, the carbon dioxide regulation of virulence genes, the astrovirus signal that induces (-1) ribosomal frameshifting, and the selection of swine resistant to F4 positive "Escherichia coli". Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Preface. Intestinal lymphoepithelial communication; F. Shanahan. Bacterial translocation from the gastrointestinal tract; R.D. Berg. Interference with virus and bacteria replication by the tissue specific expression of antibodies and interfering molecules; L. Enjuanes, et al. Comparative pathogenesis of enteric viral infections of swine; L.J. Saif. Comparative pathology of bacterial enteric disease of swine; R.A. Moxley, G.E. Duhamel. Insulin modulates intestinal response of suckling mice to the Escherichia coli Heat-stable enterotoxin; A.M. Al-Majali, et al. Reproduction of lesions and clinical signs with CNF2-producing Escherichia coli in neonatal calves; S. Van Bost, J. Mainli. The locus for enterocyte effacement (LEE) of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) from dogs and cats; F. Goffaux, et al. Age-dependent variation in the density and affinity of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin receptors in mice; A.M. Al-Majali, et al. K88 adhesions of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and their porcine enterocyte receptors; D.H. Francis, et al. Edema Disease as a model for systemic disease induced by shiga toxin-producing E. coli; N.A. Cornick, et al. Ultrastructure and DNA Fragmentation analysis of arterioles in swine infected with shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli; I. Matise, et al. Pathogenesis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on weaned calves; E.A. Dean-Nystrom, et al. Distribution of a novel locus called paa (porcine attaching and effacing associated) among enteric Escherichia coli; H. An, et al. Potentiation of the effectiveness of Lactobacillus caseit in the prevention of E. coli induced diarrhea in conventional and gnotobiotic pigs; A. Bomba. Recovery from colonic infection elicits serum IgG antibodies to specific Serpulina pilosicoli outer membrane antigens (SPOMA); P. Zhang, et al. Motility-regulated mucin association of Serpulina pilosicoli, the agent of colonic spirochetosis of humans and animals; N.A. Witters, G.E. Duhamel. Coiling phagocytosis is the predominant mechanism for uptake of the colonic spirochetosis bacterium Serpulina pilosicoli by human monocytes; X. Cheng, et al. Identification of proteins required for the internalization of Campylobacter jejuni into cultured mammalian cells; M.E. Konkel, et al. Secretion of Campylobacter jejuni Cia Proteins is Contact Dependent; V. Riveral-Amill, M.E. Konkel. Codon usage in the A/T-rich bacterium Campylobacter jejuni; S.A. Gray, M.E. Konkel. Prevalence of Campylobacter, salmonella, and Arcobacter species at slaughter in market age pigs; R.B. Harvey, et al. Cryptosporidium parvum gene discovery; M.S. Abraham. Norepinephrine stimulates in vitro growth but does not increase in vivo pathogenicity of Salmonella choleraesuis; J.C. Niefeld, et al. Of mice, calves and men: Comparison of the mouse typhoid model with other Salmonella infections; R.M. Tsolis, et al. Sips, Sops and SPI but not stn influence Salmonella enteropathogenesis; T.S. Wallis, et al. A preliminary survey of antibiotic resistance of Salmonella in market-age swine; L.A. Farrington, et al. Prophylactic administration of immune lymphokine derived from T cells of Salmonella enteritidis-immune pigs: Protection against Salmonella choleraesuis organ invasion and cecal colonization in weaned pigs; K.J. Genovese, et al. Sialic acid dependence and independence of group A rotaviruses; T.B. Kuhlenschmidt, et al.
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