The Mechanisms of Atmospheric Oxidation of the Alkenes

The Mechanisms of Atmospheric Oxidation of the Alkenes

by Jack G. Calvert, R. Atkinson, J. A. Kerr, Sasha Madronich
     
 

The formation of smog in urban atmospheres involves the interaction of sunlight with an air mixture containing nitrogen oxides and reactive hydrocarbons — the most reactive class of these hydrocarbons being alkenes. This important new book, by a team of leading atmospheric chemists, reviews and evaluates the existing literature on the atmospheric chemistry of

Overview

The formation of smog in urban atmospheres involves the interaction of sunlight with an air mixture containing nitrogen oxides and reactive hydrocarbons — the most reactive class of these hydrocarbons being alkenes. This important new book, by a team of leading atmospheric chemists, reviews and evaluates the existing literature on the atmospheric chemistry of these compounds, focusing on the search for a more quantitative understanding of the phenomenon which can then be applied to control methods. It includes detailed examinations of the reactions of alkenes and even suggests areas for further laboratory studies. This book is ideal for climatologists, meteorologists, and scientists studying the chemistry of the atmosphere and can also serve as a valuable text for graduate courses in atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric science.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The main chapters. . .are extremely valuable to the specialists working in the filed of atmospheric photochemistry and related modeling, for reaction kineticists as well as modelers studying city plumes to the effect of biogenic emissions. For these the thoroughly and comprehensively proficient review on the mechanisms of atmospheric oxidation of the alkenes is highly recommended."—Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195131772
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
04/06/2000
Pages:
560
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, Colorado

University of California, Riverside

University of Birmingham

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Max-Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz

Ford Scientific Research Laboratory, Dearborn, Michigan

ENVIRON, Navato, California

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