Medea

( 3 )

Overview

Medea, Princess of Colchis, is a priestess of Hecate, Three Named, Lady of Phantoms. She is the custodian of the wood in which the Golden Fleece is hung. She alone can tame the giant serpent which guards the grove. And then Jason and his Argonauts come along, and she falls catastophically in love. She helps him steal the Golden Fleece ans sails with him to claim his throne. And that's when things go wrong... and she must attempt to reclaim her ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $9.03   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Medea

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

Medea, Princess of Colchis, is a priestess of Hecate, Three Named, Lady of Phantoms. She is the custodian of the wood in which the Golden Fleece is hung. She alone can tame the giant serpent which guards the grove. And then Jason and his Argonauts come along, and she falls catastophically in love. She helps him steal the Golden Fleece ans sails with him to claim his throne. And that's when things go wrong... and she must attempt to reclaim her humanity through abandoment, murder, grief and heavy seas.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Australian author Greenwood retells the story of Jason, Medea, and the quest for the Golden Fleece in a historical every bit as good as her recent Egyptian historical thriller, Out of the Black Land. The narration alternates between Medea, the priestess of the ancient Greek goddess Hekate who betrayed her people and beliefs out of love for Jason, and Nauplius, Jason’s oldest friend. The main action shifts back and forth between Medea’s upbringing (including the beginning of her affiliation with the dark goddess) and that of Nauplius and Jason, first seen under the tutelage of the centaur Cheiron. Greenwood offers interesting riffs on familiar figures of myth, and impressively buttresses her biggest departure from the usual story in a scholarly afterword. She also makes the most of the dramatic potential in the journey of the Argo through dangers that anticipate Odysseus’s perilous return home after the Trojan War. The Medea-centric sections serve as a welcome counterpoint to Robert Graves’s Hercules, My Shipmate. (June)
Library Journal
Medea, princess of Colchis, was promised to the dark goddess of destruction, Hekate, at an early age. Acting as priestess to the goddess and tamer of the giant serpent that guarded the fabled Golden Fleece, she expected to live a life of celibacy and service. Jason, prince of Iolkos, was raised by centaurs in the forests removed from the power centers of his island state until he was old enough to claim his father's throne. But first he had to steal the Golden Fleece. After commissioning a ship and hiring a motley band of heroes known as the Argonauts, Jason sails off in search of his prize, unaware that his true fate is to meet, love and, eventually, discard Medea for another woman. What most casual readers of classical literature supposedly know is that Medea murdered her own children. But did she? VERDICT In the first volume of her "Delphic Women" historical series set in ancient Greece, Greenwood has taken the ultimate dysfunctional mother and created a character of depth and complexity who betrayed and was betrayed, was lost and, ultimately, redeemed. Greenwood, a prolific and popular writer in her native Australia, is best known here for her humorous Phryne Fisher and Corrina Chapman mysteries. Readers who enjoy such literary reinterpretations of classical myths as Ursula Le Guin's Lavinia or Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad will snap up Greenwood's fresh take.—Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage P.L., AK
From the Publisher
"Between 1995 and 1997, Greenwood, the Australian creator of Phryne Fisher and (later) Corinna Chapman, wrote three novels under the umbrella title Delphic Women, retelling stories from Greek mythology from new angles. Medea, published in 1997 in Australia, was the third of the books, but it’s the first to see publication in the U.S. The author explores the legend of Medea—betrayed wife of the adventurer Jason and murderer of her own children—from a modern-day perspective. The story is told by two narrators: Nauplios, one of Jason’s Argonauts, and Medea herself, thus allowing Greenwood to relate events that are separated by vast physical distances in their chronological order. The prose is a bit clunky, but the story is compelling. The main conceit, that these ancient mythological creatures and events were actually real, is risky, but Greenwood makes us believe in centaurs, golden fleeces, and whatnot. She also makes us believe that Medea might have been mistreated by history, that the true story of the woman is perhaps even more astounding than the myth. Compared to Greenwood’s more well-known fiction, this book is a bit of a curiosity, but it’s definitely worth checking out."—Booklist

The well-known stories of Medea, Jason and the Argonauts are based on widely differing legends. Now it’s Medea’s turn to speak. Greenwood’s Medea is a priestess of Hecate and a princess of Colchis, in what will become the modern-day Republic of Georgia....The first of her three Delphic Women series to be available in the United States is an enthralling, sensual, tragic tale packed with historical detail.—Kirkus Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
A feminist take on Greek legend. The well-known stories of Medea, Jason and the Argonauts are based on widely differing legends. Now it's Medea's turn to speak. Greenwood's Medea is a priestess of Hecate and a princess of Colchis, in what will become the modern-day Republic of Georgia. She has learned well the teachings of her tutor, the sour Trioda, and is used to a good deal of freedom as she roams the area, always accompanied by her two black hounds. From Argonaut Nauplios' narration, we learn of the difficulties faced by the heroes who accompany Jason in his quest for the Golden Fleece, his ticket to reclaim his rightful inheritance. After harrowing adventures, the Argonauts arrive in Colchis, where Medea's father, Aetes, sets Jason impossible tasks to acquire the fleece. Medea instantly falls in love with the charismatic Jason and secretly helps him when he promises to marry her and be forever faithful. When Aetes reneges on his promise, Medea flees with the Argonauts, aiding them on the dangerous trip home. Even though Jason proves to be a weak and faithless husband, Medea continues to help him in his fight to become king. Using her skills as a sorceress earns her the enmity of the Corinthians and brings about the death of her children in a manner far different from legend. Nauplios, who has loved her from afar, remains faithful in her time of despair. Greenwood, best known for her Phryne Fisher mysteries, has written historical novels as well (Out of the Black Land, 2013, etc.). The first of her three Delphic Women series to be available in the United States is an enthralling, sensual, tragic tale packed with historical detail.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781464201455
  • Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press
  • Publication date: 6/4/2013
  • Series: Meda Series , #1
  • Pages: 250
  • Sales rank: 1,008,985
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Kerry Greenwood was born so long ago that the internet was called 'books'. She is the author of many novels.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 27, 2013

    This is my second review for this book. The first was posted on

    This is my second review for this book. The first was posted on the previously published version and seems to have disappeared.
    Greenwood offers up a new theory to the popular yet unproven myth/speculation that Medea killed her own children ( the speculation was helped along by Euripides written version of the events). Given the remnants of hearsay and evidence read through the frame of reference handed down by Euripides, it is possible that the maternal filicide supposedly comitted by Medea never happened.
    I would also like to take a moment to say what an utter self loving and treacherous male Jason was. His golden reputation doesn't shine very brightly in this version of events.
    He betrays her trust more than once and yet she still throws her lot in with him.
    Greenwood weaves the supposed sorcery of women of that time, they tended to be healers something often mistaken for witchcraft, in a way that makes situational sense.
    One of my favourite characters was Herakles. Old trustworthy Herakles with a pure heart and the soul of a warrior.
    It is written in a way that combines mythology, history with fictional elements without becoming a dry academic rehash.
    I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2013

    U write toonmuch bro XD

    Idk wut to.put here

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 23, 2014

    ??

    Text won't go smaller than huge. Impossible to read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)