Medical Sociology / Edition 10

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Overview

Medical Sociology, 10th edition examines the classic and contemporary literature in medical sociology aimed at developing and understanding the most important issues and research questions asked today.  The text contains boxes with illustrations of important points and websites thus providing further information about relevant health topics.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Cockerham (U. of Alabama-Birmingham) introduces students to the branch of sociology that investigates the social causes and consequences of health and illness, presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings. The eighth edition, updating earlier ones from 1978-98, incorporates current issues, debates, and findings. The bibliography is extensive, and each chapter ends with a list of relevant Internet sites. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131729247
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 6/9/2006
  • Series: MySearchLab Series for Sociology Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 10
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

The field of medical sociology has undergone considerable change since the first edition of this textbook appeared in 1978. At that time, much of the research in medical sociology was dependent upon the sponsorship of physicians, and a clear division of labor existed between sociologists working in academic departments in universities and those working in health institutions. Today, that situation has changed drastically. Medical sociology is no longer highly dependent on the medical profession for funding or focus—although a strong alliance continues to exist in many cases. Medical sociologists exercise their craft in an increasingly independent manner, either working with a greater degree of partnership with health care professionals or functioning as medicine's critics should the situation warrant it. Furthermore, research and teaching in medical sociology in both universities and health institutions are increasingly similar in the application of theory and usefulness in addressing problems relevant to clinical practice. In sum, medical sociology has evolved into a mature, objective, and independent field of study and work.

Medical sociology has also experienced significant growth worldwide in numbers of practitioners. In many countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Singapore, medical sociologists are either the largest or one of the largest specialty groups in sociology. The European Society for Health and Medical Sociology is a large and active professional society, as are the medical sociology sections of the American, British, and German sociologicalassociations. In 1999, the American and British medical sociology sections held their first joint meeting at London University's Royal Holloway College. Elsewhere, the Japanese Society of Health and Medical Sociology is working to further develop the field in its nation, while medical sociologists in Latin America hold regional conferences on a regular basis and have their own Spanish-language journals.

Numerous books, journals, college and university courses, medical programs, and lecture series in medical sociology now exist in different parts of the world. This textbook, for example, has been translated into Chinese by Yang Hui and Zhang Tuohong of Beijing Medical University and published by Huaxia Publishing House in Beijing. In the United States, several universities offer specialties in medical sociology, while two universities, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of California at San Francisco—both with large medical campuses—offer doctorates in medical sociology. Columbia University in New York City offers a combined Ph.D. program in sociology and public health, while medical sociology has traditionally been the major focus in sociology departments at the University of Kentucky and the University of Miami (Florida). Additionally, there are departments of social medicine, which include medical sociologists, at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as McGill University in Montreal.

The principal goal of this textbook since its inception has been to introduce students to medical sociology by presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings in the field. This edition—the eighth—continues this approach. The intent is to identify and discuss the most current issues, debates, and findings in medical sociology.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The material contained in the pages of this book is my own responsibility in terms of perspective, scope, and style of presentation. Nevertheless, I am deeply grateful to several people for their assistance in preparing the eight editions of this book. I would like to acknowledge the insightful comments of those colleagues who reviewed all or part of this work throughout the revision process. For sharing their views and helping to improve the quality of this book, my appreciation goes to Melvin Barber, Florida A&M University; Paul Berzina, County College of Morris; Deirdre Bowen, University of Washington; Herbert Bynder, University of Colorado; Robert Clark, Midwestern State University; John Collette, University of Utah; Spencer Condie, Brigham Young University; Morton Creditor, University of Kansas Medical Center; Norman Denzin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Karen A. Donahue, Hanover College; Barry Edmonston, Cornell University; Eliot Freidson, New York University; Reed Geertsen, Utah State University; Sharon Guten, Case Western Reserve University; Joseph Jones, Portland State University; Daniel J. Klenow, North Dakota State University; Sol Levine, Harvard University and the New England Medical Center; Richard C. Ludtke, University of North Dakota; Robert Terry Russell, College of St. Francis; Alexander Rysman, Northeastern University; Jeffrey Salloway, University of New Hampshire; Anne Saunders, College of St. Francis; Neil Smelser, Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; and George J. Warheit, University of Miami (Florida). I would also like to thank three doctoral students in medical sociology at UAB who provided important assistance in the preparation of this edition: Sara Daum, Chris Snead, and Garrison Thompson.

William C. Cockerham
Birmingham, Alabama

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Table of Contents

Preface
1 Medical Sociology 1
2 Epidemiology 19
3 The Social Demography of Health 40
4 Social Stress 72
5 Health Behavior and Lifestyles 94
6 Illness Behavior 118
7 The Sick Role 141
8 Healing Options 167
9 Doctor-Patient Interaction 185
10 Physicians 207
11 The Physician in a Changing Society 229
12 Nurses, Physician Assistants, Pharmacists, and Midwives 246
13 Hospitals 267
14 Health Care Delivery and Social Policy in the United States 289
15 Health Care in Developed Countries 313
16 Health Care in Former Socialist, Socialist, and Developing Countries 343
References 369
Photo Credits 407
Name Index 408
Subject Index 415
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Preface

The field of medical sociology has undergone considerable change since the first edition of this textbook appeared in 1978. At that time, much of the research in medical sociology was dependent upon the sponsorship of physicians, and a clear division of labor existed between sociologists working in academic departments in universities and those working in health institutions. Today, that situation has changed drastically. Medical sociology is no longer highly dependent on the medical profession for funding or focus—although a strong alliance continues to exist in many cases. Medical sociologists exercise their craft in an increasingly independent manner, either working with a greater degree of partnership with health care professionals or functioning as medicine's critics should the situation warrant it. Furthermore, research and teaching in medical sociology in both universities and health institutions are increasingly similar in the application of theory and usefulness in addressing problems relevant to clinical practice. In sum, medical sociology has evolved into a mature, objective, and independent field of study and work.

Medical sociology has also experienced significant growth worldwide in numbers of practitioners. In many countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Singapore, medical sociologists are either the largest or one of the largest specialty groups in sociology. The European Society for Health and Medical Sociology is a large and active professional society, as are the medical sociology sections of the American, British, and German sociological associations. In 1999, the Americanand British medical sociology sections held their first joint meeting at London University's Royal Holloway College. Elsewhere, the Japanese Society of Health and Medical Sociology is working to further develop the field in its nation, while medical sociologists in Latin America hold regional conferences on a regular basis and have their own Spanish-language journals.

Numerous books, journals, college and university courses, medical programs, and lecture series in medical sociology now exist in different parts of the world. This textbook, for example, has been translated into Chinese by Yang Hui and Zhang Tuohong of Beijing Medical University and published by Huaxia Publishing House in Beijing. In the United States, several universities offer specialties in medical sociology, while two universities, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of California at San Francisco—both with large medical campuses—offer doctorates in medical sociology. Columbia University in New York City offers a combined Ph.D. program in sociology and public health, while medical sociology has traditionally been the major focus in sociology departments at the University of Kentucky and the University of Miami (Florida). Additionally, there are departments of social medicine, which include medical sociologists, at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as McGill University in Montreal.

The principal goal of this textbook since its inception has been to introduce students to medical sociology by presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings in the field. This edition—the eighth—continues this approach. The intent is to identify and discuss the most current issues, debates, and findings in medical sociology.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The material contained in the pages of this book is my own responsibility in terms of perspective, scope, and style of presentation. Nevertheless, I am deeply grateful to several people for their assistance in preparing the eight editions of this book. I would like to acknowledge the insightful comments of those colleagues who reviewed all or part of this work throughout the revision process. For sharing their views and helping to improve the quality of this book, my appreciation goes to Melvin Barber, Florida A&M University; Paul Berzina, County College of Morris; Deirdre Bowen, University of Washington; Herbert Bynder, University of Colorado; Robert Clark, Midwestern State University; John Collette, University of Utah; Spencer Condie, Brigham Young University; Morton Creditor, University of Kansas Medical Center; Norman Denzin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Karen A. Donahue, Hanover College; Barry Edmonston, Cornell University; Eliot Freidson, New York University; Reed Geertsen, Utah State University; Sharon Guten, Case Western Reserve University; Joseph Jones, Portland State University; Daniel J. Klenow, North Dakota State University; Sol Levine, Harvard University and the New England Medical Center; Richard C. Ludtke, University of North Dakota; Robert Terry Russell, College of St. Francis; Alexander Rysman, Northeastern University; Jeffrey Salloway, University of New Hampshire; Anne Saunders, College of St. Francis; Neil Smelser, Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; and George J. Warheit, University of Miami (Florida). I would also like to thank three doctoral students in medical sociology at UAB who provided important assistance in the preparation of this edition: Sara Daum, Chris Snead, and Garrison Thompson.

William C. Cockerham
Birmingham, Alabama

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