Medieval America: Cultural Influences of Christianity in the Law and Public Policy

Overview

Well into the twenty-first century, the United States remains one of the most highly religious industrial democracies on earth. Recent Gallup surveys suggest that 76 percent of Americans believe that the Bible is divinely inspired or the direct word of God. In Medieval America, Andrew M Koch and Paul H. Gates, Jr. offer a thoughtful examination of how this strong religious feeling, coupled with Christian doctrine, affects American political debates and collective practices and surveying the direct and indirect ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $30.75   
  • New (4) from $30.75   
  • Used (1) from $34.98   
Medieval America: Cultural Influences of Christianity in the Law and Public Policy

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$24.49
BN.com price
(Save 30%)$34.99 List Price

Overview

Well into the twenty-first century, the United States remains one of the most highly religious industrial democracies on earth. Recent Gallup surveys suggest that 76 percent of Americans believe that the Bible is divinely inspired or the direct word of God. In Medieval America, Andrew M Koch and Paul H. Gates, Jr. offer a thoughtful examination of how this strong religious feeling, coupled with Christian doctrine, affects American political debates and collective practices and surveying the direct and indirect influence of religion and faith on American political culture.

Koch and Gates open a more critical dialogue on the political influence of religion in American politics, showing that people’s faith shapes their political views and the policies they support. Even with secular structures and processes, a democratic regime will reflect the belief patterns distributed among the public. Delving into a perspicacious analysis of the religious components in current practices in education, the treatment of political symbols, crime and punishment, the human body, and democratic politics, they contend that promoting and maintaining a free, open, and tolerant society requires the necessary limitation of religious influence in the domains of law and policy. Readers interested in religion and politics will find much to discuss in this incisive exploration of Christian beliefs and their impact on American political discourse.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
This book examines the ways that religious beliefs affect the development of law and public policy in the US. Koch and Gates (both, Appalachian State Univ.) adopt the position that US public policy is developed through conflict between an in-group and an out-group. When the in-group is Christian, the public policies produced will have a strong Christian component. In chapter 1, the authors present their argument that there is a persistent element in US culture that can be considered medieval. Medieval culture is pre-modern and its ideology is based in religious truths and universality. The remainder of the book examines the history of public policies that are created by the influence of religion in the political sphere. Chapter 2 describes the contours of the debate over teaching evolution in public schools. Chapter 3 examines the development of the US flag as a quasi-religious icon. Religious influences on crime and punishment are the focus of chapter 4. Chapter 5 considers the impact of religious views on the functions of the human body. The final chapter emphasizes the authors' argument that their work is not anti-spiritual, but anti-dogmatic. US public policy should be grounded in modern concepts, not ancient writings. Summing Up: Recommended.
Choice
This book examines the ways that religious beliefs affect the development of law and public policy in the US. Koch and Gates (both, Appalachian State Univ.) adopt the position that US public policy is developed through conflict between an in-group and an out-group. When the in-group is Christian, the public policies produced will have a strong Christian component. In chapter 1, the authors present their argument that there is a persistent element in US culture that can be considered medieval. Medieval culture is pre-modern and its ideology is based in religious truths and universality. The remainder of the book examines the history of public policies that are created by the influence of religion in the political sphere. Chapter 2 describes the contours of the debate over teaching evolution in public schools. Chapter 3 examines the development of the US flag as a quasi-religious icon. Religious influences on crime and punishment are the focus of chapter 4. Chapter 5 considers the impact of religious views on the functions of the human body. The final chapter emphasizes the authors' argument that their work is not anti-spiritual, but anti-dogmatic. US public policy should be grounded in modern concepts, not ancient writings. Summing Up: Recommended.
Matthew D. Bunker
Medieval America is a fascinating and insightful analysis of the intersection of religious thought and the law. Contrasting the worldview of religious doctrine with that of the Enlightenment tradition, Professors Koch and Gates astutely tease out the often subtle influence of religion on public policy and on the development of legal doctrine. From flag desecration statutes to controversies over evolution and sexuality, this work provides a thoughtful and highly accessible look at a vital topic.
Nancy Love
In Medieval America, Andrew Koch and Paul Gates explore the continuing tensions between religious and scientific worldviews in American politics. Their argument will intrigue and trouble all who would defend American democracy against its increasingly vocal “medieval” critics.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739188101
  • Publisher: Lexington Books
  • Publication date: 10/16/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 286
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew M. Koch is professor of political philosophy at the Department of Government and Justice Studies at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina.

Paul H. Gates, Jr. is professor of communication law in the Department of Communication at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
Chapter 1: Medievalism in the American Context
Chapter 2: Science, Religion, and Education: The Legal and Cultural Conflicts over the Teaching of Evolution in the United States
Chapter 3: Flag Fetish: Creating a Secular Icon in a Modern Context
Chapter 4: Religion, Law, and Criminal Justice
Chapter 5: Christianity and Liberal Individualism: The Battle over Control of the Human Body
Chapter 6: Religion, Culture, and Democratic Values
Bibliography
Index
About the Authors

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)