Medieval Period and the Renaissance

Medieval Period and the Renaissance

by Briony Ryles, Derek (EDT) Hall, Lindsey (EDT) Lowe, Tim (EDT) Harris
     
 

While the decline and final fall of the Roman Empire temporarily halted the progress of European science, technology progressed in leaps and bounds, not least in China and the Arab world. Then, beginning in the 14th century in Italy, there was a rebirth, or 'renaissance', of learning.

This book contains:

Clear text, photographs, and diagrams explain the

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Overview

While the decline and final fall of the Roman Empire temporarily halted the progress of European science, technology progressed in leaps and bounds, not least in China and the Arab world. Then, beginning in the 14th century in Italy, there was a rebirth, or 'renaissance', of learning.

This book contains:

Clear text, photographs, and diagrams explain the history of technological advance

Sidebars explain the relevance of concepts to the science curriculum

Many glossary terms explained on the page

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Dawna Lisa Buchanan
One in a series of six, this text book offers small, dense bites of information about advances in technology from the beginning of the Common Era to 1625. The short, colorful sections offer information about diverse advances in engineering, technology, agriculture, mathematics, civil construction, printing, exploration, astronomy and energy. It also addresses the history and the context of each. Formatting includes color coded inserts—green for short, descriptive narratives, blue for curriculum connections and grey for glossary information. None of the sections are long—most are three to five pages, (the longest is only eight) and the photographs are well selected and professional. Illustrations also include drawings, reproductions of historical prints, maps, and graphs. It would appear to appeal to reluctant students in these compact overviews of the advances of the period. However, even fluent readers will encounter challenging language, such as "ephemerides—the positions of the Sun, the Moon, and planets " (pg. 8) and "moxibustion—burning cones of substances on the skin" (pg. 9) which are not mentioned again in the glossary at the back of the book and are only referenced within text. This suggests it might be better used with advanced students, or with support for less successful students. It certainly covers interesting content. We learn about the mathematicians who gave us the decimal system and the slide rule. We are introduced to the impact of Chinese, Arabic and European thought on the sciences. Some readers may be surprised to learn that the potato originated in South America. There is a sturdy, easy-to-reference index and quick reference timelines divided into three main categories: Technology, Physical/Life Sciences and Astronomy, and Math. The content is beautifully aligned with State and National Science and Technology Education Standards up to grade 12. For example, in the discussion of guns and gunpowder, the curriculum box in blue states "Students should be able to describe the interrelationships between temperature and the volume of gases" (pg. 61). The book would make an excellent supplement to classroom materials. It offers succinct information about each topic. Reviewer: Dawna Lisa Buchanan

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933834849
Publisher:
Brown Bear Books/Joe Hollander
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Curriculum Connections: Technology Through the Ages Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.40(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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