Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
  • Meet Wild Boars
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Meet Wild Boars

4.0 3
by Meg Rosoff, Sophie Blackall
     
 

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Meet Wild Boars! Or maybe you better not. After all, they are dirty and smelly, bad-tempered and rude. They might try to fool you, but don't worry, you won't believe them. There's no such thing as a nice wild boar. Hmmm.
This insufferable gang of boars will mess up your house and set a very bad example indeed. If you are foolish enough to fall in love with them

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Overview

Meet Wild Boars! Or maybe you better not. After all, they are dirty and smelly, bad-tempered and rude. They might try to fool you, but don't worry, you won't believe them. There's no such thing as a nice wild boar. Hmmm.
This insufferable gang of boars will mess up your house and set a very bad example indeed. If you are foolish enough to fall in love with them, they will break your heart (and most of your furniture). So don't say we didn't warn you!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Bad behavior is utterly unacceptable, of course-but it sure makes for a terrific spectator sport. That's the mindset Rosoff (How I Live Now) and Blackall (Ruby's Wish) expertly tap into as they present four incorrigible boars named Boris, Morris, Horace and Doris. "If you try to help Horace with his mittens, he will make a nasty smell and snort with laughter. Snort snort snort," writes Rosoff, as Blackall shows the boar assuming a pose of civil disobedience in the cubby area of a classroom, a cloud of green gas expelling from his behind. And if a boar were invited over for a playdate and acted like a helpless shrinking violet who sought the comfort of the host's favorite toy, beware: "Given half a chance (or even less) Doris will eat your very best whale, flippers and all." Blackall's hulking, hairy boars-each adorned in comically ill-fitting clothing-make a wonderful visual articulation of and counterpoint to Rosoff's arch, mock-cautionary prose. In fact, they're so vivid in their steely-eyed determination to wreak comic havoc that the book's reader surrogates-a boy and girl who bear witness to and act as foils for all the boars' shenanigans-pale in comparison (the children's oddly flat, almost paper-doll mien does not help, either). Besides, youngsters don't really need any cues on how to project themselves into scenarios such as these-they'll relish tut-tutting such an uncouth crew, while secretly delighting in the boars' unmitigated chutzpah. Ages 3-8. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-In this silly cautionary tale, Rosoff presents the catastrophic results of friendships with wild boars that are "dirty and smelly, bad-tempered and rude." Horace will "cut the strings off your puppets" and "make fun of your feet," Morris shares his fleas, Boris leaves a smelly trail of destruction, and Doris is "uglier than an Ugli fruit." Like cunning children without manners, these creatures lack the ability to say "excuse me" or "please"; they break toys, stomp on treats, soak in the toilet, and devour treasures. It's clear they can not be trusted. The wily quartet appears dressed for play in cartoon displays of their unmannered excesses. Large, gouache illustrations follow the snort, stomp, and smell of the boars viewed either from a safe vantage point or eyeball to eyeball. The artist's attention to detail underscores the tiniest hairs and the grimiest clothes, down to the minute bow on Doris's head. The animals' eyes reveal their true deceitful nature in encounters with trusting children. An entertaining choice for independent reading or group sharing.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Poster piggies for bad behavior, Boris, Morris, Horace and Doris rampage through this cautionary introduction: "They are dirty and smelly, bad-tempered and rude. Do you like them? Never mind. They do not like you either,"-as they proceed to demonstrate with a series of young humans who try to make friendly overtures. Blackall depicts a quartet of long-nosed porkers, on all fours but in human dress, gleefully smashing offered toys and snacks while leaving messes, both mentionable and un- , in school and domestic settings. Breaking occasionally into rhyme, Rosoff details the havoc, then closes with a warning that, even when newborn and cute, boars will be boars. Shelve this next to Nicole Rubel's Grody's Not So Golden Rules (2003) and like contrarian essays; young readers will be delighted to meet this fearsome foursome, and inspired to look around for their real-life counterparts. (Picture book. 6-8)
Starred Review Booklist
Bitingly funny and deeply satisfying. . . . Let's hope for more from this disgustingly delightful group. Wild, they may be. Bores, they are not.
Starred Review The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
Introduce this book at storytime and be prepared for multiple requests for repeats.
"Fab Finds for Kids" People
Bracingly ill-mannered, the boars who run amok in this clever picture book make kid friends seem . . . tame.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805074888
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.38(w) x 10.18(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD850L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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