Meeting the Enemy: American Exceptionalism and International Law

Overview

Since its founding, the United States has defined itself as the supreme protector of freedom throughout the world, pointing to its Constitution as the model of law to ensure democracy at home and to protect human rights internationally. Although the United States has consistently emphasized the importance of the international legal system, it has simultaneously distanced itself from many established principles of international law and the institutions that implement them. In fact, the American government has ...

See more details below
Paperback
$24.78
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$27.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $16.67   
  • New (4) from $20.42   
  • Used (4) from $16.67   
Meeting the Enemy: American Exceptionalism and International Law

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$17.49
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$21.25 List Price

Overview

Since its founding, the United States has defined itself as the supreme protector of freedom throughout the world, pointing to its Constitution as the model of law to ensure democracy at home and to protect human rights internationally. Although the United States has consistently emphasized the importance of the international legal system, it has simultaneously distanced itself from many established principles of international law and the institutions that implement them. In fact, the American government has attempted to unilaterally reshape certain doctrines of international law while disregarding others, such as provisions of the Geneva Conventions and the prohibition on torture.

America’s selective self-exemption, Natsu Taylor Saito argues, undermines not only specific legal institutions and norms, but leads to a decreased effectiveness of the global rule of law. Meeting the Enemy is a pointed look at why the United States’ frequent—if selective—disregard of international law and institutions is met with such high levels of approval, or at least complacency, by the American public.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
meeting... is a pointed look at why the United States’ frequent - if selective - disregard of international law and institutions is met with such high levels of approval, or at least complacency, by the American public.” meeting-Los Angeles Daily Journal,

“Much has been written about the theme of American exceptionalism. Few works, however, possess the richness, range and depth of Saito’s superb and timely book, which provides new and disturbing insight into the origins and enduring character of this exceptionalism—and its consequences for America and the world.”
-Antony Anghie,SJ Quinney School of Law, University of Utah

“This book will help readers understand the United State’s contradictory and often shocking role in the international legal community. A violator of international law from the day of its declaration of ‘independence,’ America, as Saito boldly points out, is indeed the enemy to colonized people within and beyond its borders.”
-Sharon H. Venne,Chief Negotiator, Akaitcho Dene First Nation

“Saito has produced a synthesis that is thought-provoking and challenging, and it provides a welcome attempt to place the contemporary moment in the 'war on terror' into a much longer historical frame. Most of all, like all good critical scholarship, scholars and students can look to this book as a way to interrogate one’s commitments about the American Project.” -Law & Politics Book Review

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814771143
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 6/1/2012
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Natsu Taylor Saito is Professor of Law at Georgia State University. She is the author of From Chinese Exclusion to Guantánamo Bay: Plenary Power and the Prerogative State.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: “A Distinctly American Internationalism”
1 Saving Civilization: The War on Terror
2 Civilizing the Other: Colonial Origins of International Law
3 “A City on a Hill”: America as Exception
4 Establishing the Republic: First Principles and American Identity
5 A Manifest Destiny: Colonizing the Continent
6 American Imperial Expansion
7 Making the World Safe for Democracy
8 The New World Order and American Hegemony
9 Confronting American Exceptionalism
Notes
Works Cited
List of Cases
Index
About the Author

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)