Meeting the Ethical Challenges of Leadership: Casting Light or Shadow / Edition 2

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Overview

Meeting the Ethical Challenges of Leadership, Second Edition identifies the unique ethical demands of leadership and equips students to meet those challenges. Written in an informal, accessible style, this book takes an interdisciplinary approach to leadership ethics that will appeal to students from a variety of academic backgrounds. The first of its kind, this text provides students with a variety of ethical perspective and strategies to apply to moral dilemmas and describes tools and techniques for creating positive ethical climates in small group, organizational, and culturally diverse settings.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An "ends justifies the meanness" table of leaders and tactics (e.g., media mogul Ted Turner fired his own son) helps introduce the section probing the shadow side of leadership. With case studies and a boxed feature titled "Leadership ethics at the movies," Johnson (communication, interdisciplinary leadership studies, George Fox U., Newberg, OR) provides a provocative analysis of looking inward at leader's character and combating evil; ethical standards, strategies, and theories; and shaping ethical group and organizational contexts. An instructor's manual is available. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Journal of Moral Education
"Johnson’s revised and expanded edition of this popular and user-friendly textbook continues with the central themes and cases of the first edition, but provides new and relevant examples, original cases studies rooted in recent historical events, and an innovative focus on assessment that should prove helpful to both students and instructors. For readers familiar with the First Edition, this Second Edition is worth the additional investment. Every chapter has at least one new case study and previously cited 126 Book reviews cases have been updated. The relevance and utility of these cases cannot be overstated for they bring a practicality to the text that will make for lively discussion in the classroom. Case studies illuminate ethical principles and lapses in events surrounding Enron, World Com, the World Trade Organization (WTO), Arthur Andersen, sexual abuse perpetrated by clergy, the Air Force Academy, and NASA among others. The cinema also provides a fertile area to tap by way of example, and Johnson mines films such as 'The Insider, The Gathering Storm, Dead Man Walking, The Pianist' and 'Erin Brockovich 'to dramatise salient points. The variety of such broadly chosen examples, derived from current events, should help to make ethics come alive for students in ways that demonstrate the every day importance of ethical leadership. The text is organised into four parts. Part One, ‘The shadow side of leadership’, relies on the Jungian construct of the shadow side of the personality, following the maxim, ‘the brighter the light, the larger the shadow’. Johnson believes that an effective way for leaders to understand how the shadow side might influence their behaviour is to acknowledge existence of shadows forthrightly. Typical shadows cast by leaders include: the abuse of power and privilege; deception; misplaced and broken loyalties; inconsistency and irresponsibility. Any reader with leadership responsibility or even enmeshed in a complex organisation may not be able to resist the temptation to begin self-analysis and organisational scrutiny immediately. Part Two, ‘Looking inward’, the most appealing section for this reviewer, examines why it is that leaders often do more harm than good. The author proffers a variety of views on evil, both personal and systemic, and appeals to a model of forgiveness as a way to break the cycle of institutionalised evil. In response to the many patterns of evil easily discernible in the world, Johnson counsels spirituality and reflection, affirming the value of spiritual disciplines that most readers will find have some resonance with several religious traditions. The interdisciplinary approach here is appealing. Students from a variety of academic backgrounds will find something here that invites further reflection. Part Three, ‘Ethical standards and strategies’, summarises and reviews selections from the knowledge base in ethical theory. Kant, Rawls and Mill are introduced. Discussion of James Mc Gregor Burns, Rost and Greenleaf come in the chapter entitled ‘Normative leadership theories’. This section is unsatisfying in its quick treatment of major ethical treatises. Indeed, the introduction, analysis, comparison and critique of Kant’s categorical imperative are handled in less than two pages and several hundred words. Utilitarianism receives similar treatment. This material might suffice for an introductory course at an early, undergraduate level, but advanced undergraduates and graduate students will arguably require more detail, information and nuance. Part Four, ‘Shaping ethical contexts’, concludes the text with a focus on group dynamics and building an ethical capacity in small groups. The ethical challenges inherent in cultural diversity round out the text, along with an admonition to be wary of ethnocentrism and prejudice. As a classroom text for undergraduate courses in leadership and ethics, it is difficult to find a more comprehensive book that provides both the theoretical background and practical application of ethical theory in one place. Even with the caveat that some Book reviews 127 students will need a stronger intellectual framework, this is a valuable book. Instructors will find the text versatile in this regard, as its organisation allows for either a linear approach from beginning to end or a more creative, theme-based approach. A highly structured table of contents and a detailed subject/author index serve such an end well. A significant contribution to the pedagogy of ethics, this book should continue to enjoy wide usage and popularity. "— Dr Ronald J. Nuzzi
Sara A. Boatman
"While there are lots of books out there about leadership, there is limited in-depth treatment of the ethical dimensions of leadership. I appreciate the decisions that the author made about how to organize the book and I find his choice of the supporting materials carefully selected and presented. I will recommend it to others."
Roger Smitter
"The book succeeds on many levels in providing a values orientation to the topic of leadership. The light and shadow metaphor works especially well. I’m also impressed with the rich use of very contemporary examples. I plan to use the book in my introductory leadership class."
Donald G. Frank
"The author is a noted scholar and the references are appropriate and timely . . . the book is interesting, informative, and a useful contribution to the literature of leadership."
Doctor Journal of Moral Education - Ronald J. Nuzzi
"Johnson’s revised and expanded edition of this popular and user-friendly textbook continues with the central themes and cases of the first edition, but provides new and relevant examples, original cases studies rooted in recent historical events, and an innovative focus on assessment that should prove helpful to both students and instructors. For readers familiar with the First Edition, this Second Edition is worth the additional investment. Every chapter has at least one new case study and previously cited 126 Book reviews cases have been updated. The relevance and utility of these cases cannot be overstated for they bring a practicality to the text that will make for lively discussion in the classroom. Case studies illuminate ethical principles and lapses in events surrounding Enron, World Com, the World Trade Organization (WTO), Arthur Andersen, sexual abuse perpetrated by clergy, the Air Force Academy, and NASA among others. The cinema also provides a fertile area to tap by way of example, and Johnson mines films such as 'The Insider, The Gathering Storm, Dead Man Walking, The Pianist' and 'Erin Brockovich 'to dramatise salient points. The variety of such broadly chosen examples, derived from current events, should help to make ethics come alive for students in ways that demonstrate the every day importance of ethical leadership. The text is organised into four parts. Part One, ‘The shadow side of leadership’, relies on the Jungian construct of the shadow side of the personality, following the maxim, ‘the brighter the light, the larger the shadow’. Johnson believes that an effective way for leaders to understand how the shadow side might influence their behaviour is to acknowledge existence of shadows forthrightly. Typical shadows cast by leaders include: the abuse of power and privilege; deception; misplaced and broken loyalties; inconsistency and irresponsibility. Any reader with leadership responsibility or even enmeshed in a complex organisation may not be able to resist the temptation to begin self-analysis and organisational scrutiny immediately. Part Two, ‘Looking inward’, the most appealing section for this reviewer, examines why it is that leaders often do more harm than good. The author proffers a variety of views on evil, both personal and systemic, and appeals to a model of forgiveness as a way to break the cycle of institutionalised evil. In response to the many patterns of evil easily discernible in the world, Johnson counsels spirituality and reflection, affirming the value of spiritual disciplines that most readers will find have some resonance with several religious traditions. The interdisciplinary approach here is appealing. Students from a variety of academic backgrounds will find something here that invites further reflection. Part Three, ‘Ethical standards and strategies’, summarises and reviews selections from the knowledge base in ethical theory. Kant, Rawls and Mill are introduced. Discussion of James Mc Gregor Burns, Rost and Greenleaf come in the chapter entitled ‘Normative leadership theories’. This section is unsatisfying in its quick treatment of major ethical treatises. Indeed, the introduction, analysis, comparison and critique of Kant’s categorical imperative are handled in less than two pages and several hundred words. Utilitarianism receives similar treatment. This material might suffice for an introductory course at an early, undergraduate level, but advanced undergraduates and graduate students will arguably require more detail, information and nuance. Part Four, ‘Shaping ethical contexts’, concludes the text with a focus on group dynamics and building an ethical capacity in small groups. The ethical challenges inherent in cultural diversity round out the text, along with an admonition to be wary of ethnocentrism and prejudice. As a classroom text for undergraduate courses in leadership and ethics, it is difficult to find a more comprehensive book that provides both the theoretical background and practical application of ethical theory in one place. Even with the caveat that some Book reviews 127 students will need a stronger intellectual framework, this is a valuable book. Instructors will find the text versatile in this regard, as its organisation allows for either a linear approach from beginning to end or a more creative, theme-based approach. A highly structured table of contents and a detailed subject/author index serve such an end well. A significant contribution to the pedagogy of ethics, this book should continue to enjoy wide usage and popularity. "
Journal of Moral Education - Dr Ronald J. Nuzzi
"Johnson’s revised and expanded edition of this popular and user-friendly textbook continues with the central themes and cases of the first edition, but provides new and relevant examples, original cases studies rooted in recent historical events, and an innovative focus on assessment that should prove helpful to both students and instructors. For readers familiar with the First Edition, this Second Edition is worth the additional investment. Every chapter has at least one new case study and previously cited 126 Book reviews cases have been updated. The relevance and utility of these cases cannot be overstated for they bring a practicality to the text that will make for lively discussion in the classroom.
Case studies illuminate ethical principles and lapses in events surrounding Enron, World Com, the World Trade Organization (WTO), Arthur Andersen, sexual abuse perpetrated by clergy, the Air Force Academy, and NASA among others. The cinema also provides a fertile area to tap by way of example, and Johnson mines films such as 'The Insider, The Gathering Storm, Dead Man Walking, The Pianist' and 'Erin Brockovich 'to dramatise salient points. The variety of such broadly chosen examples, derived from current events, should help to make ethics come alive for students in ways that demonstrate the every day importance of ethical leadership.
The text is organised into four parts. Part One, ‘The shadow side of leadership’, relies on the Jungian construct of the shadow side of the personality, following the maxim, ‘the brighter the light, the larger the shadow’. Johnson believes that an effective way for leaders to understand how the shadow side might influence their behaviour is to acknowledge existence of shadows forthrightly. Typical shadows cast by leaders include: the abuse of power and privilege; deception; misplaced and broken loyalties; inconsistency and irresponsibility. Any reader with leadership responsibility or even enmeshed in a complex organisation may not be able to resist the temptation to begin self-analysis and organisational scrutiny immediately.
Part Two, ‘Looking inward’, the most appealing section for this reviewer, examines why it is that leaders often do more harm than good. The author proffers a variety of views on evil, both personal and systemic, and appeals to a model of forgiveness as a way to break the cycle of institutionalised evil. In response to the many patterns of evil easily discernible in the world, Johnson counsels spirituality and reflection, affirming the value of spiritual disciplines that most readers will find have some resonance with several religious traditions. The interdisciplinary approach here is appealing. Students from a variety of academic backgrounds will find something here that invites further reflection.
Part Three, ‘Ethical standards and strategies’, summarises and reviews selections from the knowledge base in ethical theory. Kant, Rawls and Mill are introduced. Discussion of James Mc Gregor Burns, Rost and Greenleaf come in the chapter entitled ‘Normative leadership theories’. This section is unsatisfying in its quick treatment of major ethical treatises. Indeed, the introduction, analysis, comparison and critique of Kant’s categorical imperative are handled in less than two pages and several hundred words. Utilitarianism receives similar treatment. This material might suffice for an introductory course at an early, undergraduate level, but advanced undergraduates and graduate students will arguably require more detail, information and nuance.
Part Four, ‘Shaping ethical contexts’, concludes the text with a focus on group dynamics and building an ethical capacity in small groups. The ethical challenges inherent in cultural diversity round out the text, along with an admonition to be wary of ethnocentrism and prejudice.
As a classroom text for undergraduate courses in leadership and ethics, it is difficult to find a more comprehensive book that provides both the theoretical background and practical application of ethical theory in one place. Even with the caveat that some Book reviews 127 students will need a stronger intellectual framework, this is a valuable book. Instructors will find the text versatile in this regard, as its organisation allows for either a linear approach from beginning to end or a more creative, theme-based approach. A highly structured table of contents and a detailed subject/author index serve such an end well. A significant contribution to the pedagogy of ethics, this book should continue to enjoy wide usage and popularity. "
Diane Chandler
“I do not know of another text that comes close to it . . .This book is one of the best on the market!”
James K. Dittmar
“The best quality of this text is its emphasis on the leader—casting light or shadow. This theme/metaphor challenges the reader to take stock of him/herself with respect to the metaphor and encourages changes, if necessary, to be a ‘light caster.’”
Lee E. Meadows
“For my needs, leadership and ethics, this book delivers in ways that allow me to be an effective instructor on this topic.”
Mary Jane Kuffner-Hirt
“I believe Meeting the Challenges of Ethical Leadership has been a very good basis text for the ethics courses I have taught over the last ten years.”
Alison Antes
“I already utilize the text and my students like it… It has a fairly nice balance between the complexity of the topic and readability and understandability.”
Frederick Brockmeier
“The self-assessments seem particularly popular and insightful.”
Lonnie Inzer
“I use the text now in 4 classes at three colleges with excellent results. The students love this book.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781412905688
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 12/28/2004
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.04 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Craig E. Johnson (Ph D, University of Denver) is professor of Leadership Studies and former director of the Doctor of Business Administration program at George Fox University, Newberg, Oregon. He teaches undergraduate courses in leadership, ethics, and management. Previously he served as chair of the university’s Department of Communication Arts. Johnson is the author of Organizational Ethics: A Practical Approach (also published by SAGE) and co-author, with Michael Z. Hackman, of Leadership: A Communication Perspective. He has published research findings, instructional ideas, and book reviews in The Journal of Leadership Studies, The Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, The Journal of Leadership Education, Academy of Management Learning and Education, The International Leadership Journal, Communication Quarterly, Communication Reports and other journals. Johnson has led and participated in service and educational trips to Kenya, Rwanda, New Zealand, China, Brazil, and Honduras, and has held volunteer leadership posiitons in a variety of religious and nonprofit organizations.

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Table of Contents

1 The leader's light or shadow 9
2 Shadow casters 35
3 The leader's character 65
4 Combating evil 97
5 General ethical perspectives 129
6 Normative leadership theories 157
7 Ethical decision-making formats 187
8 Building an effective, ethical small group 215
9 Creating an ethical organizational climate 245
10 Meeting the ethical challenges of cultural diversity 277
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  • Posted July 25, 2010

    meet the ethical challenges of leadership

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