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Megachange: The World in 2050

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Megachange looks at the forces that have been driving change and where they are headed over the following decades. Its conclusions about how the world will look in 2050...

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Overview

Megachange looks at the forces that have been driving change and where they are headed over the following decades. Its conclusions about how the world will look in 2050 are often surprising, not least in their optimism. Following an introduction, the book is divided into four parts containing 20 chapters that cover everything from health to wealth and religion to outer space.

People and relationships

  • Not quite destiny
  • The health of nations
  • Women's world
  • Friends indeed
  • Cultural revolutions

Heaven and earth

  • Believe it or not
  • Feeling the heat
  • The future of war: the weak become strong
  • Freedom's ragged march
  • Taming Leviathan: the state of the state

Economy and business

  • The age of emerging markets
  • Globalisation, growth and the Asian century
  • The great levelling
  • Schumpeter Inc.
  • Market momentum

Knowledge and progress

  • What (and where) next for science
  • Ad astra
  • The web of knowledge
  • Distance is dead. Long live location
  • Of predictions and progress: more for less

The contributors

Barbara Beck is The Economist's special-reports editor.

Geoffrey Carr is The Economist's science and technology editor.

Philip Coggan is the Buttonwood columnist and capital-markets editor of The Economist. He is the author of The Economist Guide to Hedge Funds and, most recently, Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order.

Simon Cox is The Economist's Asia economics editor.

Tim Cross is a science correspondent at The Economist.

Kenneth Cukier is The Economist's data editor.

Martin Giles is The Economist's US technology correspondent.

Anthony Gottlieb is a New York-based writer. A former executive editor of The Economist, he is the author of The Dream of Reason: A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance.

Robert Lane Greene is The Economist's professional-services correspondent. He also edits "Johnson", The Economist's blog on language, and is the author of You Are What You Speak: Grammar Grouches, Language Laws, and the Politics of Identity.

Charlotte Howard is The Economist's health-care correspondent.

Laza Kekic is director of the Economist Intelligence Unit's Country Forecasting Service.

Edward Lucas edits The Economist's international section. His most recent book is Deception, on East-West espionage.

Zanny Minton Beddoes is The Economist's economics editor.

Oliver Morton is The Economist's briefings editor and was previously energy and environment editor. His most recent book is Eating the Sun: How Plants Power the Planet.

John Parker is The Economist's globalisation editor.

Matt Ridley is a former science and technology editor, Washington bureau chief and United States editor of The Economist. He is the author of several books, including, most recently, The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves.

Ludwig Siegele is The Economist's online business editor. He was previously technology editor.

Matthew Symonds is The Economist's defence and security editor.

Paul Wallace is The Economist's European economics editor. He is the author of Agequake: Riding the Demographic Rollercoaster Shaking Business, Finance and Our World.

Adrian Wooldridge is The Economist's management editor and Schumpeter columnist. He is co-author of several books and, most recently, the author of Masters of Management: How the Business Gurus and Their Ideas Have Changed the World – for Better and for Worse.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118180440
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 3/27/2012
  • Series: Economist Series , #105
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Franklin is executive editor and business-affairs editor of The Economist. He is also the editor of The Economist's annual publication on the year ahead, The World in....

John Andrews has written for The Economist for more than 30 years and is deputy editor of The World in?. He is the author of The Economist Book of Isms.

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Table of Contents

Contributors vii

Introduction: meet megachange xi
Daniel Franklin

Part 1 People and relationships 1

1 Not quite destiny 3
John Parker

2 The health of nations 21
Charlotte Howard

3 Women’s world 36
Barbara Beck

4 Friends indeed 51
Martin Giles

5 Cultural revolutions 63
Robert Lane Greene

Part 2 Heaven and earth 77

6 Believe it or not 79
Anthony Gottlieb

7 Feeling the heat 92
Oliver Morton

8 The future of war: the weak become strong 111
Matthew Symonds

9 Freedom’s ragged march 126
Edward Lucas

10 Taming Leviathan: the state of the state 138
Paul Wallace

Part 3 Economy and business 151

11 The age of emerging markets 153
Simon Cox

12 Globalisation, growth and the Asian century 170
Laza Kekic

13 The great levelling 181
Zanny Minton Beddoes

14 Schumpeter Inc 193
Adrian Wooldridge

15 Market momentum 203
Philip Coggan

Part 4 Knowledge and progress 217

16 What (and where) next for science 219
Geoffrey Carr

17 Ad astra 229
Tim Cross

18 The web of knowledge 241
Kenneth Cukier

19 Distance is dead. Long live location 254
Ludwig Siegele

20 Of predictions and progress: more for less 264
Matt Ridley

Acknowledgements 276

Index 277

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This anthology¿s essays forecast future developments in areas fr

    This anthology’s essays forecast future developments in areas from
    social media to religion. Daniel Franklin, executive editor and business
    affairs editor of The Economist, and John Andrews, a writer for the
    magazine for 30 years, compiled and edited this volume. Since all 20
    writers contribute to The Economist, they share a lucid style and a
    generally aligned conceptual framework. No one can promise accurate
    predictions, but these reporters share deeply informed insights about
    forces that will affect the world by 2050. The result is a useful,
    intriguing mosaic of the near future. The writers clearly explain
    complex concepts as their shared references let one essay build
    synergistically on the next. Readers who already know the contents of
    one essay will turn the page to remark on how startling the next one is.
    getAbstract recommends this collection to futurists, long-term planners,
    and readers interested in social analysis and forecasting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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