A Memoir of the Rev. John Keble

A Memoir of the Rev. John Keble

by John Taylor Coleridge
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally…  See more details below

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290513821
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Pages:
666
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.34(d)

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CHAPTER IV. FINAL EXAMINATION.ELECTION AT ORIEL.UNIVERSITY PRIZES. SIDMOUTH. ORDINATI0NS. FIRST CURACY. TVEBLE passed his final examination in Easter -I V. Term, 1810, and was placed in both First Classes. Up to that time no one had earned this distinction but Sir Robert Peel, with whose examination the University was ringing when I matriculated. Keble's youth, and what seemed, but I believe only seemed, imperfect preparation, made his success the more remarkable. It was a joy to us personally for the love we bore him, and a triumph, too, beyond that which a College always feels for distinction won by one of its members. In our little circle we had known that he had doubted whether he should be able to prepare himself in both lines, and some of that doubt had perhaps spread amongst us as to the result; but both his tutors, Brydges the Mathematical, as well as Cooke, had urged him on, and they judged his powers more accurately than we. I now see from his letters to his father that at the very crisis of his preparation he was also writing both for the Latin and English Verse Prizes. I was not aware of it at the time. He knew, I dare say, that I was competing also, andtherefore made no communication to me. The English Verses I have never .seen; some of the Latin appear in his correspondence with his father, sent to him for his censure. I wish I could have recovered the letters in which he must have announced to his father his success and his disappointment, they would surely have been very interesting. All his letters to his father which I have seen are in the affectionate and unpretending spirit of a boy, open- hearted yet deferential, considerate as to the expense he wasoccasioning, and shewing a strong desire to relieve him from it. With a view to this I find him ...

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