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Memoirs of an American Housewife in Japan
     

Memoirs of an American Housewife in Japan

4.5 2
by Pauline Hager
 

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An American housewife's husband is offered a position in Japan to work on a multinational project. After much soul-searching they accept, and their lives are never the same. From 1994 to 1997, they lived in the countryside in housing specifically designed for Westerners, surrounded with friendly neighbors from The European Union, Canada, Russia Japan and America. Life

Overview

An American housewife's husband is offered a position in Japan to work on a multinational project. After much soul-searching they accept, and their lives are never the same. From 1994 to 1997, they lived in the countryside in housing specifically designed for Westerners, surrounded with friendly neighbors from The European Union, Canada, Russia Japan and America. Life in Japan was a daily challenge and Pauline had to learn to adjust to Japanese customs. She gingerly maneuvers through complicated rules of Japanese social behavior, never knowing when a simple faux pas would be construed as an intolerable violation of proper conduct. At times, she learns the hard way: Wearing the wrong dinner kimono in a Japanese inn, forgetting to put on the proper toilet slippers. Driving on the left side (British style) on narrow, winding roads was a particularly harrowing experience. Grocery shopping for canned or package food and not knowing how to read the labels turns into a guessing game. In spite of these obsticles, life in Japan is rewarding. Eventually Pauline attends night school (Juko/cram school) and learns to ask simple questions and to read signs in Katakana, Japanese characters designed for foreign languages. Japanese living was a challenge, but a close network of Japanese and fellow expatriate friends enabled the Hagers to prevail.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon Reviews - Beth DeRoos
Asia is such a powerhouse area of the world that even if you never visit, you can learn valuable lessons from this book. What is helpful is how she writes in such a way that you feel like you're there.
Wincing when one discovers they have made an error in how they dress for certain occasions, to everyday things like bathrooms, depending on how ones home or hotel in Japan is set up, can be major cultural shock. This book I recommend for those who have Japanese exchange students in their home
Amazon Reviews - Joanna Daneman
Pauline Hager spent 2 years livining in Japan. She samples breakfasts (never giving up a preference to donuts for the traditional rice and fish, which makes her gag), Japanese medicine (no advanced orthopedic surgery, surprising in a land with great health overall.) Pauline has a good way with descriptions and not afraid to state her opinion. The fun details like toilet slippers, kimono customs and the reactions of everday people make this worth reading.I enjoyed a vicarious visit back to Japan.
Amazon Reviews - Catherine Copenhaver
This was fun to read! The book is a nice narrative of how an American housewife adjusted to moving to a completely different country.
I recently read another book by an American expatriate who basically spent the vast majority of it complaining about how painful her time was in Japan. How much more fun to see another person move to Japan, live in a Japanese house, interact with her neighbors and take advantage of the opportunity. Reading her anxieties, how she overcame them was a great trip
Amazon Reviews - Kaitlin Burkard
Memoirs of an American Housewife in Japan is a detailed, straightforward account of how one American woman spent two years living in Japan and how she dealt with the people and strange customs she encountered there. Pauline Hager describes in great detail her home in Japan, her neighbors, and all the places she visits, including other countries in the Far Easth. Hager discusses the language, cuisine, sumo wrestling and more. I would recommend this book to any American planning to live there.
Midwest Book Reviews - Jim Cox
Memoirs Of An American Housewife In Japan is an autobiographical story of Pauline Hager, an amazing American woman, who had to adjust to the completely different culture of Japan when her husband had to work there on a multinational project. Living in housing especially designed for Westerners, and surrounded by friendly neighbors from all over the world, Pauline met the challenges of accepting new ways and of coping with language barriers, strict yet unfamiliar rules of etiquette, and much more

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780741407474
Publisher:
Infinity Publishing
Publication date:
12/28/2001
Pages:
236
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

A native of Clinton, Massachusetts, a graduate of the University of South Carolina, and a longtime resident of Southern California, Pauline Hager presently lives in La Jolla, California with her husband, Randy. Her fascinating and humorous experiences living in Japan, including their travels to other Far Eastern countries, prompted the author to write her memoirs. Her second book Giorgi's Greek Tragedy is a historical novel.

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Memoirs of an American Housewife in Japan 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
An true adventure of a gutsy woman and her husband living in Japan. While her husband worked Pauline socialized and taught children to read English. She had to learn how to drive on streets without being able to read the signs. She had to learn a new culture. She really sparkled in this amazing book of her life in Japan.