The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

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Overview

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes are overshadowed by the event with which they close - the meeting of the great detective and Moriarty, the Napoleon of Crime. Their struggle, seemingly to the death, was to leave many readers desolate at the loss of Holmes, but was also to lead to his immortality as a literary figure.
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Overview

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes are overshadowed by the event with which they close - the meeting of the great detective and Moriarty, the Napoleon of Crime. Their struggle, seemingly to the death, was to leave many readers desolate at the loss of Holmes, but was also to lead to his immortality as a literary figure.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

When The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes was first published in 1894, its author "A. Conan Doyle" couldn't have imagined that this collection of short stories would not only continue to be a resilient backlist bestseller for over a century; it would also become the basis of an upcoming blockbuster movie. While fans await the release of Guy Ritchie's film starring Robert Downey, Jr., and Rachel McAdams, readers can sample the original, which includes stories including "The Musgrove Ritual," "Silver Blaze," and "The Final Problem." (Meanwhile, NOOK Book readers can make their choice among half a dozen eBook versions on this mystery classic.)

barnesandnoble.com - Stefania T.
Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra...Lettura.

Giungo in questi afosi ed estivi istanti al completamento della lettura di circa 1/2 del "Canone", termine che identifica l'intera e completa collezione dei romanzi e dei racconti che vedono protagonista l' "autentico" Sherlock Holmes, quello nato dalla penna di sir Arthur Conan Doyle (distinto da quello "apocrifo", generato dalla discutibile creatività di altri scrittori post-Conan Doyle).
Raggiunto questo piccolo traguardo, linea di
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781479220588
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/2/2012
  • Pages: 218
  • Product dimensions: 6.69 (w) x 9.61 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

The life of Arthur Conan Doyle illustrates the excitement and diversity of the Victorian age unlike that of any other single figure of the period. At different points in his life he was a surgeon on a whaling ship; a GP; an apprentice eye-surgeon; an unsuccessful parliamentary candidate (twice); a multi-talented sportsman; one of the inventors of cross-country skiing in Switzerland; a formidable public speaker; a campaigner against miscarriages of justice; a military strategist; a writer in a range of forms; and the head of an extraordinary family. In his autobiography, he wrote: 'I have had a life which, for variety and romance, could, I think, hardly be exceeded.' He was not wrong. But Conan Doyle was also a Victorian with a twist, a man of tensions and contradictions. He was fascinated by travel, exploration, and invention, indeed all things modern and technological; yet at the same time he was also very traditional, voicing support for values such as chivalry, duty, constancy, and honour. By the time of his death in July 1930 he was a celebrity, achieving worldwide fame and notoriety for his creation of the rationalist, scientific super-detective Sherlock Holmes; yet at the same time his later decades were taken up with his advocacy of the new religion of Spiritualism, in which he was a devoted believer.

Biography

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After nine years in Jesuit schools, he went to Edinburgh University, receiving a degree in medicine in 1881. He then became an eye specialist in Southsea, with a distressing lack of success. Hoping to augment his income, he wrote his first story, A Study in Scarlet. His detective, Sherlock Holmes, was modeled in part after Dr. Joseph Bell of the Edinburgh Infirmary, a man with spectacular powers of observation, analysis, and inference. Conan Doyle may have been influenced also by his admiration for the neat plots of Gaboriau and for Poe's detective, M. Dupin. After several rejections, the story was sold to a British publisher for £25, and thus was born the world's best-known and most-loved fictional detective. Fifty-nine more Sherlock Holmes adventures followed.

Once, wearying of Holmes, his creator killed him off, but was forced by popular demand to resurrect him. Sir Arthur -- he had been knighted for this defense of the British cause in his The Great Boer War -- became an ardent Spiritualist after the death of his son Kingsley, who had been wounded at the Somme in World War I. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in Sussex in 1930.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

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    1. Also Known As:
      Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 22, 1859
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      July 7, 1930
    2. Place of Death:
      Crowborough, Sussex, England

Read an Excerpt

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes


By Arthur Conan Doyle

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2014 MysteriousPress.com/Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4804-8972-1



CHAPTER 1

Adventure I. Silver Blaze

"I AM AFRAID, WATSON, that I shall have to go," said Holmes, as we sat down together to our breakfast one morning.

"Go! Where to?"

"To Dartmoor; to King's Pyland."

I was not surprised. Indeed, my only wonder was that he had not already been mixed up in this extraordinary case, which was the one topic of conversation through the length and breadth of England. For a whole day my companion had rambled about the room with his chin upon his chest and his brows knitted, charging and recharging his pipe with the strongest black tobacco, and absolutely deaf to any of my questions or remarks. Fresh editions of every paper had been sent up by our news agent, only to be glanced over and tossed down into a corner. Yet, silent as he was, I knew perfectly well what it was over which he was brooding. There was but one problem before the public which could challenge his powers of analysis, and that was the singular disappearance of the favorite for the Wessex Cup, and the tragic murder of its trainer. When, therefore, he suddenly announced his intention of setting out for the scene of the drama it was only what I had both expected and hoped for.

"I should be most happy to go down with you if I should not be in the way," said I.

"My dear Watson, you would confer a great favor upon me by coming. And I think that your time will not be misspent, for there are points about the case which promise to make it an absolutely unique one. We have, I think, just time to catch our train at Paddington, and I will go further into the matter upon our journey. You would oblige me by bringing with you your very excellent field-glass."

And so it happened that an hour or so later I found myself in the corner of a first-class carriage flying along en route for Exeter, while Sherlock Holmes, with his sharp, eager face framed in his ear-flapped travelling-cap, dipped rapidly into the bundle of fresh papers which he had procured at Paddington. We had left Reading far behind us before he thrust the last one of them under the seat, and offered me his cigar-case.

"We are going well," said he, looking out the window and glancing at his watch. "Our rate at present is fifty-three and a half miles an hour."

"I have not observed the quarter-mile posts," said I.

"Nor have I. But the telegraph posts upon this line are sixty yards apart, and the calculation is a simple one. I presume that you have looked into this matter of the murder of John Straker and the disappearance of Silver Blaze?"

"I have seen what the Telegraph and the Chronicle have to say."

"It is one of those cases where the art of the reasoner should be used rather for the sifting of details than for the acquiring of fresh evidence. The tragedy has been so uncommon, so complete and of such personal importance to so many people, that we are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture, and hypothesis. The difficulty is to detach the framework of fact—of absolute undeniable fact—from the embellishments of theorists and reporters. Then, having established ourselves upon this sound basis, it is our duty to see what inferences may be drawn and what are the special points upon which the whole mystery turns. On Tuesday evening I received telegrams from both Colonel Ross, the owner of the horse, and from Inspector Gregory, who is looking after the case, inviting my cooperation."

"Tuesday evening!" I exclaimed. "And this is Thursday morning. Why didn't you go down yesterday?"

"Because I made a blunder, my dear Watson—which is, I am afraid, a more common occurrence than any one would think who only knew me through your memoirs. The fact is that I could not believe it possible that the most remarkable horse in England could long remain concealed, especially in so sparsely inhabited a place as the north of Dartmoor. From hour to hour yesterday I expected to hear that he had been found, and that his abductor was the murderer of John Straker. When, however, another morning had come, and I found that beyond the arrest of young Fitzroy Simpson nothing had been done, I felt that it was time for me to take action. Yet in some ways I feel that yesterday has not been wasted."

"You have formed a theory, then?"

"At least I have got a grip of the essential facts of the case. I shall enumerate them to you, for nothing clears up a case so much as stating it to another person, and I can hardly expect your co-operation if I do not show you the position from which we start."

I lay back against the cushions, puffing at my cigar, while Holmes, leaning forward, with his long, thin forefinger checking off the points upon the palm of his left hand, gave me a sketch of the events which had led to our journey.

"Silver Blaze," said he, "is from the Somomy stock, and holds as brilliant a record as his famous ancestor. He is now in his fifth year, and has brought in turn each of the prizes of the turf to Colonel Ross, his fortunate owner. Up to the time of the catastrophe he was the first favorite for the Wessex Cup, the betting being three to one on him. He has always, however, been a prime favorite with the racing public, and has never yet disappointed them, so that even at those odds enormous sums of money have been laid upon him. It is obvious, therefore, that there were many people who had the strongest interest in preventing Silver Blaze from being there at the fall of the flag next Tuesday.

"The fact was, of course, appreciated at King's Pyland, where the Colonel's training-stable is situated. Every precaution was taken to guard the favorite. The trainer, John Straker, is a retired jockey who rode in Colonel Ross's colors before he became too heavy for the weighing-chair. He has served the Colonel for five years as jockey and for seven as trainer, and has always shown himself to be a zealous and honest servant. Under him were three lads; for the establishment was a small one, containing only four horses in all. One of these lads sat up each night in the stable, while the others slept in the loft. All three bore excellent characters. John Straker, who is a married man, lived in a small villa about two hundred yards from the stables. He has no children, keeps one maid-servant, and is comfortably off. The country round is very lonely, but about half a mile to the north there is a small cluster of villas which have been built by a Tavistock contractor for the use of invalids and others who may wish to enjoy the pure Dartmoor air. Tavistock itself lies two miles to the west, while across the moor, also about two miles distant, is the larger training establishment of Mapleton, which belongs to Lord Backwater, and is managed by Silas Brown. In every other direction the moor is a complete wilderness, inhabited only by a few roaming gypsies. Such was the general situation last Monday night when the catastrophe occurred.

"On that evening the horses had been exercised and watered as usual, and the stables were locked up at nine o'clock. Two of the lads walked up to the trainer's house, where they had supper in the kitchen, while the third, Ned Hunter, remained on guard. At a few minutes after nine the maid, Edith Baxter, carried down to the stables his supper, which consisted of a dish of curried mutton. She took no liquid, as there was a water-tap in the stables, and it was the rule that the lad on duty should drink nothing else. The maid carried a lantern with her, as it was very dark and the path ran across the open moor.

"Edith Baxter was within thirty yards of the stables, when a man appeared out of the darkness and called to her to stop. As he stepped into the circle of yellow light thrown by the lantern she saw that he was a person of gentlemanly bearing, dressed in a gray suit of tweeds, with a cloth cap. He wore gaiters, and carried a heavy stick with a knob to it. She was most impressed, however, by the extreme pallor of his face and by the nervousness of his manner. His age, she thought, would be rather over thirty than under it.

"'Can you tell me where I am?' he asked. 'I had almost made up my mind to sleep on the moor, when I saw the light of your lantern.'

"'You are close to the King's Pyland training-stables,' said she.

"'Oh, indeed! What a stroke of luck!' he cried. 'I understand that a stable-boy sleeps there alone every night. Perhaps that is his supper which you are carrying to him. Now I am sure that you would not be too proud to earn the price of a new dress, would you?' He took a piece of white paper folded up out of his waistcoat pocket. 'See that the boy has this to-night, and you shall have the prettiest frock that money can buy.'

"She was frightened by the earnestness of his manner, and ran past him to the window through which she was accustomed to hand the meals. It was already opened, and Hunter was seated at the small table inside. She had begun to tell him of what had happened, when the stranger came up again.

"'Good-evening,' said he, looking through the window. 'I wanted to have a word with you.' The girl has sworn that as he spoke she noticed the corner of the little paper packet protruding from his closed hand.

"'What business have you here?' asked the lad.

"'It's business that may put something into your pocket,' said the other. 'You've two horses in for the Wessex Cup—Silver Blaze and Bayard. Let me have the straight tip and you won't be a loser. Is it a fact that at the weights Bayard could give the other a hundred yards in five furlongs, and that the stable have put their money on him?'

"'So, you're one of those damned touts!' cried the lad. 'I'll show you how we serve them in King's Pyland.' He sprang up and rushed across the stable to unloose the dog. The girl fled away to the house, but as she ran she looked back and saw that the stranger was leaning through the window. A minute later, however, when Hunter rushed out with the hound he was gone, and though he ran all round the buildings he failed to find any trace of him."

"One moment," I asked. "Did the stable-boy, when he ran out with the dog, leave the door unlocked behind him?"

"Excellent, Watson, excellent!" murmured my companion. "The importance of the point struck me so forcibly that I sent a special wire to Dartmoor yesterday to clear the matter up. The boy locked the door before he left it. The window, I may add, was not large enough for a man to get through.

"Hunter waited until his fellow-grooms had returned, when he sent a message to the trainer and told him what had occurred. Straker was excited at hearing the account, although he does not seem to have quite realized its true significance. It left him, however, vaguely uneasy, and Mrs. Straker, waking at one in the morning, found that he was dressing. In reply to her inquiries, he said that he could not sleep on account of his anxiety about the horses, and that he intended to walk down to the stables to see that all was well. She begged him to remain at home, as she could hear the rain pattering against the window, but in spite of her entreaties he pulled on his large mackintosh and left the house.

"Mrs. Straker awoke at seven in the morning, to find that her husband had not yet returned. She dressed herself hastily, called the maid, and set off for the stables. The door was open; inside, huddled together upon a chair, Hunter was sunk in a state of absolute stupor, the favorite's stall was empty, and there were no signs of his trainer.

"The two lads who slept in the chaff-cutting loft above the harness-room were quickly aroused. They had heard nothing during the night, for they are both sound sleepers. Hunter was obviously under the influence of some powerful drug, and as no sense could be got out of him, he was left to sleep it off while the two lads and the two women ran out in search of the absentees. They still had hopes that the trainer had for some reason taken out the horse for early exercise, but on ascending the knoll near the house, from which all the neighboring moors were visible, they not only could see no signs of the missing favorite, but they perceived something which warned them that they were in the presence of a tragedy.

"About a quarter of a mile from the stables John Straker's overcoat was flapping from a furze-bush. Immediately beyond there was a bowl-shaped depression in the moor, and at the bottom of this was found the dead body of the unfortunate trainer. His head had been shattered by a savage blow from some heavy weapon, and he was wounded on the thigh, where there was a long, clean cut, inflicted evidently by some very sharp instrument. It was clear, however, that Straker had defended himself vigorously against his assailants, for in his right hand he held a small knife, which was clotted with blood up to the handle, while in his left he clasped a red and black silk cravat, which was recognized by the maid as having been worn on the preceding evening by the stranger who had visited the stables. Hunter, on recovering from his stupor, was also quite positive as to the ownership of the cravat. He was equally certain that the same stranger had, while standing at the window, drugged his curried mutton, and so deprived the stables of their watchman. As to the missing horse, there were abundant proofs in the mud which lay at the bottom of the fatal hollow that he had been there at the time of the struggle. But from that morning he has disappeared, and although a large reward has been offered, and all the gypsies of Dartmoor are on the alert, no news has come of him. Finally, an analysis has shown that the remains of his supper left by the stable-lad contain an appreciable quantity of powdered opium, while the people at the house partook of the same dish on the same night without any ill effect.

"Those are the main facts of the case, stripped of all surmise, and stated as baldly as possible. I shall now recapitulate what the police have done in the matter.

"Inspector Gregory, to whom the case has been committed, is an extremely competent officer. Were he but gifted with imagination he might rise to great heights in his profession. On his arrival he promptly found and arrested the man upon whom suspicion naturally rested. There was little difficulty in finding him, for he inhabited one of those villas which I have mentioned. His name, it appears, was Fitzroy Simpson. He was a man of excellent birth and education, who had squandered a fortune upon the turf, and who lived now by doing a little quiet and genteel book-making in the sporting clubs of London. An examination of his betting-book shows that bets to the amount of five thousand pounds had been registered by him against the favorite. On being arrested he volunteered the statement that he had come down to Dartmoor in the hope of getting some information about the King's Pyland horses, and also about Desborough, the second favorite, which was in charge of Silas Brown at the Mapleton stables. He did not attempt to deny that he had acted as described upon the evening before, but declared that he had no sinister designs, and had simply wished to obtain first-hand information. When confronted with his cravat, he turned very pale, and was utterly unable to account for its presence in the hand of the murdered man. His wet clothing showed that he had been out in the storm of the night before, and his stick, which was a Penang-lawyer weighted with lead, was just such a weapon as might, by repeated blows, have inflicted the terrible injuries to which the trainer had succumbed. On the other hand, there was no wound upon his person, while the state of Straker's knife would show that one at least of his assailants must bear his mark upon him. There you have it all in a nutshell, Watson, and if you can give me any light I shall be infinitely obliged to you."

I had listened with the greatest interest to the statement which Holmes, with characteristic clearness, had laid before me. Though most of the facts were familiar to me, I had not sufficiently appreciated their relative importance, nor their connection to each other.

"Is it not possible," I suggested, "that the incised wound upon Straker may have been caused by his own knife in the convulsive struggles which follow any brain injury?"

"It is more than possible; it is probable," said Holmes. "In that case one of the main points in favor of the accused disappears."

"And yet," said I, "even now I fail to understand what the theory of the police can be."

"I am afraid that whatever theory we state has very grave objections to it," returned my companion. "The police imagine, I take it, that this Fitzroy Simpson, having drugged the lad, and having in some way obtained a duplicate key, opened the stable door and took out the horse, with the intention, apparently, of kidnapping him altogether. His bridle is missing, so that Simpson must have put this on. Then, having left the door open behind him, he was leading the horse away over the moor, when he was either met or overtaken by the trainer. A row naturally ensued. Simpson beat out the trainer's brains with his heavy stick without receiving any injury from the small knife which Straker used in self-defense, and then the thief either led the horse on to some secret hiding-place, or else it may have bolted during the struggle, and be now wandering out on the moors. That is the case as it appears to the police, and improbable as it is, all other explanations are more improbable still. However, I shall very quickly test the matter when I am once upon the spot, and until then I cannot really see how we can get much further than our present position."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. Copyright © 2014 MysteriousPress.com/Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
General Editor's Preface to the Series
Introduction
Note on the Text
Select Bibliography
A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle
Silver Blaze 3
The Cardboard Box 30
The Yellow Face 53
The Stockbroker's Clerk 73
The 'Gloria Scott' 92
The Musgrave Ritual 113
The Reigate Squire 134
The Crooked Man 155
The Resident Patient 174
The Greek Interpreter 193
The Naval Treaty 213
The Final Problem 249
App. I. The Adventure of the Two Collaborators 269
App. II. How I Write My Books 272
Explanatory Notes 274
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 66 )
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(37)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 66 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2006

    The master at work

    The second collection of Sherlock Holmes short stories is just as good as the first, though most of the stories here are shorter than in the previous book. That just means that this book can be enjoyed even by people who have short attention spans or a lack of time to read longer stories. The important element of this book, of course, is the final story, which introduces the reader to Sherlock Holmes' arch enemy, Professor Moriarty. It must have been rather odd for the English reader at the time to have Sherlock Holmes' final adventure be against a man whom they had never heard of before, and for it to happen in such a way that you can't say for sure exactly what happened is both maddening and very creative. Of course, more stories followed (I'm not even halfway through my collection at this point), but from here on out the reader knows how it all ends.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Brilliant

    This is a great collection of great Sherlock Holmes stories.It has well selected stories that are both popular and gripping. I would definitley reccomend this to any Sherlock Holmes fan or just a fan of mystery novels.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    HUGE FAN

    Sherlock Holmes, the world's best-known and most-loved fictional detective, is more popular today than ever. This collection presents many of the most familiar cases Holmes and his assistant, Dr. Watson, ever solve, including "Silver Blaze," "The Greek Interpreter," and "The Musgrave Ritual." As Holmes's fame grows, it brings him notoriety that piques the ire of London's criminal underworld, who begin to scheme against him. It is in "The Final Problem" that Dr. Watson relates the grisly, fatal, and shocking tale of how Holmes finally meets his match, encountering the diabolical Professor Moriarty in a terrible struggle at Reichenbach Falls.



    I have to start out by telling you that when I was asked to review this book, it took me only seconds to respond. My husband and I are huge Sherlock Holmes fans.
    Exhibit #1 Our Cats Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson and Professor Moriarty.


    Back in the days when there were just 4 television selections, ABC, CBS, NBC and PBS, chances were pretty good that late nights on Fridays or Saturdays there would be a Sherlock Holmes movie on at least one of the channels. My favorite Holmes was Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce was my favorite Dr. Watson. But today with the Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes movie starring Robert Downey, Jr. and its sequel coming out in December there is a whole new audience for the Arthur Conan Doyle character. If you are a fan of the television show House you would also notice many similarities between Sherlock Holmes and Gregory House. In fact many episodes contain actual Holmes references. For example in the season two finale, House is shot by a crazed gunman credited as "Moriarty," the name of Holmes's nemesis. Today I just found this article that says CBS is working on a modern day Sherlock Holmes story. BBC already has out their own contemporary series. There are even cartoons based on the characters and books written about Holmes for all grade levels.

    I guess what I am trying to say are these stories are timeless and can be read again and again at any time in your life.

    Be sure to go see the new movie in December. I am not sure I like explosions and shooting but that's what is in all suspense movies these days.



    I am more a fan of the Holmes in this book who uses his deductive skills, perceptions and sharp observations to solve the cases. This is a fantastic book for the older fans like me and a great way to introduce new fans on how Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson started out. The first story was published in 1887 and the character of Sherlock Holmes is still relevant today. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has truly created characters that are timeless and who I "deduce" will be with us in one form or another forever and ever.


    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Penguin Books. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. Receiving a complimentary copy in no way reflected my review of this book. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2010

    suspenceful

    all the time i was at the edge of my chair. the story always seemed to change

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 18, 2011

    awful

    it wouldn't let me give zero starts...this is a digital scan which means every so-many lines you see text inserted that tells you who digitized. NOT WORTH "FREE".

    I have better versions of this for free for the kindle app on my phone.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 1999

    I loved it!!!

    I loved the coloured way he illustrated the Master Detective himself!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Book

    Fun, and an exciting read! Get it and try it out. It is free, after all. And who doesnt like a mystery? And what mystery is better than Sherlock Holmes?!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    Awesome

    This orc version was very good - this will be a keeper on my nook as i adore holmes :))))))))))

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    To october 2nd

    Please dont write a review that long. No one wants to read a review that long.

    2 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 1, 2011

    Good read

    Enjoyable The ocr introduced some fun and provided a few puzzles to figure out - a Holmes like experience!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2000

    outstanding

    i loved it

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    Sherlock

    This is what I was lookljting for!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2012

    Couldn't put it down!

    Wonderfil book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Review

    Just as stylish as Arthur Conan Doyle's Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2011

    Ok

    It is not really a good book

    1 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 17, 2014

    Highly Recommended.

    This is a great book for Holmes buffs.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2014

    Acacia Holmes

    Anderson I hate to inform you but I have lost my jar of jam and i am in great distress!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2014

    Andersn The Unicorn

    Lol thanks! You have a cool one too!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2014

    <3

    I love sherlock holmes

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2014

    Raylen

    Bad! Bad! Don't give it four stars it's bad!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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