Memphis Under the Ptolemies: (Second Edition)

Overview

Drawing on archaeological findings and an unusual combination of Greek and Egyptian evidence, Dorothy Thompson examines the economic life and multicultural society of the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis in the era between Alexander and Augustus. Now thoroughly revised and updated, this masterful account is essential reading for anyone interested in ancient Egypt or the Hellenistic world.

The relationship of the native population with the Greek-speaking immigrants is illustrated...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $24.88   
  • New (7) from $24.88   
  • Used (1) from $34.12   
Sending request ...

Overview

Drawing on archaeological findings and an unusual combination of Greek and Egyptian evidence, Dorothy Thompson examines the economic life and multicultural society of the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis in the era between Alexander and Augustus. Now thoroughly revised and updated, this masterful account is essential reading for anyone interested in ancient Egypt or the Hellenistic world.

The relationship of the native population with the Greek-speaking immigrants is illustrated in Thompson's analysis of the position of Memphite priests within the Ptolemaic state. Egyptians continued to control mummification and the cult of the dead; the undertakers of the Memphite necropolis were barely touched by things Greek. The cult of the living Apis bull also remained primarily Egyptian; yet on death the bull, deified as Osorapis, became Sarapis for the Greeks. Within this god's sacred enclosure, the Sarapieion, is found a strange amalgam of Greek and Egyptian cultures.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The Atlantic
This thoroughly revised edition of a masterpiece of historical writing examines with precision and verve the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis in the period between Alexander and Augustus. . . . She is especially sensitive to the syncretic, sometimes cacophonous, metropolitan life produced by a population drawn from throughout the Mediterranean basin, and by the confrontation of classical civilization itself on the verge of cultural upheaval, as Roman power gradually eclipsed Greek prestige and influence—with a civilization that reached back millennia. The result is a meticulous, vivid portrait of a profoundly foreign world.
American Journal of Philology
[A] masterful analysis of the surviving evidence for ancient Memphis.
— John F. Oates
History
[T]his book greatly enhances understanding of Egyptian history in the Ptolemaic period and the author is to be congratulated on her skill in welding the disparate sources into such an attractive whole.
— Amélie Kuhrt
Choice
[A] book of utmost importance to all readers interested in ancient civilizations. . . . Thompson's concentration on the Hellenistic period provides a penetrating study of all aspects of this city from the time of Alexander to Augustus.
— C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky
Egyptological.com
This, in so many ways, is a book aimed at students and for that target audience is successful, and would make a sensible purchase.
— Kate Phizackerley
European Legacy
Scott Soames' new book, What Is Meaning?, is an important book, both in the issues it raises and in its shortcomings. It is the first serious discussion of meaning (not 'semantic content' or some other term designed to sidestep the real issue) by a leading analytic philosopher of language in a long while, and its findings lead to a more realistic understanding of meaning and language.
— Sergeiy Sandler
Ancient Egypt
The text of the book is closely packed and authoritative in its presentation of the facts. Whilst this is not an 'easy read' the text is surprisingly readable and engaging. Indeed there is so much to be learned from these pages that one wants to turn the page and read on, and once a chapter is started it is difficult to put the book down. . . . In short a masterful piece of scholarship looking at a complex and often overlooked period of Egyptian history. A book that any serious student of the Ptolemaic Period, or the Hellenistic world, would greatly benefit from reading.
— Victor Blunden
American Journal of Philology - John F. Oates
[A] masterful analysis of the surviving evidence for ancient Memphis.
History - Amelie Kuhrt
[T]his book greatly enhances understanding of Egyptian history in the Ptolemaic period and the author is to be congratulated on her skill in welding the disparate sources into such an attractive whole.
Choice - C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky
[A] book of utmost importance to all readers interested in ancient civilizations. . . . Thompson's concentration on the Hellenistic period provides a penetrating study of all aspects of this city from the time of Alexander to Augustus.
Egyptological.com - Kate Phizackerley
This, in so many ways, is a book aimed at students and for that target audience is successful, and would make a sensible purchase.
European Legacy - Sergeiy Sandler
Scott Soames' new book, What Is Meaning?, is an important book, both in the issues it raises and in its shortcomings. It is the first serious discussion of meaning (not 'semantic content' or some other term designed to sidestep the real issue) by a leading analytic philosopher of language in a long while, and its findings lead to a more realistic understanding of meaning and language.
Ancient Egypt - Victor Blunden
The text of the book is closely packed and authoritative in its presentation of the facts. Whilst this is not an 'easy read' the text is surprisingly readable and engaging. Indeed there is so much to be learned from these pages that one wants to turn the page and read on, and once a chapter is started it is difficult to put the book down. . . . In short a masterful piece of scholarship looking at a complex and often overlooked period of Egyptian history. A book that any serious student of the Ptolemaic Period, or the Hellenistic world, would greatly benefit from reading.
History - Amélie Kuhrt
[T]his book greatly enhances understanding of Egyptian history in the Ptolemaic period and the author is to be congratulated on her skill in welding the disparate sources into such an attractive whole.
Choice - C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky
[A] book of utmost importance to all readers interested in ancient civilizations. . . . Thompson's concentration on the Hellenistic period provides a penetrating study of all aspects of this city from the time of Alexander to Augustus.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 1989 James H. Breasted Prize, American Historical Association

"This thoroughly revised edition of a masterpiece of historical writing examines with precision and verve the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis in the period between Alexander and Augustus. . . . She is especially sensitive to the syncretic, sometimes cacophonous, metropolitan life produced by a population drawn from throughout the Mediterranean basin, and by the confrontation of classical civilization itself on the verge of cultural upheaval, as Roman power gradually eclipsed Greek prestige and influence—with a civilization that reached back millennia. The result is a meticulous, vivid portrait of a profoundly foreign world."—The Atlantic

"[A] masterful analysis of the surviving evidence for ancient Memphis."—John F. Oates, American Journal of Philology

"[T]his book greatly enhances understanding of Egyptian history in the Ptolemaic period and the author is to be congratulated on her skill in welding the disparate sources into such an attractive whole."—Amélie Kuhrt, History

"[A] book of utmost importance to all readers interested in ancient civilizations. . . . Thompson's concentration on the Hellenistic period provides a penetrating study of all aspects of this city from the time of Alexander to Augustus."—C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky, Choice

"This, in so many ways, is a book aimed at students and for that target audience is successful, and would make a sensible purchase."—Kate Phizackerley, Egyptological.com

"Scott Soames' new book, What Is Meaning?, is an important book, both in the issues it raises and in its shortcomings. It is the first serious discussion of meaning (not 'semantic content' or some other term designed to sidestep the real issue) by a leading analytic philosopher of language in a long while, and its findings lead to a more realistic understanding of meaning and language."—Sergeiy Sandler, European Legacy

"The text of the book is closely packed and authoritative in its presentation of the facts. Whilst this is not an 'easy read' the text is surprisingly readable and engaging. Indeed there is so much to be learned from these pages that one wants to turn the page and read on, and once a chapter is started it is difficult to put the book down. . . . In short a masterful piece of scholarship looking at a complex and often overlooked period of Egyptian history. A book that any serious student of the Ptolemaic Period, or the Hellenistic world, would greatly benefit from reading."—Victor Blunden, Ancient Egypt

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691140339
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 2/26/2012
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 360
  • Sales rank: 556,086
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Dorothy J. Thompson is a fellow of Girton College, University of Cambridge, and a member of the faculty of classics at the University of Cambridge. She is a fellow of the British Academy and an honorary president of the International Association of Papyrologists.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations and Tables viii
Prefaces ix
Acknowledgments xv
Abbreviations xvi
A Note on Transliteration xix
Chapter 1: The Second City 1
Chapter 2: Economic Life in Memphis 29
Chapter 3: Ethnic Minorities 76
Chapter 4: Ptolemies and Temples 99
Chapter 5: The Undertakers 144
Chapter 6: Apis and Other Cults 177
Chapter 7: Between Two Worlds: The Sarapieion 197
Chapter 8: Roman Memphis: An Epilogue 247
Appendixes
A. Memphite Professions Additional to Those Recorded in the Zenon Archive 259
B. The Undertakers’ Archive 260
C. A Property Settlement in 197 B.C. 262
D. Apis Bulls of the Ptolemaic Period 263
Bibliography 285
Index 319

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)