Men and Dogs

( 54 )

Overview

When Hannah Legare was 11, her father went on a fishing trip in the Charleston harbor and never came back. And while most of the town and her family accepted Buzz's disappearance, Hannah remained steadfastly convinced of his imminent return.

Twenty years later Hannah's new life in San Francisco is unraveling. Her marriage is on the rocks, her business is bankrupt. After a disastrous attempt to win back her husband, she ends up back at her ...
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Overview

When Hannah Legare was 11, her father went on a fishing trip in the Charleston harbor and never came back. And while most of the town and her family accepted Buzz's disappearance, Hannah remained steadfastly convinced of his imminent return.

Twenty years later Hannah's new life in San Francisco is unraveling. Her marriage is on the rocks, her business is bankrupt. After a disastrous attempt to win back her husband, she ends up back at her mother's home to "rest up", where she is once again sucked into the mystery of her missing father. Suspecting that those closest are keeping secrets--including Palmer, her emotionally closed, well-mannered brother and Warren, the beautiful boyfriend she left behind--Hannah sets out on an uproarious, dangerous quest that will test the whole family's concepts of loyalty and faith.
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Editorial Reviews

Andrea Griffith
as in her best-selling Girls in Trucks, [Crouch] writes with a dark, twisty, but approachable Southern charm.
Library Journal
Meredith Maran
Prepare to have your heart broken while laughing out loud at this breathtaking, scathingly sardonic novel. From her opening line—"Two days before Hannah's father disappeared, he took her out in his boat—Crouch grabs you and never lets go.... Crouch renders San Franciscans in caustic living color... When Hannah goes home to Charleston to dry out and try to find her father, Crouch brings her eccentric Southern kinfolk to life with equal verve. In the hands of a less adept author, this tightly wound tale of one woman's unraveling and redemption might seem more grim than guffaw-worthy. But with Crouch in charge, the reader is assured of a reflective yet riotous ride." Four stars.
People
Marie Claire
"[an] indulgent chick-lit read"
Complete Woman
"riveting.... dive right in."
Coastal Living
"[A] hot read for a hot day.... In this arresting and often very funny tale, Crouch, best-selling author of Girls in Trucks, makes a case for the redemptive power of uncompromising loyalty and love."
Tricia Springstubb
Self-sabotaging heroines have made for amusing reading since Jane Austen, and Katie Crouch is as good at them as she is at titles.... Who can resist a local accent 'so complex it allows a woman to simultaneously seduce and reprimand in one single word'? Crouch's comic timing is a treat, as is her eye for minor details, like Palmer's damaged rescue dog, who can't bark but merely whispers 'oof.'
The Cleveland Plain Dealer
Pam Kelley
Crouch's prose is crisp and full of engaging details.
The Charlotte Observer
Tricia Springstubb - The Cleveland Plain Dealer
"Self-sabotaging heroines have made for amusing reading since Jane Austen, and Katie Crouch is as good at them as she is at titles.... Who can resist a local accent 'so complex it allows a woman to simultaneously seduce and reprimand in one single word'? Crouch's comic timing is a treat, as is her eye for minor details, like Palmer's damaged rescue dog, who can't bark but merely whispers 'oof.'"
Pam Kelley - The Charlotte Observer
"Crouch's prose is crisp and full of engaging details."
Meredith Maran - People
"Prepare to have your heart broken while laughing out loud at this breathtaking, scathingly sardonic novel. From her opening line--"Two days before Hannah's father disappeared, he took her out in his boat"--Crouch grabs you and never lets go.... Crouch renders San Franciscans in caustic living color... When Hannah goes home to Charleston to dry out and try to find her father, Crouch brings her eccentric Southern kinfolk to life with equal verve. In the hands of a less adept author, this tightly wound tale of one woman's unraveling and redemption might seem more grim than guffaw-worthy. But with Crouch in charge, the reader is assured of a reflective yet riotous ride." Four stars.
From the Publisher
"Prepare to have your heart broken while laughing out loud at this breathtaking, scathingly sardonic novel. From her opening line—"Two days before Hannah's father disappeared, he took her out in his boat"—Crouch grabs you and never lets go.... Crouch renders San Franciscans in caustic living color... When Hannah goes home to Charleston to dry out and try to find her father, Crouch brings her eccentric Southern kinfolk to life with equal verve. In the hands of a less adept author, this tightly wound tale of one woman's unraveling and redemption might seem more grim than guffaw-worthy. But with Crouch in charge, the reader is assured of a reflective yet riotous ride." Four stars.—Meredith Maran, People

"[an] indulgent chick-lit read"—Marie Claire

"riveting.... dive right in."—Complete Woman

"[A] hot read for a hot day.... In this arresting and often very funny tale, Crouch, best-selling author of Girls in Trucks, makes a case for the redemptive power of uncompromising loyalty and love."—Coastal Living

"Self-sabotaging heroines have made for amusing reading since Jane Austen, and Katie Crouch is as good at them as she is at titles.... Who can resist a local accent 'so complex it allows a woman to simultaneously seduce and reprimand in one single word'? Crouch's comic timing is a treat, as is her eye for minor details, like Palmer's damaged rescue dog, who can't bark but merely whispers 'oof.'"—Tricia Springstubb, The Cleveland Plain Dealer

"Crouch's prose is crisp and full of engaging details."—Pam Kelley, The Charlotte Observer

"as in her best-selling Girls in Trucks, [Crouch] writes with a dark, twisty, but approachable Southern charm."—Andrea Griffith, Library Journal

Publishers Weekly
Crouch's accomplished sophomore novel kicks off with a flashback: 20-odd years ago, Buzz Legare vanished while on a fishing trip. The fallout of his disappearance and presumed death appears in his 30-something children: Hannah drinks too much, her business is failing, and her husband has kicked her out after her repeated adultery. Hannah's gay brother, Palmer, refuses to let anyone get too close—he's ready to end his yearlong relationship when his partner brings up the idea of adopting a baby. After Hannah injures herself trying to break into her husband's apartment, she heads home to Charleston, S.C., to get her life back on track, but instead finds herself pursuing the past. Damaged and vulnerable, she zigzags through her past—an old boyfriend, questions about her parents' fidelity, and finally facing down where her unwillingness to accept love has gotten her. There's nothing unique about the premise—woman in crisis goes home and discovers herself by exhuming the past—but Crouch (Girls in Trucks) handles it deftly; her dialogue is snappy, the situations darkly funny, Hannah and Palmer are unlikable but sympathetic, and there's just enough mystery to keep the pages turning. (Apr.)
Library Journal
When Hannah Legare was a young girl, her father disappeared on a routine fishing trip. Years later, Hannah finally confronts her past when she is forced to recuperate at home in Charleston, SC, after a drunken accident in San Francisco. This is not Hannah's best moment. Her marriage is failing, owing to her serial adultery; her sex-toy business is tanking; she drinks too much; and she holds her mother, stepfather, and brother Palmer at a distinct distance. By digging into the past—her father's disappearance, the state of her parents' marriage, and unfinished business with her high school boyfriend—Hannah doesn't really discover the answers but learns just enough about love and herself that she can face her present reality. VERDICT Hannah is not exactly a likable character, but she reflects enough humor in her brokenness to be memorable. Crouch's second novel sounds formulaic, but as in her best-selling Girls in Trucks, she writes with a dark, twisty, but approachable Southern charm. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 1/10.]—Andrea Griffith, New York
Kirkus Reviews
The collapse of her marriage, not to mention a three-story fall, sends a woman back home to Charleston, S.C., to investigate her father's disappearance, in Crouch's sardonic second (Girls in Trucks, 2008). Hannah, 35, and her now-estranged husband Jon are sudden San Francisco millionaires-their online sex-toy business has taken off. Her drinking and infidelity have driven Jon away. Hannah suffered her most intractable emotional wound 24 years before, the day her father Buzz, a successful doctor, motored out alone into Charleston harbor, accompanied only by the family dog, Tucker. He never showed up for his son Palmer's soccer game that afternoon. His boat was found, containing only Tucker. Buzz's body was never recovered. His beautiful wife, Daisy, moved on and married DeWitt, Charleston's wealthiest man. Hannah has always compared her looks-she resembles her father, whose features look too big on her-unfavorably to her mother's. After drunkenly scaling Jon's apartment building to prove her love, and losing her footing thanks to a yapping terrier, she wakes up in the hospital. Jon and Daisy give her a choice: recuperation in Charleston, or rehab. Rooting among old photos in DeWitt's mansion, she discovers some unsettling clues. One snapshot shows Daisy and Buzz at a party with a group of stoned, hippie-like friends. Hovering in the background is DeWitt. But Daisy claimed not to have met DeWitt until after Buzz vanished. Palmer, a veterinarian, is quarreling with his boyfriend Tom over whether they want a child-as if gay life in Charleston wasn't challenging enough. In his mind, Palmer obsessively revisits his father's last day-was Buzz driven to suicide after accidentally spotting Palmerin flagrante with another boy? Only Hannah still thinks Buzz may be alive. But if he is, why did he abandon her? Although it's believable, one senses Hannah's quest for Buzz is merely a pretext-self-knowledge and redefinition of family are the real goals here. Sunny outlook with enough clouds to keep it interesting.
Irina Reyn
"Katie Crouch's novel-about hope, healing, and coming home Southern-style-is not only moving and suspenseful and wise, but hilarious! Suffused with sassy intelligence and warmth, Men and Dogs gripped me from the first page and wouldn't let go."
Michelle Richmond
"In Men and Dogs, Katie Crouch serves up a heartfelt reminder to Southerners-gone-astray why we love the South, why we left it, and why we inevitably return. Smart, stubborn, and hell-bent on self-destruction, Hannah is the kind of heroine you want to be friends with in your other, messier, more interesting life. Best experienced on a porch swing (mimosas optional), this novel is a winner."
Carmela Ciuraru - San Francisco Chronicle
"wonderful .... Despite her quick wit and caustic humor, Hannah is a haunted figure—she's never come to terms with the loss of her father, who disappeared without a trace on a fishing trip, presumed to have drowned, when she was 11 years old.... Crouch is too smart a writer to craft a damaged-woman-goes-home-again-and-finds-healing-and-redemption story. She knows that real life all too often disappoints.... Men and Dogs is an absorbing mystery.... Yet it's a compelling family drama, too, with enough dark humor tossed in at unexpected moments, thus avoiding melodrama. Crouch blends these elements seamlessly—and rather than deliver an eye-rolling happy ending, she gives us exactly the ending we hope for."
Carmela Ciuraru
wonderful .... Despite her quick wit and caustic humor, Hannah is a haunted figure—she's never come to terms with the loss of her father, who disappeared without a trace on a fishing trip, presumed to have drowned, when she was 11 years old.... Crouch is too smart a writer to craft a damaged-woman-goes-home-again-and-finds-healing-and-redemption story. She knows that real life all too often disappoints.... Men and Dogs is an absorbing mystery.... Yet it's a compelling family drama, too, with enough dark humor tossed in at unexpected moments, thus avoiding melodrama. Crouch blends these elements seamlessly—and rather than deliver an eye-rolling happy ending, she gives us exactly the ending we hope for.
San Francisco Chronicle
Lucinda Rosenfeld
"Katie Crouch is at her stealthy best in this tale of unresolved memories and early mid-life crisis. Men and Dogs sucks you in and won't let go."
Adriana Trigiani
"Katie Crouch is an American original. Men and Dogs is an opus of the struggle between a daughter and her father and the wounds and jubilation carried from that relationship into marriage and adulthood. It is, in turns, poignant, revealing, hilarious and sad. This is a great pick for book clubs everywhere! Katie's novel will not only inspire a lively discussion, it will ignite one!"
Marisa de los Santos
"Katie Crouch's great gifts-a wry, unflinching intelligence and the ability to create flawed, complicated characters-drive this story of a woman who must reckon with her past in order to move into her future. Hannah is exasperating, magnetic, and breathtakingly real."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316002141
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 4/7/2011
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 462,164
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Katie Crouch

Katie Crouch is the author of the bestselling novel Girls in Trucks. Her writing has also appeared in Tin House, Glamour, and McSweeney's. She lives in San Francisco, a city filled with men and dogs, one or two of which reside with her from time to time.

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First Chapter

Men and Dogs

A Novel
By Crouch, Katie

Little, Brown and Company

Copyright © 2010 Crouch, Katie
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780316002134

1

Saturday

TWO DAYS BEFORE Hannah’s father disappeared, he took her out in his boat.

It was an aluminum boat, flat and small with a pull-operated motor. Before they left, her father checked the gas and oil levels. Hannah held Tucker, the dog, on a leash.

Hannah was still small then. Eleven years old. Her hair was streaked with green from afternoons spent in the neighbor’s pool.

She wasn’t pretty. She had her father’s powerful features, and they were too large for her face. She wore a long T-shirt and red sneakers. Her bathing suit snaked up in bright lines around her neck. She wasn’t unhappy. She’s always been good at waiting.

There was no plan for the day. There never was.

The Legares were a family who navigated by the outlines of Buzz’s whims. The children had become excellent at collecting information. It was a survival tactic. They eavesdropped, they spied. Hannah’s brother taught her how to open and reseal mail over a pot of steaming water.

That morning there had been a fight. Hannah listened to the dull murmurings of it through the bedroom wall, the voices spiking in volume, then falling flat to silence. Shortly after, Buzz stepped out into the hall.

I’ll take Hannah, he said.

His voice through the door.

Her mother’s laugh.

Take her to China if you want to, she heard her mother say. I don’t care.

Hannah sat up. It was time to go.

Hannah, now thirty-five, remembers some details perfectly clearly, as if they happened just a moment ago. They bounce in her head, meaningless shards of color and sound. When she is ordering coffee. When she is in line to get on a plane.

Other things she knows she should recall—large events and happenings—now somehow eradicated. Sometimes she squeezes her eyes shut and scrapes her mind, trying to get to them.

She still has this list. Items she and her father took on the boat trip, written in an eleven-year-old’s cursive on Hello Kitty paper, carefully folded and stored.


1 jug of water
3 bottles of Coke
4 cans of Budweiser
2 bologna sandwiches
1 net
1 package chicken necks
1 portable radio
1 fishing pole
2 hats
1 bottle of sunscreen, SPF 15
1 dog

When they were ready, Hannah untied the bowline and waited on the dock while her father pulled the cord. The engine sneezed, rumbled slightly, and died.

Damn it, Buzz said.

He looked up at his daughter and smiled.

Don’t tell your mother.

She nodded. There were going to be many things she wouldn’t tell her mother.

The boat started. Buzz steered them away from the Boat Club and turned the engine knob all the way to the right. Hannah stared at the shrinking land.

Always nice to leave, isn’t it? her father said. Where should we go? China?

I don’t know.

China.

No!

We’ll send them a postcard.

No!

You’re right, no postcard.

Hannah…

Yeah?

How many bones are in the body?

Two hundred six.

Hannah’s father was a doctor, and she planned on being one, too.

How many cells?

One hundred trillion.

One hundred trillion, her father repeated, looking out at the water. He took a swallow of beer.

He was tall and, at forty-one, still lean from runs around the Battery. People remembered him as the high school track star. Buzz Legare wasn’t staggeringly handsome, but he was disarming. People wanted to be near him. Men pointedly used his first and last name in conversation. Hannah noticed that waitresses lingered after taking an order, even when her mother was there.

Aren’t you going to crab? he asked. We brought all of these chicken necks.

Hannah sighed. She didn’t want to crab. She wanted to read about Kirk Cameron.

Pretty soon a day on the boat with your dad will be the last thing you want to do, he said. Pretty soon, it’ll all be about makeup and boys.

OK. I’ll crab.

Buzz turned on the radio. He always sang. He’d start out with a hum, and then would become overwhelmed with the desire to perform. He never knew the words. He didn’t care.

Wake me up before you LA-la

Go-go, Hannah said.

What?

Go-go.

Are you sure?

I learned the words so I can lip-synch them.

Lip what?

Lip-synch.

Buzz cocked his head.

We pretend to sing them. My friends and I. Like on a show.

Who pretends? he said, casting his line.

Everyone. It’s a show.

Do me a favor, kid. Don’t pretend. Just sing.

She looked at him, mouthing, Wake me up before you

Out loud, he said.

It was midday, and men, both black and white, were sitting out in the sun, legs spread, fishing poles in their hands. They stayed on separate docks, but their children spilled into the river together, floating side by side on Styrofoam boards. Some of them waved. Hannah waved back.

Suddenly, a scream cut through the sound of the motor. Hannah jerked her head toward the shore. On one of the docks, people were running and gathering around something lying flat.

Kevin! someone shouted.

A woman was crouching, shaking a boy’s shoulder.

Kevin! Will someone—Kevin?

Hannah’s father knocked about the boat like a large caught fish, swearing as spray lurched up behind with sick, slapping sounds. They slammed into the dock.

A boy had been stung by a bee. He was in shock. His throat was swollen, and his tongue was the size of a pickle.

I’m a doctor, Buzz told the boy’s mother. He always stood up a little taller when he said this. Hannah, get my doctor’s bag. Center console, in the flare box.

Hannah ran back to the boat, found the flare box, and retrieved the bag, a perfect leather triangle that opened and closed with a reassuring snap. Inside, set rows of neatly arranged syringes, bottles, and rubber tubes. One of her favorite things to do was to put her hand inside. It was always cool, as if it required its own separate air.

Later, Hannah looked up what would have happened if her father hadn’t stopped to help that day. The bee venom was almost as lethal as cyanide for the boy. When the tip of the stinger pierced his skin, an army of histamines split from the heparins and flooded his body. Water was released from the cells, causing his skin to strain against the liquid. He would have turned blue and choked on his own tongue while his mother watched.

Afterward, a party. The boy’s father brought out another cooler of beer, and the neighbors came, carrying plastic folding chairs and bags of potato chips and a great bowl of pink, curling shrimp. Candy-lipped mothers rushed back and forth with more food. The afternoon poured away.

We have to go, Buzz said after a while. Thank you for the good time.

So we’ll come see you, Doc, the boy’s mother said. She was leaning into him slightly. You’re our doctor now.

Buzz looked down at her and squeezed her shoulder. There was a pause, then he broke away and began running. Hannah and the others watched, openmouthed, as he did a cannonball off the dock.

He’s swimming! the boy screamed. The doctor is swimming!

He ran after Hannah’s father and flung himself in the water. Now people all over the dock were following Buzz. They jumped in with huge splashes, showing off awkward half dives in their shirts and shorts.

Come on, Hannah! her father yelled. He spouted water through his lips.

No, that’s OK, she said. She was worried about her hair. She’d sprayed it up, a proud open lily.

Hannah! Swim!

She shook her head. The boy’s mother was swimming near her father. She gave him a little splash.

Hannah, he called. How many times a day does a human breathe?

Twenty thousand.

How many heartbeats?

A hundred thousand.

Come on, sweetie.

No.

Scared?

No.

Come on, honey.

Why?

Because.

Why?

There won’t always be a why.

They were all waiting. Her father, the not-dead boy, his mother, the strangers. It was April 6, a day she would come to circle in red each year and label: dad. 1985. What was happening? Hannah Legare can tell you. It was the year of New Coke. The number one song was “One More Night.” Christa McAuliffe was slated to ride the Challenger. Ronald Reagan was sworn in for a second term. As for the Legares—they were still a family. Hannah, eleven; Palmer, thirteen; Daisy, thirty-six; Buzz, forty-one.

On April 6, Hannah was a plain sixth grader with a bad perm. She was a bit scared of the water, and was shivering on a dock. She closed her eyes and listened to her heart, then held her breath to try to make it stop. It didn’t, so she jumped, because her father told her to.



Continues...

Excerpted from Men and Dogs by Crouch, Katie Copyright © 2010 by Crouch, Katie. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 54 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(16)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 54 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Family Relationship Effects

    The defining moment of Hannah's life was the disappearance of her father. Her father, a hero whose medical skills saved the life of a child in front of her. Her father, who disdained convention and made life interesting. Her father, who went out in a boat when Hannah was eleven and never returned.

    Everyone agreed that he must have drowned, but without a body, Hannah refuses to believe this is true. She grows up and becomes successful, but still checks out older men on the street of every town she goes to, hoping against hope that she will see the face of her father. She refuses to believe that any other man won't also leave her so she spends her time leaving them first, or making them leave her by her bad behavior.

    John, her husband, has just reached his limit with Hannah and her drinking and infidelity. Hannah goes home to Charleston to try to put her life back together. She spends her days talking with her brother Palmer, her mother and stepfather and her high school boyfriend. Can she solve the mystery of why her father left her behind?

    Katie Crouch has written a compelling tale of how women's lives are shaped by their experiences with their fathers. Hannah cannot heal and have a successful relationship until she puts her first relationship into focus. Women readers will see themselves in Hannah's longing for her father, and men will discover how important they are in creating strong, independent women. This book is recommended for readers of modern fiction and who are interested in family relationships and how secrets can tie up lives for many years.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2011

    AWESOME!!!!!

    I think this book is totally worth it! It was nothing i expected, it was even better than what i expected! Though its not really appropriate for 11 or 12 year olds. Thats the downside of it. Overall, its reaaally good.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2011

    LOVE it!!!!

    such a real life book. A must read. My daughter loved it to and finished it in one night

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    Nice Beach Read.

    Kept my interest the entire time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 18, 2010

    Fabulous read!

    I loved this book - I didn't want to put it down or want it to end. Great characters, storyline. This is not your typical run of the mill novel. Very original - great characters!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2013

    I usually don't do book reviews because most of the time I am ve

    I usually don't do book reviews because most of the time I am very happy with the stories. And I was very happy with this story up untill I find out the ending of the book. I feel like the supporting characters all have learned a life lesson and also grown in their personalities. But I feel the main character did not learn anything from the circumstances that her actions put her in, and I feel that there was no personal growth within herself or her choices.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 20, 2011

    Overall Good Read

    In typical Crouch style, this book is a bit dark and hard to begin but as you keep reading you also find yourself unable to put it down, wanting to know more. The main character's unfailing faith in her father causes a rift within the family but also keeps them connected. What she learns about the relationships within her family and with those close to her spins her world around and helps her to finally come to an understanding about her father.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Another great novel by Katie Crouch!

    I've read another Katie Crouch book, and I really liked it. This one did not disappoint.

    It took a little for me to get used to the narrator's voice. But once I got used to her voice I really got into the book.

    Hanna was so messed up, but she really was a great character. I went from feeling bad for her to being so angry at her, and back again. She had some great grounding forces in her life though. Her brother Palmer (who also has some issues) and her mother Daisy were great characters also. They had dealt with what Hanna was so unwilling to really deal with, and while they understood her issues I think they were ready for her just get on with things.

    The ending was really touching. I think I like the audiobooks more because it's harder for me to guess what is going to happen, and so the endings are always a surprise for me. I really liked the ending of this one. While it was a "happy" ending it wasn't what I would have expected to happen.

    Crouch writes with so much humor in her books. Given the depressing topics she writes about the humor is a much needed relief. I think without the humor this would have been a very sad book. Not having dealt with what Hanna is going through I still was able to understand her because Crouch's writing makes it so easy to relate to the characters.

    Again Crouch has written a great novel!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 15, 2010

    Good entertainment

    ..... Crouch has a good feel for the city of Charleston and seems to enjoy the characters she has created. This is the story of a woman with many, many issues. After destroying her marriage once again, she heads home to her family. Here she faces the problem that is the lynch-pin to all the others; the disappearance of her father when she was quite young. Ms. Crouch moves the story along at a good readable pace and does not get overly melodramatic. A controlling mother, a wishy-washy ex-boyfriend, a brother with his own issues and a stepfather who does not come close to the stereotype round out the players in this good, quick read.

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  • Posted April 27, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Men and Dogs is a dysfunctional delight.

    Hannah is a lovable mess of a main character. Her immediate family and friends are a close second. The mysterious disappearance of the town doctor, her father, has affected the making and keeping of their relationships for nearly 25 years. Hannah decides that the key to putting her life back together is in solving her father's disappearance. Where others see a tragic boating accident with no body recovered, Hannah sees a small town puzzle complete with lies and hidden agendas. You will root for Hannah while also wanting to put a muzzle on her. Crouch has a fresh, quirky style that keeps pace with her dynamic characters. This will be a quick read with equal parts chuckles and exasperation.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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