Men at Arnhem / Edition 1

Men at Arnhem / Edition 1

5.0 2
by Geoffrey Powell
     
 

ISBN-10: 0850529662

ISBN-13: 9780850529661

Pub. Date: 08/29/2003

Publisher: Pen & Sword Books Limited

In the fall of 1944, Allied commanders planned to land airborne divisions in an attempt to capture a series of bridges behind German lines, including the "bridge too far" at Arnhem. Geoffrey Powell, himself a veteran of the Arnhem operation, drew on conversations with many other survivors of the battle to write one of the most dramatic of all accounts of the

Overview

In the fall of 1944, Allied commanders planned to land airborne divisions in an attempt to capture a series of bridges behind German lines, including the "bridge too far" at Arnhem. Geoffrey Powell, himself a veteran of the Arnhem operation, drew on conversations with many other survivors of the battle to write one of the most dramatic of all accounts of the battle

When the book was first published in 1976 under a pseudonym, it was at once recognized as one of the finest evocations of an infantryman's war ever written.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780850529661
Publisher:
Pen & Sword Books Limited
Publication date:
08/29/2003
Edition description:
First Paperback Edition
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.66(d)

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Men at Arnhem 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this to be an excellent read as it shares a British perspective of this battle of the war. It almost would seem that the British felt this was by no means a failure but rather a personal perspective of the fight, dealing with the author's relationship with his fellow soldiers.
Southwell More than 1 year ago
Quite simply, I consider this book a hidden gem in first-person accounts on World War II. Although "A Bridge Too Far" is the definitive narrative on Market-Garden and the Battle of Arnhem, this book does a wonderful job of detailing the battle at a more personal level. Many of the problems the British paratroopers had attacking, holding, and finally retreating from the Dutch city are carefully detailed by Powell. Going into excellent detail about the events of each day after his battalion landed, Powell takes the reader into the fog of war and his reactions to combat. These details are not just at the personal level, such as his hunger and discomfort, but about the battle. Powell documents the path his dwindling battalion takes through Heavedorp and Oosterbeek that other accounts leave out or briefly mention. These details create a vivid picture of Powell's experiences, and make the book hard to put down. I would call it a must-read for anyone interested in Arnhem or paratroopers in WWII.