Menopause For Dummies

Menopause For Dummies

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by Marcia L. Jones PhD, Theresa Eichenwald MD
     
 

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As baby boomers hit their late forties and fifties, women are entering menopause in record numbers. Soon, for the first time in history, there will be more women beyond menopause than have yet to go through it. Yet, amazingly, getting reliable, practical information about menopause isn’t easy. Usually the only information you’re likely to find is in the

Overview

As baby boomers hit their late forties and fifties, women are entering menopause in record numbers. Soon, for the first time in history, there will be more women beyond menopause than have yet to go through it. Yet, amazingly, getting reliable, practical information about menopause isn’t easy. Usually the only information you’re likely to find is in the glossy brochures from pharmaceutical companies scattered around your gynecologist’s waiting room. If you’re really persistent, you can hunt down an article or two in medical journals, but it’s a safe bet that you’ll be sound asleep long before you find straightforward answers even to one of your practical questions.

Whether you’re going through the change, have already been there, or are about to start off down that road, you’ll find the information you need in Menopause For Dummies. In plain English, it covers all the health issues and therapy choices that confront women during the menopausal years. It helps y ou:

  • Put menopause in perspective
  • Understand how it can affect your body, emotions ,and libido
  • Evaluate your risk of disease
  • Know all your therapy options
  • Make sense of the hormone therapy debate
  • Ask intelligent questions and discuss your alternatives with you doctor
  • Make smarter life-style choices
  • Live a long, healthy life

Menopause For Dummies gives you accurate, up-to-date information from the most credible sources, including the latest medical studies, without a lot of technical jargon. You get straightforward advice and guidance on:

  • Recognizing the signs of menopause
  • Preventing and treating osteoporosis
  • Cardiovascular disease and menopause
  • Vaginal and urinary changes during menopause
  • The effects of menopause on your skin, hair, and nasal cavities
  • Menopause and your sex life
  • Hormone therapy and heart disease, breast cancer, and other cancers
  • Alternative therapies
  • Menopause and good nutrition
  • The benefits of exercise during menopause

Menopause is not a disease, and it doesn’t have to be a harbinger of accelerated aging and declining health. Menopause For Dummies gives you the information you need to take charge of your menopause and make this transition as comfortable and healthy as possible.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764554582
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/28/2002
Series:
For Dummies Series
Pages:
354
Product dimensions:
7.42(w) x 9.32(h) x 0.82(d)

Meet the Author

Marcia L. Jones, PhD, has been a freelance writer for more than 18 years.

Theresa Eichenwald, MD, is an internist with extensive experience in caring for menopausal women.

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Menopause For Dummies 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The following may sound like an unimportant fact but it is not. The author claims that the term progesterone is a class of drugs and the most commonly used member of this class are progestins. This is incorrect and the mistaken information leads to serious consequences. Progesterone is the name of a hormone; the only hormone a women makes after ovulation and to a lesser extent in the adrenal glands. The class of drugs is progestins. So progesterone, the natural hormone, is a member of the class of chemicals called progestins. Only progesterone has bio-identical effects on the body. The commonly used progestins such as Provera, are altered chemicals with some very different effects on the body. Provera, for example, causes birth defects. Without high levels of progesterone, on the other hand, you cannot carry the baby to full term. Progesterone reduces the risk of breast cancer by 80%, according to Dr, David Zava, co-author of "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer", Provera does not. I recommend Dr. John Lee's book, "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause" as a must read for the full story.
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