Mentor: Guiding the Journey of Adult Learners / Edition 1

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Overview

"This is a wonderful book, deservedly a classic. Daloz has written an evocative analysis of the promises, joys, problems, and contradictions endemic to mentoring. Packed with recognizable and truthful vignettes, the book is full of helpful advice grounded in a lifetime's experience."
—Stephen D. Brookfield, Distinguished Professor, University of St. Thomas

"Nowhere else are learning, development, and mentoring so vividly and engagingly written about than in Daloz's book.... Already a classic in the field, this second edition updates us all on the awesome power and responsibility inherent in the mentor's role."
—Sharan B. Merriam, professor, Department of Adult Education, University of Georgia

"Essential reading.... This book will help more of us grow into one of the most life-giving relationships we can have with another person, one that will bring deep fulfillment to our own souls. Daloz has given a great gift to all who teach and learn."
—Parker J. Palmer, author of The Courage to Teach

"Daloz's stories help us imagine building the kinds of student-mentor relationships that enable students to cultivate strong, articulate voices, claim the powers of mind, and become more deeply connected citizens of the world."
—Mary Field Belenky, coauthor of Women's Ways of Knowing and author of A Tradition That Has No Name

"This wonderful classic has developed and matured, offering educators across all contexts new insights into how the challenging relationship between teacher and learner can become a source of growth for both partners in the journey."
—M. Carolyn Clark, associate professor of adult education, Texas A&M University

Revised and updated from the award-winning classic, Effective Teaching and Mentoring, this second edition is a practical, engaging exploration of mentoring and its power to transform learning. Filled with inspiring vignettes, Mentor shows how anyone who teaches can become a successful mentor to students.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This is a wonderful book, deservedly a classic. Daloz has written an evocative analysis of the promises, joys, problems, and contradictions endemic to mentoring. Packed with recognizable and truthful vignettes, the book is full of helpful advice grounded in a lifetime's experience." (Stephen D. Brookfield, Distinguished Professor, University of St. Thomas)

"Nowhere else are learning, development, and mentoring so vividly and engagingly written about than in Daloz's book.... Already a classic in the field, this second edition updates us all on the awesome power and responsibility inherent in the mentor's role." (Sharan B. Merriam, Professor, Department of Adult Education, University of Georgia)

"Essential reading.... This book will help more of us grow into one of the most life-giving relationships we can have with another person, one that will bring deep fulfillment to our own souls. Daloz has given a great gift to all who teach and learn." (Parker J. Palmer, author of The Courage to Teach)

"Daloz's stories help us imagine building the kinds of student-mentor relationships that enable students to cultivate strong, articulate voices, claim the powers of mind, and become more deeply connected citizens of the world." (Mary Field Belenky, coauthor of Women's Ways of Knowing and author of A Tradition That Has No Name)

"This wonderful classic has developed and matured, offering educators across all contexts new insights into how the challenging relationship between teacher and learner can become a source of growth for both partners in the journey." (M. Carolyn Clark, associate professor of adult education, Texas A&M University)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787940720
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/20/1999
  • Series: Higher and Adult Education Series
  • Edition description: Subsequent
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 505,608
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

LAURENT A. DALOZ is an associate director and faculty member at the Whidbey Institute, a learning center on Whidbey Island, Washington. He served as mentor to adult students for many years as faculty with the Norwich University Adult Degree Program, the Johnson College External Degree Program, and the Lesley College Intensive Residency Option.
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Table of Contents

ADULT LEARNING AS DEVELOPMENT.

First Shards: The Search for Meaning as a Motive for Learning.

Mentors, Myths, and Metamorphosis: Education as a Transformational Journey.

Maps of Transformation: How Adults Change and Develop.

LEARNING AS A TRANSFORMATIVE JOURNEY.

The Deep and Savage Way: The Unsettling First Steps of an Educational Journey.

The Dynamic of Transformation: How Learning Changes the Learner.

Returning Home: Helping Adults Integrate New Insights.

FOSTERING ADULT LEARNING.

The Ecology of Adult Learning: Barriers and Incentives to Learning and Growth.

The Yoda Factor: Guiding Adults Through Difficult Transitions.

The Art of the Mentor: Limits and Possibilities.

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First Chapter

First Shards

The Search for Meaning as a Motive for Learning



"What is education? I should suppose that education was the curriculum one had to run through in order to catch up with oneself."
--Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling

We are all adult learners. Most of us have learned a good deal more out of school than in it. We have learned from our families, our work, our friends. We have learned from problems resolved and tasks achieved, but also from mistakes confronted and illusions unmasked. Intentionally or not, we have learned from the dilemmas our lives hand us daily.

When the Thunder Comes

The ski trails on the side of Mt. Mansfield were etched white against the blue of the horizon as the car glided around the corner, a bit fast for the icy conditions. It was one of those perfect winter days, utterly clear but still below zero in midmorning. Glittering flakes of frozen air drifted in the sunlight as a carful of skiers heading for the mountain passed me in the opposite direction, eager no doubt to play in the fresh powder of yesterday's storm. Days like today are the stuff of postcards, I thought to myself, everything in its Sunday best. Yet there's something glossy and unreal about the countryside in winter. People who live here know what's under the snow, and one needn't drive far off the main roads to see the trailers and the shacks, the shattered doors and the torn polyethylene covering windows, to know that Vermont Life is a magazine intended mostly for export.

As I drove, my mind kept returning to the conversation with Emerald. I was intrigued with how she used language-that extraordinary concreteness: a course in the Old Testament would "give religion," archeology would "give a kind of scientific answer," "Religion only goes back to 3000 b.c. Darwin goes back a couple million...." There was a coarseness about how she packaged the ideas in their words, yet a marvelous poetry in her vision: "And when the thunder comes, he knows he didn't do it." Did that tangibility have something to do with her intellectual growth, or was it simply her personality? Would education blunt her intrinsic sensibility? How could I honor her curiosity without harming her innocence?

Running Low

The clouds had already slipped beneath the sun as I pulled into Ed's place, a ragged farmhouse connected to the barn by a ramshackle chain of sheds. Ed still owned the land the house was on but had auctioned off the rest two years ago when his farm went under, a victim of economic forces he refused to understand. Ed, Emerald, and thousands like them are part of a major revolution in higher education, one that has seen the proportion of older students in classrooms double within a single generation. Spurred by declining enrollments among traditional-age students and by a growing recognition that many adults want to continue their education but lack the means, a number of colleges began to design special programs during the 1970s to accommodate the new student. Because most adults had jobs, courses were offered at night or on weekends, and degree requirements became more flexible; classes were longer and less frequent. Because the majority were parents, part-time study became more available and financing more appropriate. And because the age range of this new group was considerably greater than that of traditional students, new assumptions were made about how best to teach and support them. After all, the conventional curriculum had evolved in response to the relatively innocent and distinctly different needs of late adolescents. People like Emerald bore a breadth of experience and depth of emotional capacity largely unavailable to traditional college-age students. To attempt to teach a thirty-five-year-old widow in the same way one would an eighteen-year-old halfback did not make good sense.

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