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Menus Made Easy: Or How to Order Dinner and Give the Dishes Their French Names
     

Menus Made Easy: Or How to Order Dinner and Give the Dishes Their French Names

by Nancy Lake
 

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From the Preface.

One of the chief aims of the Art of Cookery is variety. In the following pages so large a number of dishes are given that no difficulty can be experienced in attaining that object. That this is so is, in a measure, evidenced by the fact that so many editions have already been called for.

In the present edition the work has been divided into

Overview

From the Preface.

One of the chief aims of the Art of Cookery is variety. In the following pages so large a number of dishes are given that no difficulty can be experienced in attaining that object. That this is so is, in a measure, evidenced by the fact that so many editions have already been called for.

In the present edition the work has been divided into sections under its chapters, and in each section the dishes have been arranged in alphabetical order, for greater convenience of reference.

Many dishes have been added, while others that have ceased to be in demand have been struck out.

There will be found considerable additions in the entremets, both sweet and savoury, in the treatment of various fruits, and in iced dishes now so much in request.

The increased facilities for ice-making, due to the number of inexpensive freezing machines now obtainable, have made such dishes much more general than they were a few years back. A variety of them is now given, and in addition to the sweet ices, those made with fish, vegetables, cheese, etc.

The author has adhered to her principle of not including dishes that take their name merely from the mould in which they are prepared, such as Belgrave, Monaco, Trois Frères, etc. Exception must, however, be made in the case of some that have secured for themselves a position in the culinary world that is likely to survive when the moulds after which they are called may have fallen into disuse. Examples of these are shown in Bombes, Plombières, and Timbales.

Neither are such dishes enumerated as owe their name to a passing interest, such as the visit of some foreign royalty, . a prominent statesman or general, or some social event or ceremonial. These dishes have no culinary importance. They often hardly differ from those already well known. Such interest as they have would be purely historical, and even were the event worth recording, the study of history is not profitably pursued in the kitchen!

The subject of decoration of dishes will be found to be touched upon in the Introduction. One additional suggestion is now offered. The garnish of flowers or ferns has occasionally been introduced. This the author desires strongly to deprecate. Not to speak of the possibility of spiders or earwigs, in such a position flowers become technically weeds, i.e. plants out of place. They are certainly not intended to be eaten, and a non-edible decoration is suggestive of the waxen figures and such abominations that have now happily died out.

It is hoped that the alterations made will render this little book more useful to those who, while desirous of a well-ordered cuisine, have yet little time to spare from more important and more profitable occupations, for the consideration of " the pleasures of the table."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781540889706
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
12/07/2016
Pages:
298
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.62(d)

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