Mercy, Unbound [NOOK Book]

Overview

Mercy O'Connor is becoming an angel.

She can feel her wings sprouting from her shoulder blades. They itch. Sometimes she even hears them rustling.

And angels don't need to eat. So Mercy has decided she doesn't need to either. She is not sick, doesn't suffer from anorexia, is not trying to kill herself. ...
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Mercy, Unbound

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Overview

Mercy O'Connor is becoming an angel.

She can feel her wings sprouting from her shoulder blades. They itch. Sometimes she even hears them rustling.

And angels don't need to eat. So Mercy has decided she doesn't need to either. She is not sick, doesn't suffer from anorexia, is not trying to kill herself. She is an angel, and angels simply don't need food.

When her parents send her to an eating disorder clinic, Mercy is scared and confused. She isn't like the other girls who are so obviously sick. If people could just see her wings, they would know. But her wings don't come and Mercy begins to have doubts. What if she isn't really an angel? What if she's just a girl? What if she is killing herself? Can she stop?
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Antieau's (Coyote Cowgirl, for adults) rather cumbersome first young-adult novel centers on a 15-year-old suffering an eating disorder who believes she is becoming an angel. Though Mercy confesses that she is hungry, she insists that if she eats, "I'll lose my wings." The narrative chronicles her interactions with others-her high-strung environmental lawyer mother, her calm professor-of-literature father and her fellow patients at a treatment center for eating disorders ("My mother does not see the irony of taking me to a hospital called Mercywood"). The narrative reveals the lingering effects of Mercy's losses: her younger brother was stillborn, her dog died and her beloved grandmother (who nearly starved in a Nazi concentration camp) moved away. After the two latter events, Mercy confides to her new friends at Mercywood that she did have an eating disorder "but it went away." She also shares with them the dream that first made her realize that she is an angel. After watching a news report about AIDS orphans in Africa, she dreamed that she was leaning over a dying person, "my wings stretched out like an umbrella over the two of us, and I was whispering-bestowing compassion and mercy in a world that really needs it." Although the writing can be lyrical, readers may feel that the moral ultimately drives the story. Unlike the more realistic Skin (reviewed above), this novel overlays a heavy (albeit uplifting) message that masks the moments of true connection-between Mercy and her parents, and Mercy and her peers. Ages 14-up. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 8-10-Mercy, 15, believes that she is growing wings and becoming an angel. According to her, these celestial beings are not human and therefore they do not have to eat. The teen does not understand why her parents insist on getting her treatment for an eating disorder that she obviously does not have. She's an angel, not a girl. Forced to attend a treatment center in New Mexico, she meets others who have eating disorders of varying severity. Mercy sees the similarity in their habits but still stays true to her convictions. Then she sees her friends getting sick and notices that her wings are not growing, and she begins to question what is really going on. A tragic event leaves her confused and with a loss of memory. The text alternates between Mercy's thoughts in italics and her first-person narrative of the events as they unfold in bold. Mercy's belief that she is an angel taps into the delusional thinking that often accompanies such disorders. This novel takes a common topic in young adult fiction and adds atypical characteristics. It will appeal to a wide range of young women.-Kristen M. Todd, Middle Country Public Library, Centereach, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416934592
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse
  • Publication date: 10/25/2011
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 412,873
  • Age range: 14 years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Kim Antieau is the author of Mercy, Unbound. She lives with her husband in the Pacific Northwest.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

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(6)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 2, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Absolutely Amazing

    Regardless of how cliche it sounds, this book was marvelous. It's a realistic tale of a teenager trying to find herself and give reason to a world of pain.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2006

    THIS IS A REALLY GOOD BOOK !!!

    i looooved this book....as soon as i started reading it...i read it all the way through.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2006

    amazing

    This is probably one of my favorite books. I've read it twice now & both times I couldn't put it down. I'm also 15 and suffering from an eating disorder. After reading this book though, I looked at it in a different light. I would strongly recommend this book to any highschool or older aged teen dealing with such issues.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2006

    Must Read

    Okay so I just finished reading an awesome book and I think any girl should read it. It's called Mercy, unbound by Kim Antieau. It's about a girl who thinks she's an angel who wants to change the world but can't b/c she is just one girl. Her parents send her to an eating disorder clinic because she doesn't eat. Thing is she doesn't eat because she thinks angels don't eat so why does she have to. Even though the beginning is a bit of a drag you later come to find you like it towards the end. It leaves you with a happy feeling in the end. Yes, there is a reference to god but the main character makes it much more than just a man or a woman. She even goes through different religions so it's in a sense unique. If you have no idea what I am talking about or think I am nutz all I have to say is just read the book and go from there.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

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    Posted May 25, 2010

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    Posted June 29, 2009

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    Posted October 31, 2008

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    Posted November 23, 2008

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