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Metamorphosis and Other Stories: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) [NOOK Book]

Overview

For the 125th anniversary of Kafka's birth, an astonishing new translation of his best-known stories, in a spectacular graphic package

For all his fame, Franz Kafka published only a small number of stories in his lifetime. This new translation of those stories, by Michael Hofmann, one of the most respected German-to-English translators at work today, makes Kafka's best-known works available to a new generation of readers. Metamorphosis gives ...
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Metamorphosis and Other Stories: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

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Overview

For the 125th anniversary of Kafka's birth, an astonishing new translation of his best-known stories, in a spectacular graphic package

For all his fame, Franz Kafka published only a small number of stories in his lifetime. This new translation of those stories, by Michael Hofmann, one of the most respected German-to-English translators at work today, makes Kafka's best-known works available to a new generation of readers. Metamorphosis gives full expression to the breadth of Kafka's literary vision and the extraordinary depth of his imagination.


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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"I think of a Kafka story as a perfect work of literary art, as approachable as it is strange, and as strange as it is approachable."
-Michael Hofmann
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101578797
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/26/2008
  • Series: Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition Series
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 661,816
  • File size: 383 KB

Meet the Author

Franz Kafka
Franz Kafka (1883-1924) was born of Jewish parents in Prague. Several of his story collections were published in his lifetime and his novels, The Trial, The Castle, and Amerika, were published posthumously by his editor Max Brod.

Michael Hofmann has translated the work of Joseph Roth, Herta Müller, Zoë Jenny, Wim Wenders, Wolfgang Koeppen, and Franz Kafka.



Michael Hofmann has translated the work of Joseph Roth, Herta Müller, Zoë Jenny, Wim Wenders, Wolfgang Koeppen, and Franz Kafka.


Biography

Franz Kafka was born in 1883 to a well-to-do middle-class Jewish family. His father, the self-made proprietor of a wholesale haberdashery business, was a domineering man whose approbation Franz continually struggled to win. The younger Kafka's feelings of inadequacy and guilt form the background of much of his work and are made explicit in his "Letter to His Father" (excerpted in this volume), which was written in 1919 but never sent.

Kafka was educated in the German language schools of Prague and at the city's German University, where in 1908 he took a law degree. Literature, however, remained his sole passion. At this time he became part of a literary circle that included Franz Werfel, Martin Buber, and Kafka's close friend Max Brod. Encouraged by Brod, Kafka published the prose collection Observations in 1913. Two years later his story "The Stoker" won the Fontaine prize. In 1916 he began work on The Trial and between this time and 1923 produced three incomplete novels as well as numerous sketches and stories. In his lifetime some of his short works did appear: The Judgment (1916), The Metamorphosis (1916), The Penal Colony (1919), and The Country Doctor (1919).

Before his death of tuberculosis in 1924, Kafka had charged Max Brod with the execution of his estate, ordering Brod to burn the manuscripts. With the somewhat circular justification that Kafka must have known his friend could not obey such an order, Brod decided to publish Kafka's writings. To this act of "betrayal" the world owes the preservation of some of the most unforgettable and influential literary works of our century.

Biography courtesy of BN.com

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    1. Date of Birth:
      July 3, 1883
    2. Place of Birth:
      Prague, Austria-Hungary
    1. Date of Death:
      June 3, 1924
    2. Place of Death:
      Vienna, Austria
    1. Education:
      German elementary and secondary schools. Graduated from German Charles-Ferdinand University of Prague.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 243 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(82)

4 Star

(70)

3 Star

(41)

2 Star

(19)

1 Star

(31)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 245 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 16, 2009

    Brilliant Kafka

    Metamorphosis and Other Stories provides some of Franz Kafka's best work, including the title story, of course. The Metamorphosis is easily the best story in the book, though there are other gems like "The Stoker" and "In the Penal Colony." As is the case with Kafka, some of the endings are abrupt and can leave you wanting, such as the end to "The Judgment." The one weak story in the book is "Josephine the Singer," which you learn from the introduction was the last piece he ever wrote as he was dying of illness. A must-have for Kafka fans everywhere.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2004

    There is no Kafka like Kafka and Kafka is his prophet

    The uncanny originality of these most remarkable stories and parables by arguably the most precise delineator of the human mind in all its fear , anxiety and beauty will spellbind the reader, and provide Literature at the very highest level. One of the great books which as Camus said of Kafka demands rereading and rereading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A great work and read!

    Franz Kafka is one of my all time favorite writers. The Metamorphosis is a wonderfully written story that relies heavily on dialogue, inner monologue and subtle clues rather than big plot twists although it does establish a solid plot line, just one that is not filled with action in every page. There is a great deal of attention being paid to details so it's important to follow it up.
    Change is the main theory behind this book, obviously as the name suggests and how humans handle change, our responsibilities that effects the changes we go through and an ugly side of parent and child relationships.
    The language is a lot different than one a native English speaker is used to, Kafka's use of language, diction and descriptions are quite different than one may be used to. However it creates a great contrast and highlights the differences between U.S. English writers and those of others,which enables one to discover different mentalities in humanity.

    It's a great read with delightful language that made the mirage of fiction more into a reality for me. Though I must admit, a lot of people have difficulty with this book. So approach it with a grain of salt and an open mind.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    Good read

    Excellent read for someone that is just being introduced to the world of Kafka. Great samples of the stile and depth of the writer.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2008

    Moving

    Out of the book, I only read 'The Metamorphosis.' It was a school assignment, and I thought it would be incredibly dull, but in fact, the story is fast paced, bizarre, and full of irony and dark humor while still expressing the depths of human nature. I was deeply moved by 'The Metamorphosis,' and I recommend it wholeheartedly to anyone who enjoys reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 5, 2014

    Great collection for my ebook library. I can dive into these st

    Great collection for my ebook library. I can dive into these stories quite easily whenever I'm in the mood for some deep-thought explorations. Kafka was a master of the human condition.

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  • Posted October 18, 2013

    I enjoyed Metamorphosis and Other Stories. Some have said Metam

    I enjoyed Metamorphosis and Other Stories. Some have said Metamorphosis is the best but I enjoyed most of the others. If you have not read it take the time to read it. It is well worth the money and time.

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  • Posted June 6, 2013

    The story is good but it is about a guy that turns into a giant

    The story is good but it is about a guy that turns into a giant roach and it's really freaky. I don't like bugs and it's really creepy to read about it, also a little depressing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    Well written & Interesting

    Needed to read this for a class and ended up loving it. Its beautifully sad.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    Metamorphosis

    Its not simply about adjastment to change in life. Kafka attacts the character of any weak human who allows oneself to be first overcharged and used, then changed into helpless creature. Its about the importance of knowing your value and respecting your life, and foreseeing your own destiny. Kafka shows how having others who are willfull and strong in protecting their own being and own lifestyle could bring the wondering one to the ultimate end.

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  • Posted August 6, 2012

    Like the introduction says, each of Kafka's stories here is abou

    Like the introduction says, each of Kafka's stories here is about failure. He is so great at making a cariciature of what we all must endure day after day in our lives. I read all the stories except for one or two. The one I remember with most detail is The Metamorphosis. This is about a young man, Gregor, who works as a clerk in a business office. He is the main income for his family, which consists of his parents and sister. The fact that his is the main income of the family is taken for granted by them. One morning he wakes and discovers that he is transformed (metamorphosized) into something (I won't tell you what exactly because that will ruin your fun) which disables him from earning an income, leaving the house, or doing anything at all except remain in his room all day, now completely dependent on his family. His transformation is hilarious because of the way Kafka writes in such detail the patheticness of Gregor's attempts. Gregor does not overcome his transformation, he utterfly fails; I haven't spoiled the story by stating that because that is not the point of the story; all of Kafka's characters are failures from the start. You will have to take note of his family's responses to Gregor's transformation; this is the real story.

    You won't enjoy Kafka's stories unless you have a sense of humor and/or you appreciate exisitentialism.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Really tough reading..

    I found the stories slow and monotonous. The idea of The Metamorphosis sounds interesting, but I found it rather boring. I was initially drawn to this book because of Franz Kafka's influences on German culture and various authors. But by modern day times, this book is just too tedious.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    No

    I was a sophmore in highschool when I read this book and i hated it, along with most people that I talk to

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    Why the dung beetle?

    I must be missing some metaphors or something cause im upset at the ending.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Strange but good

    There is a reason that "kafkaesque" means "surreal." The short stories in this book read like dreams/nightmares you would have after eating ham and sauerkraut pizza immediately before bed. I enjoyed their strangeness and trying to figure out what point (if any) Kafka was trying to make in them (alienation seems to be a recurring theme).

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  • Posted August 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good short read

    If you are looking for a short novel that has more than one layer---Kafkha is the right author for you! He will make you think!

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  • Posted August 13, 2011

    Interesting Collection

    This particular edition of Franz Kafka's stories includes some lesser known works with more popular ones. The standout stories for me are "The Metamorphosis" and "The Hunger Artist". The translations were great and did not use too many esoteric words. Some of the stories were just a little boring for my tastes, like In The Penal Colony. Kafka's stories are all strange, but they all have profound messages.

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  • Posted May 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    How to explain why Kafka was a master?

    The guy's writing is simple yet high concept... Subtle points made in blunt situations... Comedic in some scenes that discuss truly dire plots. "Metamorphosis" is a good example of that. Let's face it - a guy waking up and discovering he has turned into a bug is not a happy plot. Yet the first half of the story reads as a mild comedy - and it is not until the end and thinking about it that the really scarily sad point of the story becomes obvious.

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  • Posted November 21, 2010

    Crazily Deep

    The Metamorphosis / 978-1-411-43268-0 When I was in 9th grade, my somewhat harried teacher attempted to assign me Ovid's Metamorphosis (a collection of Greek myths) and instead assigned me Kafka's Metamorphosis. Kafka's tale is short but packed with vivid symbolism in which a young man inexplicably wakes up one day as a large roach creature and subsequently fails to turn back into a man. After a confusing night with the novel, I reported back to the befuddled teacher, and she substituted another book, much to my relief. Years later, I now reread Kafka with an adult's awe and appreciation, rather than the child's confusion. The novel is packed with deep symbolism and, even now, I could not tell you with confidence what it "means". I believe the story is of being trapped in a family that does not appreciate you, except for what you can do for them, and I believe the sad ending masks an even sadder one - that the young daughter will soon become the new symbolic 'roach' to the family, bringing in resources but never loved or appreciated. However, I have heard other interpretations, each meaningful and special. I recommend this book, but the first read through should be with a light eye, not questioning the strangeness nor looking too hard for meaning. Rather, I think Kafka is best when you allow the impressions to kind of wash over you as you go. ~ Ana Mardoll

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  • Posted October 13, 2010

    Moderately Recommended

    Metamorphosis by Kafka was a really good and interesting book. I recommend it to everyone. I believe everyone can relate to this novel in a different aspect. Whether you are a bug or an individual who is hopeless (Gregor), or you just want to learn a moral lesson about life. This book is good, but not great. It can be relevant to any person, but one can also get lost reading it. However, overall this book was an interesting book to read.

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