Metaphysics (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

Metaphysics (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

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by Aristotle
     
 

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"The motive which inspires Aristotle throughout the Metaphysics is the wish to acquire that form of knowledge which is most worthy of the name of wisdom." -- W. D. Ross

Many of the great and perennial problems in philosophy are to be found in Aristotle's Metaphysics. Aristotle thought that wonder at the world around us, and at the "world…  See more details below

Overview


"The motive which inspires Aristotle throughout the Metaphysics is the wish to acquire that form of knowledge which is most worthy of the name of wisdom." -- W. D. Ross

Many of the great and perennial problems in philosophy are to be found in Aristotle's Metaphysics. Aristotle thought that wonder at the world around us, and at the "world beyond physics" was the beginning of philosophy. However, in a less romantic vein he also thought that the task of philosophy was, in a sense, to extinguish wonder by offering complete explanations of all there was to wonder about. Among the varied topics covered in this work, Aristotle philosophizes on reality, unity, fact and value, truth, and causation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411429949
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
1,190,817
File size:
674 KB

Meet the Author


Aristotle was born at Stagira in Chalcidice, now part of Northern Greece, in 384 BC. Aristotle supervised the education of Alexander the Great, and later he established a school for philosophy called the Lyceum. His other works include Nicomachean Ethics and Politics.

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Metaphysics 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Richard_P_Cember More than 1 year ago
I begin with two disclaimers: (1) I do not presume to "review" Aristotle, and (2) I do not know Greek. This is a 1912 translation by a gentleman named John H. McMahon. To discover that fact you have to read the copyright page, which seems rather unfair to Mr. McMahon. I found this translation extremely difficult to understand, and the "Metaphysics" is famously difficult in any case. That does not necessarily mean it is a bad translation. I suspect (suspect is all I can do) that it is a very literal translation, and thus may be very useful for some purposes. In any case, however, it was not the right translation for me, as a first-time English reader of "Metaphysics". The 1998 translation by High Tancred-Lawson (Penguin Classics) is much better for a first-time English reader, while that of W. D. Ross (1924) is the one that I recommend more than either this one or the Tancred-Lawson. Michael P. Levine's introductory essay is worth reading, but I would not buy the book just for that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a basic translation of the text of the Metaphysics with a short introduction and few notes. The translation is in a somewhat dated style of formal english, but is clear and as true to the original as any translation can be--and far less expensive than most.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago