Methods for Effective Teaching: Promoting K-12 Student Understanding / Edition 4

Methods for Effective Teaching: Promoting K-12 Student Understanding / Edition 4

by Paul R. Burden, David M. Byrd, David M. Byrd
     
 

ISBN-10: 0205476384

ISBN-13: 9780205476381

Pub. Date: 07/21/2006

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.

The fourth edition of Methods for Effective Teachingprovides research-based coverage of general teaching methods while emphasizing contemporary issues such as promoting student understanding, creating a learning community, differentiating your instruction, and making modifications in instruction due to student differences.  The content is applicable for

Overview

The fourth edition of Methods for Effective Teachingprovides research-based coverage of general teaching methods while emphasizing contemporary issues such as promoting student understanding, creating a learning community, differentiating your instruction, and making modifications in instruction due to student differences.  The content is applicable for teachers at all levels–elementary, middle, and high school.  All content is aligned to professional standards. The numerous features, tables, and lists of recommendations ensure that the text is reader-friendly and practically oriented.

   Its unique content includes strategies to promote student understanding, differentiate your instruction, manage lesson delivery, apply motivational techniques for instruction and assessment, and work with colleagues and parents. In addition, thorough coverage of classroom management and discipline is provided, along with ways to create a positive learning environment.

New to This Edition

•   A new chapter (Ch. 7) on “Strategies that Promote Student Understanding”.

•   Major revision of Chapter 1 on “The Teacher as a Decision Maker”.

•   New sections on managing student work, record keeping, and reporting.

•   New sections on principles for working with students to prevent misbehavior, maintaining appropriate student behavior, and dealing with chronic misbehaviors.

•   Increased coverage of teacher dispositions, integrating technology in instruction, No Child Left Behind, standards, and assessments.

•   Expanded discussion of implications for diverse classrooms anddifferentiating instruction.

•   A new feature in each chapter titled “Sample Standards” showing representative knowledge, dispositions, and skills.

•   Tables showing how standards from INTASC, Praxis II Principles of Learning and Teaching, Praxis III, and the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards are addressed in the book.

•   Fifteen new Voices from the Classroom teacher testimonials.

 

About the Authors

PAUL R. BURDEN is professor and assistant dean in the College of Education at Kansas State University. He is the author of three other books on classroom management and student motivation.DAVID M. BYRD is a professor and director of the School of Education at the University of Rhode Island. He has served as co-editor of the Teacher Education Yearbook series and has written numerous book chapters and articles.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205476381
Publisher:
Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
Publication date:
07/21/2006
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
7.52(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.58(d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

About the Authors.

Standards.

I. FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING METHODS.

1. The Teacher as a Decision Maker.

 Effective Teaching

  Decisions about Basic Teaching Functions

  Essential Teacher Characteristics

  Expectations for Effectiveness

 Standards and Professional Development

  INTASC Standards

  Principles of Learning and Teaching

  A Framework for Teaching

  National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

 The Teacher As A Reflective Decision Maker

  Reflective Practice

  Aspects of Instructional Decision Making

  Reflection and a Constructivist Approach to Teaching

 Reflective Practice and Your Continuous Learning

II. PLANNING INSTRUCTION.

2. The Fundamentals of Planning.

 What is Planning?

  Reasons for Planning

  Planning Phases

  Factors Considered in Planning

  Planning and the Standards Movement

 Approaches to Planning

  The Linear-Rational Model

  The Mental-Image Approach

 Additional Planning Considerations

  Resources for Planning

  Teacher—Student Planning

  Team Planning

  Preparing a Syllabus

  Planning to Motivate Students

  Planning to Use Academic Time Wisely

 How Teachers Really Plan

3. Types of Teacher Planning.

 Types of Teacher Plans

  Course Planning

  Term Planning

  Unit Planning

  Weekly Planning

  Daily Planning

 Components of a Daily Lesson Plan

  Identifying Course Information

  Objectives for the Lesson

  Procedures

  Materials

  Evaluation of Students

  Other Possible Items

4. Differentiating Instruction for Diverse Learners.

 Implications for Diverse Classrooms

 Sources of Student Diversity

  Cognitive Area

  Affective Area

  Physical Area

  Learning Styles

  Creative Potential

  Gender

  Language

  Cultural Diversity

  Disabilities

  Students at Risk

  Socioeconomic Status

 Creating an Inclusive, Multicultural Classroom

  Create a Supportive, Caring Environment

  Offer a Responsive Curriculum

  Vary Your Instruction

  Provide Assistance When Needed

 Differentiating Your Instruction

  Elements of the Curriculum that Can be Differentiated

  Students Characteristics for Which Teachers Can Differentiate

  Instructional Strategies that Facilitate Instruction

 Motivating Diverse Students for Instruction

III. SELECTING INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

5. Direct Instructional Strategies.

 Deductive and Inductive Strategies

 Direct Instructional Approaches

  Direct Instruction

  Presentations

  Demonstrations

  Questions

  Recitations

  Practice and Drills

  Reviews

  Guided Practice and Homework

6. Indirect Instructional Strategies.

 Inductive Approaches

  Concept Attainment Approaches

  Inquiry Lessons

  Projects, Reports, and Problems

 Social Approaches

  Discussions

  Cooperative Learning

  Panels and Debates

  Role Playing, Simulations, and Games

 Independent Approaches

  Learning Centers or Stations

  Contracts and Independent Work

7. Strategies that Promote Student Understanding

 Identifying Similarities and Differences

 Summarizing and Note Taking

  Summarizing

  Note Taking

 Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition

  Reinforcing Effort

  Providing Recognition

 Homework and Practice

  Homework

  Practice

 Nonlinguistic Representations

 Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback

  Setting Objectives

  Providing Feedback

 Generating and Testing Hypotheses

 Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers

  Cues and Questions

  Advance Organizers

IV. MANAGING INSTRUCTION AND THE CLASSROOM.

8. Managing Lesson Delivery.

 Issues Affecting Lesson Delivery

  The Degree of Structure in Lessons

  Grouping Students for Instruction

  Holding Students Academically Accountable

 Managing Parts of the Lesson

  The Beginning of a Lesson

  The Middle of a Lesson

  The Ending of a Lesson

 Managing Student Work

  Managing Seatwork Effectively

  Collecting Assignments and Monitoring Their Completion

  Maintaining Records of Student Work

  Managing Paperwork

  Giving Students Feedback

 Managing Whole-Group Instruction

  Preventing Misbehavior

  Managing Movement Through the Lesson

  Maintaining a Group Focus

  Maintaining Student Attention and Involvement

9. Classroom Management.

 Classroom Management

  Order in the Classroom

  Areas of Responsibility

  Principles for Working with Students and Preventing Misbehavior

  What Effective Behavior Management Accomplishes

 Preparing for the School Year

  Making Management Preparations

  Making Instructional Preparations

  Managing Assessments, Record Keeping, and Reporting

  Establishing a Plan to Deal with Misbehavior

  Planning for the First Day

  Conducting the First Day

 Organizing Your Classroom and Materials

  Floor Space

  Storage Space

  Bulletin Boards and Wall Space

 Selecting and Teaching Rules and Procedures

  Rules

  Procedures

 Maintaining Appropriate Student Behavior

  Having a Mental Set for Management

  Building Positive Teacher-Student Relationships

  Helping Students Assume Responsibility for Their Behavior

  Reinforcing Desired Behaviors

10. Classroom Discipline.

  Misbehavior

  Misbehavior in Context

  Causes of Misbehavior

  Types of Misbehavior

  Degrees of Severity

 Interventions

  The Principle of Least Intervention

  Some Practices to Avoid

  Cautions and Guidelines for Punishment

 A Three-Step Response Plan

  Situational Assistance

  Mild Responses

  Moderate Responses

 Dealing with Chronic Misbehaviors

V. ASSESSING AND REPORTING STUDENT PERFORMANCE.

11. Assessing Student Performance.

 Evaluation

  Types of Evaluation

  Measurement, Assessment, and Evaluation

  Norm-referenced and Criterion-referenced Evaluation

  Characteristics of Good Assessment Instruments

 Establishing a Framework for Evaluation

 Performance-Based Assessments

  Product Assessments

  Performance Assessments

  Ways to Rate Student Products or Performances

 Teacher-Made Tests

  Planning the Classroom Test

  Selecting and Preparing Test Questions

  Assembling the Test

  Administering the Test

  Scoring the Test

 Motivational Strategies Concerning Evaluation and Feedback

12. Grading Systems, Marking, and Reporting.

 Purposes of Grading

  Functions of Grades

  Confounding the Achievement Grade

 Grading Systems

  Percentage Grades

  Letter Grades

  Descriptive Evaluations

  Parent—Teacher Conferences

  Pass—Fail Grading

  Checklists of Objectives

 Assigning Letter Grades

  Determining What to Include in a Grade

  Creating a Composite Score

  Selecting a Frame of Reference for Grading

  Determining the Distribution of Grades

  Calculating Semester and Annual Grades

 Nonachievement Outcomes

  Rating Scales

  Checklists

  Special Reports

 Designing a Gradebook

  Daily Record

  Achievement Scores

  Summary Charts

 Reporting Grades and Communicating to Parents

  Report Cards

  Cumulative Record Files

  Newsletters to All Parents

  Open House

  Parent—Teacher Conferences

  Contacts with Individual Parents

 General Principles in Grading and Reporting

VI. WORKING WITH OTHERS.

13. Working with Colleagues and Parents.

 Working with Colleagues

 Working with Parents

  Reasons for Working with Parents

  Why Some Parents Resist Involvement

  Building a Parental Support System

 Contacting and Communicating with Parents

  Ways to Communicate with Parents

  Parent—Teacher Conferences

References.

Name Index.

Subject Index.

 

 

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >