Mexican Banking and Investment in Transition / Edition 1

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Overview

Banking and investment in Mexico have changed radically over the past decade, and the economic events that prompted these changes will have a significant impact on Mexico's role in regional and world financial markets. Adams traces the evolution of Mexico's banking and investment activities, reviews current conditions and their implications for future investment opportunities in Mexico, and makes clear that what happens to Mexico's economy and political stability will have major implications for what happens elsewhere in the world. One of the first books to look at banking and investment in Mexico after the peso crash of 1994-1995, with a highly detailed bibliography and notes, Adams's study will be important reading for international business, finance, and investment professionals and for their colleagues with similar interests throughout the academic community.

The fate of both Mexico and the United States is that the two countries are forever tied by geography. The historical evolution of the dual interaction between the peoples of these two nations is and will be significant for the future of both countries. With this in mind, the book is divided into chapters reviewing such themes as the interaction and historical financial events that transpired during the advent of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the expansion of cross-border financial and investment services, as well as a framework and background review of the events leading up to and resulting from the devaluations of the 1970s and 1980s, and more recently the evolution of the peso crisis of 1994-1995. The imperceptible yet gradual economic integration of the two economies has required time in developing, while not always being seamless in its implementation and transition. American macroeconomic policy has long had a direct impact on the economy of Mexico, as is evidenced by the impact of U.S. interest rates on the financial underpinnings of the Mexican treasury and the banking system to assist with the overall economic growth of the nation. An appreciation for the historically sensitive issues and perspectives, be they nationalization of the oil industry, immigration, or market access for foreign financial services, is paramount to a fuller understanding of doing business on both sides of the border.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Texas banker Adams traces the evolution of banking and investment activities across the border, reviews current conditions and their implications for future investment opportunities in the country, and argues that what happens to Mexico's economy and political stability will have major implications for the rest of the world. In one of the first studies of Mexican banking since the crash of the peso in 1994- 95, he attributes it to the overwhelming success of the government's neoliberal policy of privatization and inviting foreign investment. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781567200546
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/30/1997
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 266
  • Lexile: 1660L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

JOHN A. ADAMS, JR., is President and CEO of Enterprise Florida Inc., a public-private partnership responsible for leading Florida's statewide economic development efforts. For over 20 years he has been actively involved in international trade, with a specialty in Latin America and an emphasis on emerging industrial and financial markets in Mexico. He has served as a delegate to the GATT negotiations in Geneva, an advisor to the World Trade Organization, Chairman of the Industry Sector Advisory Council for trade policy review at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and has provided Congressional testimony on U.S.-Mexico border infrastructure issues. Adjunct Professor of International Banking and Finance at Texas A&M International University in Laredo, Texas, he speaks widely to industry, government, international trade, and economic development groups around the world, and is the author of many articles, chapters, and books.

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Table of Contents

Figures
Glossary of Terms and Acronyms
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Mexico on the Brink: Turmoil and Change 1
2 Banking and Debt in Mexico 13
3 U.S.-Mexican Border: Crossroads of Trade and Finance 32
4 Regional Trade and Cooperation 51
5 Investment in Mexico 67
6 The Christmas Surprise: Devaluation 1994 87
7 Crisis of Confidence: 1995 112
8 Tequila Hangover: Impact of the Peso Crisis on Argentina 135
9 Back from the Abyss 153
App. A Mexican Banking and Financial Milestones, 1935-97 179
App. B Foreign Investment Law, December 27, 1993 181
App. C Foreign Ownership Allowed in 1993 Investment Law 194
Bibliography 199
Index 233
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