×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Mexican Mafia
     

The Mexican Mafia

2.9 16
by Tony Rafael
 

See All Formats & Editions


It has been called the most dangerous gang in American history. In Los Angeles alone it is responsible for over 100 homicides per year. Although it has fewer than 300 members, it controls a 40,000-strong street army that is eager to advance its agenda. It waves the flag of the Black Hand and its business is murder. Although known on the streets for over fifty

Overview


It has been called the most dangerous gang in American history. In Los Angeles alone it is responsible for over 100 homicides per year. Although it has fewer than 300 members, it controls a 40,000-strong street army that is eager to advance its agenda. It waves the flag of the Black Hand and its business is murder. Although known on the streets for over fifty years, the Mexican Mafia has flown under the radar of public awareness and has flourished beneath a deep cover of secrecy. Members are forbidden even to acknowledge its existence. For the first time in its history, the Mexican Mafia is now getting the attention it has been striving to avoid. In this briskly written and thoroughly researched book, Tony Rafael looks at the birth and the blood-soaked growth of this criminal enterprise through the eyes of the victims, the dropouts, the cops and DAs on the front lines of the war against the Mexican Mafia. The first book ever published on the subject, Southern Soldiers is a pioneering work that unveils the operations of this California prison gang and describes how it grew from a small clique of inmates into a transnational criminal organization. As the first prison gang ever to project its power beyond prison walls, the Mexican Mafia controls virtually every Hispanic neighborhood in Southern California and is rapidly expanding its influence into the entire Southwest, across the East Coast, and even into Canada. Riding a wave of unchecked immigration and seemingly beyond the reach of law enforcement, the Mexican Mafia is poised to become the Cosa Nostra of twenty-first-century America.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Rafael's debut book-a study of the Southern California-based Mexican mafia told mainly from the perspective of veteran Los Angeles deputy district attorney Anthony Manzella-is a revealing but flawed work. Despite occasional national headlines about drive-by shootings that claim innocent lives (including the granddaughter of an LAPD chief), most Americans are probably unfamiliar with the powerful, loosely organized street gangs that make up the Mexican mafia. Rafael does a workmanlike job of tracing the rise of these gangs, despite the occasional factual error (e.g., the RICO statute was used to indict criminal groups besides La Cosa Nostra before the Mexican mafia), but fails to dramatize his overly detailed account of Manzella's trials. Manzella is an interesting enough figure-a dedicated workaholic throwback who doesn't use a computer, or even an electric typewriter. But Rafael gives short shrift to the sociology of the rise of the Mexican mafia. Instead, he offers a final quote from Manzella ("We know exactly the kind of families that produce criminals. I'd like to go in there and take them out. But we can't do that') will leave many with a sour taste that undercuts Rafael's attempts to make the deputy DA a hero. (July)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594032523
Publisher:
Encounter Books
Publication date:
06/16/2009
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
370
Sales rank:
216,203
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.10(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Mexican Mafia 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The books starts with a murder trial in the 2000's of several Eme members were involved in, in the 90's. The it starts talking about what the trial is about. Then during the process it would go into detail of where each member's background. Between each member's background it would go back to the trail. And in between all that it would go into the background of each of the DA's and assistant's backgrounds. Then back to the trial. Then it goes back to just a little bit of the history of where La Eme started. Then to other member's that had nothing to do with anything. Then back to the next trial. And after the trials were over it starts talking about the start of La Eme again for a little bit then back to the trials. A lot of it in between is praises of the author for the DA who put these guys in jail. Just saying all that just confused me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was looking for more of a history of the Mexican Mafia, and what was presented here wasn't really news to me and I really don't know much about this subject matter. While the pull of La Eme is made clear, it really kind of seems like just an extra dimension of randomness heaped on LA's regular street crime. The author seems to try to create more structure than there looks to be. Also, the author really has an axe to grind about the media, activists and political correctness despite there being little to no reason to rant about this stuff in the book. I didn't buy this book to hear about Tom Hayden, or insinuations about Father Boyle. For all the author's talk of others getting their details straight, he misses basic details (El Rukns is the same as the Black P Stones - Chicago gang that happens to have a couple sets in LA) and contradicts some of his own conclusions and premises (greenlighting all Chinos or African Americans as a well articulated organized policy...). Can't have it both ways, la Eme sounds like a rag tag gang within city of gangs. Author should have stuck to the story, not lambasting everyone who was in the wrong in his opinion. Few things in life are perfect. Certainly not society's efforts at eradicating crime....
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was an easy and entertaining read, however I believe that the books focus is more on one event and court case involving La Eme and not the overall history of The Mexican Mafia.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not the right tittle for this book. It talks about court cases and a lot of other stuff that I really didn't care or want to know about. I thought it would be about the history and the ways the Mexican Mafia operates. Very Dissapointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was a great read, I enjoyed it and had trouble putting it down. I do agree though with a comment another reviewer left however and that is that La Nuestra Familia is far more organized and although there is lot's of internal politicking in all prison gangs, no gang has as much politicking as La Eme.
santiago colin More than 1 year ago
it a bad writin book. it should not be under mexican mafia the book was about a damn trial about gangster it sucks i regret buying this book. i really dont recomend this book to at all
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although la Eme has started to receive the media attention that it deserves, some of the information is wildly out of proportion. La Eme is, according to Mr. Rafael, controlling the streets of LA with the whim of their wilas. Strangely enough though, they are infamously dysfunctional in internal politics causing many unwarranted deaths in their top Carnales positions that leaves voids. I would argue, unlike Mr. Rafael, that the La Nuestra Familia has a much more secretive and more organized structure than La Eme/the Mexican Mafia could ever hope to have. That is one of the reasons I believe the Nortenos don't want to business with them: they are simply to volatile, as you will read in these pages as they murder each other over anything. The Mexican Mafia, unlike the Aryan Brotherhood and the Nuestra Familia, has had three very successful Federal RICO indictments thrown at them in which it has severely impeded their business transactions. Many surenos are tempted to go into the NF's banner.