Mexican National Identity: Memory, Innuendo, and Popular Culture / Edition 1

Mexican National Identity: Memory, Innuendo, and Popular Culture / Edition 1

by William H. Beezley
     
 

In this enlightening book, the well-known historian William Beezley contends that a Mexican national identity was forged during the nineteenth century not by a self-anointed elite but rather by a disparate mix of ordinary people and everyday events. In examining independence festivals, children’s games, annual almanacs, and the performances of itinerant

See more details below

Overview

In this enlightening book, the well-known historian William Beezley contends that a Mexican national identity was forged during the nineteenth century not by a self-anointed elite but rather by a disparate mix of ordinary people and everyday events. In examining independence festivals, children’s games, annual almanacs, and the performances of itinerant puppet theaters, Beezley argues that these seemingly unrelated and commonplace occurrences—not the far more self-conscious and organized efforts of politicians, teachers, and others—created a far-reaching sense of a new nation. In the century that followed Mexico’s independence from Spain in 1821, Beezley maintains, sentiments of nationality were promulgated by people who were concerned not with the promotion of nationalism but with something far more immediate—the need to earn a living. These peddlers, vendors, actors, artisans, writers, publishers, and puppeteers sought widespread popular appeal so that they could earn money. According to Beezley, they constantly refined their performances, as well as the symbols and images they employed, in order to secure larger revenues. Gradually they discovered the stories, acts, and products that attracted the largest numbers of paying customers. As Beezley convincingly asserts, out of “what sold to the masses” a collective national identity slowly emerged. Mexican National Identity makes an important contribution to the growing body of literature that explores the influences of popular culture on issues of national identity. By looking at identity as it was fashioned “in the streets,” it opens new avenues for exploring identity formation more generally, not just in Mexico and Latin American countries but in every nation.

Check out the New Books in History Interview with Bill Beezley!

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816526901
Publisher:
University of Arizona Press
Publication date:
05/29/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

William H. Bezley is a professor of history at the University of Arizona. He has published many books, including The Oxford History of Mexico (co-edited with Michael C. Meyer), Latin America: The Peoples and Their History (co-authored with Colin MacLachlan), and Judas at the Jockey Club.

Table of Contents


Preface     vii
Acknowledgments     xiii
How El Negrito Saved Mexico from the French: The Popular Sources of National Identity     3
Tightly Knotted Nodes of Possibility: Almanacs and Loteria     19
Independence Celebrations and Representations of the Nation     53
Itinerant Puppet Theater and National Identity     98
The Plainsong of Nineteenth-Century National Identity     146
El Discurso de Vale Coyote     151
Notes     155
Bibliography     185
Index     203

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >