Mi hija, mi hijo, el aguila, la paloma

Mi hija, mi hijo, el aguila, la paloma

by Ana Castillo, Susan Guevara
     
 
Both a blessing to a child and a tribute to parenthood, this superb keepsake book by renowned Chicana poet and author Ana Castillo was inspired by ancient Aztec chants. It's the ideal gift to commemorate any of various momentous events in an older child's life--such as graduation, an important birthday, a quincea-era, or a family occasion. In words and pictures, the

Overview

Both a blessing to a child and a tribute to parenthood, this superb keepsake book by renowned Chicana poet and author Ana Castillo was inspired by ancient Aztec chants. It's the ideal gift to commemorate any of various momentous events in an older child's life--such as graduation, an important birthday, a quincea-era, or a family occasion. In words and pictures, the book's two sections--one for a daughter and one for a son--trace the milestones of growing up and reflect parental joy and pride in the process. Like an illuminated manuscript in a new-world context, the illustrations by S. Guevara stylistically combine Aztec elements with strong contemporary images on bark. This wholly original creation has a multicultural appeal and a radiance that makes it a book everyone will want to give or receive.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
This awardwinning Chicano writer's touching tribute to the years of adolescence is inspired by ancient Nahuatl chants and radiates devotion, joy, and pride. These modernday canticles, or poems, are addressed in two sections to "my daughter, the dove" and "my son, the eagle, the tiger." Castillo calls on the wisdom of her Aztec ancestors to create her version of the ancient word, offering timehonored messages of loving guidance and advice that is as true and sensible today as it was centuries ago. The importance of honesty, hard work, and high morals were stressed then as now. The author points out that problems, such as drugs and untimely pregnancies, faced teens in early Mexico as well as today. Castillo's compelling word pictures are beautifully complemented by Guevara's vivid panels, which illustrate the growingup process with contemporary portrayals yet allude to postHispanic codices in the use of some of their imaginative glyphs. A butterfly, a name glyph for a daughter, is posed over a girl's head, and a star, the symbol for a son, is poised over a boy's head. This engaging book, presented in the decorative style of medieval illuminated manuscripts, is visually striking and inspiring for its timeless words of counsel. The Spanish version is equally delightful, and bilingual teens will enjoy a double treat comparing the two versions. Author and illustrator notes offer fascinating insights into the customs and symbolism of Mesoamerican cultures. Illus. Author and Illustrator Notes. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; SeniorHigh,defined as grades 10 to 12). 2000, Penguin, Ages 12 to 18, 48p, $12.99. Reviewer: Delia A. Culberson

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525458678
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
03/01/2000
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
7.06(w) x 7.14(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Chato’s Kitchen and Chato and the Party Animals. About Chato’s Kitchen, School Library Journal said, “Guevara’s striking illustrations enrich the text with delightful, witty details.” She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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