Mi pais inventado: Un paseo nostalgico por Chile (My Invented Country: A Nostalgic Journey through Chile)

( 6 )

Overview

El primer recuerdo que Isabel Allende tiene de Chile es el de una casa que nunca conoció: la "casa grande y vieja" de la calle Cueto, donde nació su madre. Esta casa, evocada por su abuelo con tanta frecuencia que Isabel cree haber vivido allí, se convierte en la protagonista de su primera novela, La casa de los espíritus. Dicha obra vuelve a aparecer al comienzo de las fascinantes y seductoras memorias, Mi país inventado, que ahora nos ofrece esta talentosa escritora.

Los ...

See more details below
Paperback (Spanish-language Edition)
$11.46
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$12.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $6.50   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

El primer recuerdo que Isabel Allende tiene de Chile es el de una casa que nunca conoció: la "casa grande y vieja" de la calle Cueto, donde nació su madre. Esta casa, evocada por su abuelo con tanta frecuencia que Isabel cree haber vivido allí, se convierte en la protagonista de su primera novela, La casa de los espíritus. Dicha obra vuelve a aparecer al comienzo de las fascinantes y seductoras memorias, Mi país inventado, que ahora nos ofrece esta talentosa escritora.

Los asiduos lectores de Allende reconocerán inmediatamente a los miembros de esta familia chilena --abuelos, bisabuelos, tías, tíos y amigos--, personajes de carácter mítico que pueblan este magnífico libro. A su vez, es un retrato inolvidable de la idiosincrasia del pueblo chileno, su historia violenta y su espíritu indomable. Aunque Isabel afirma haber sido una extranjera en su propio país --"Nunca encajé en ningún sitio, ni en mi familia, ni en mi clase social ni en la religión que se me confirió"--lleva consigo hasta hoy la marca de la política y la magia de su tierra natal. En Mi país inventado, explora el papel de la memoria y la nostalgia que le ayudaron a dar forma a su vida y a sus libros.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Criticas
Well-loved novelist Allende has always drawn from her personal life and family history in her writing, adding richness and detail to novels like Eva Luna (Rayo, 2001) and Hija de la fortuna (Daughter of Fortune, Rayo, 2002). In this newest work, she once again invites readers into her heart and mind, revealing the seeds of her novels and her impetus to write. Allende's memory guides this leisurely amble through worm holes in her personal history, focusing on her nostalgia for her lost country, Chile. After the 1973 military coup that ended her uncle's presidency and life, Allende went into exile and was forced to create a new homeland in her imagination. This memoir reads like a casual interview in which the acclaimed author explains everything from the history and geography of her native country to how she fell in love with an American in San Francisco. Admittedly subjective and even reveling in her bias when discussing Chilean society, its politics, and the national temperament, Allende is unfalteringly honest and engaging. Diehard fans will be interested in this fireside title, but the book lacks the substance and power of her first memoir, Paula (Rayo, 1996). The poignant storytelling is absent here mainly because Allende has already told this story in other books. Recommended for bookstores and libraries with large Spanish-language collections.
—Salwa C. Jabado, New York City Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Popular novelist Allende considers homeland and exile from the perspective of two events: the assassination of her uncle, Salvador Allende Gossens, and September 11. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060545680
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/3/2004
  • Language: Spanish
  • Edition description: Spanish-language Edition
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 405,932
  • Product dimensions: 8.02 (w) x 10.86 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Isabel Allende is the bestselling author of twelve works of fiction, four memoirs, and three young-adult novels, which have been translated into more than thirty-five languages with sales in excess of fifty-seven million copies. She is the author most recently of the bestsellers Maya's Notebook, Island Beneath the Sea, Inés of My Soul, Portrait in Sepia, and Daughter of Fortune. In 2004 she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She received the Hans Christian Andersen Literary Award in 2012. Born in Peru and raised in Chile, she lives in California.

Biography

In Isabel Allende's books, human beings do not exist merely in the three-dimensional sense. They can exert themselves as memory, as destiny, as spirits without form, as fairy tales. Just as the more mystical elements of Allende's past have shaped her work, so has the hard-bitten reality. Working as a journalist in Chile, Allende was forced to flee the country with her family after her uncle, President Salvador Allende, was killed in a coup in 1973.

Out of letters to family back in Chile came the manuscript that was to become Allende's first novel. Her arrival on the publishing scene in 1985 with The House of the Spirits was instantly recognized as a literary event. The New York Times called it "a unique achievement, both personal witness and possible allegory of the past, present and future of Latin America."

To read a book by Allende is to believe in (or be persuaded of) the power of transcendence, spiritual and otherwise. Her characters are often what she calls "marginal," those who strive to live on the fringes of society. It may be someone like Of Love and Shadows 's Hipolito Ranquileo, who makes his living as a circus clown; or Eva Luna, a poor orphan who is the center of two Allende books (Eva Luna and The Stories of Eva Luna).

Allende's characters have in common an inner fortitude that proves stronger than their adversity, and a sense of lineage that propels them both forward and backward. When you meet a central character in an Allende novel, be prepared to meet a few generations of his or her family. This multigenerational thread drives The House of the Spirits, the tale of the South American Trueba family. Not only did the novel draw Allende critical accolades (with such breathless raves as "spectacular," "astonishing" and "mesmerizing" from major reviewers), it landed her firmly in the magic realist tradition of predecessor (and acknowledged influence) Gabriel García Márquez. Some of its characters also reappeared in the historical novels Portrait in Sepia and Daughter of Fortune.

"It's strange that my work has been classified as magic realism," Allende has said, "because I see my novels as just being realistic literature." Indeed, much of what might be considered "magic" to others is real to Allende, who based the character Clara del Valle in The House of the Spirits on her own reputedly clairvoyant grandmother. And she has drawn as well upon the political violence that visited her life: Of Love and Shadows (1987) centers on a political crime in Chile, and other Allende books allude to the ideological divisions that affected the author so critically.

But all of her other work was "rehearsal," says Allende, for what she considers her most difficult and personal book. Paula is written for Allende's daughter, who died in 1992 after several months in a coma. Like Allende's fiction, it tells Paula's story through that of Allende's own and of her relatives. Allende again departed from fiction in Aphrodite, a book that pays homage to the romantic powers of food (complete with recipes for two such as "Reconciliation Soup"). The book's lighthearted subject matter had to have been a necessity for Allende, who could not write for nearly three years after the draining experience of writing Paula.

Whichever side of reality she is on, Allende's voice is unfailingly romantic and life-affirming, creating mystery even as she uncloaks it. Like a character in Of Love and Shadows, Allende tells "stories of her own invention whose aim [is] to ease suffering and make time pass more quickly," and she succeeds.

Good To Know

Allende has said that the character of Gregory Reeves in The Infinite Plan is based on her husband, Willie Gordon.

Allende begins all of her books on January 8, which she considers lucky because it was the day she began writing a letter to her dying grandfather that later became The House of the Spirits.

She began her career as a journalist, editing the magazine Paula and later contributing to the Venezuelan paper El Nacional.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Unas Palabras Para Comenzar

Nací en medio de la humareda y mortandad de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y la mayor parte de mi juventud transcurrió esperando que el planeta volara en pedazos cuando alguien apretara distraídamente un botón y se dispararan las bombas atómicas. Nadie esperaba vivir muy largo; andábamos apurados tragándonos cada momento antes de que nos sorprendiera el apocalipsis, de modo que no había tiempo para examinar el propio ombligo y tomar notas, como se usa ahora. Además crecí en Santiago de Chile, donde cualquier tendencia natural hacia la autocontemplación es cercenada en capullo. El refrán que define el estilo de vida de esa ciudad es: Camarón que se duerme se to Ileva la corriente. En otras culturas más sofisticadas, como la de Buenos Aires o Nueva York, la visita at psicólogo era una actividad normal; abstenerse se consideraba evidencia de incultura o simpleza mental. En Chile, sin embargo, sólo los locos peligrosos lo hacían, y sólo en una camisa de fuerza; pero eso carnbió en los años setenta, junto con la llegada de la revolución sexual. Tal vez exista una conexión ... En mi familia nadie recurrió jamás a terapia, a pesar de que varios de nosotros éramos clásicos casos de estudio, porque la idea de confiar asuntos íntimos a un desconocido, a quien además se le pagaba para que escuchara, era absurda; para eso estaban los curas y las tías. Tengo poco entrenamiento para la reflexión, pero en las últimas semanas me he sorprendido, pensando en mi pasado con una frecuencia que sólo puede explicarse como signo de senilidad prematura.

Dos sucesos recientes han desencadenado esta epidemia de recuerdos. El primero fue una observación casual de mi nieto Alejandro, quien me sorprendó escrutando el mapa de mis arrugas frente al espejo y dijo compasivo: No te preocupes, vieja, vas a vivir por lo menos tres años más. Decidí entonces que habia llegado la hora de echar otra mirada a mi vida, para averiguar cómo, deseo conducir esos tres años que tan generosamente me han sido adjudicados. El otro acontecimiento fue una pregunta de un desconocido durante una conferencia de escritores de viajes, que me tocó inaugurar. Debo aclarar que no pertenezco a ese extraño grupo de personas que viaja a lugares remotos, sobrevive a la bacteria y luego publica libros para convencer a los incautos de que sigan sus pasos. Viajar es un esfuerzo desproporcionado, y más aún a lugares donde no hay servicio de habitaciones. Mis vacaciones ideales son en una silla bajo un quitasol en mi patio, leyendo libros sobre aventureros viajes que jamás haría a menos que fuera escapando de algo. Vengo del llamado Tercer Mundo (¿cuál es el segundo?) y tuve que atrapar un marido para vivir legalmente en el primero; no tengo intención de regresar al subdesarrollo sin una buena razón. Sin embargo, y muy a pesar mío, he deambulado por cinco continentes y además me ha tocado ser autoexiliada e inmigrante. Algo sé de viajes y por eso me pidieron que hablara en aquella conferencia. Al terminar mi breve discurso, se levantó una mano entre el público y un joven me preguntó qué papel jugaba la nostalgia en mis novelas. Por un momento quedé muda. Nostalgia ... según el diccionario es la pena de verse ausente de la patria, la melancolía provocada por el recuerdo de una dicha perdida. La pregunta me cortó el aire, porque hasta ese instante no me había dado cuenta de que escribo como un ejercicio constante de añoranza. He sido, forastera durante casi toda mi vida, condición que acepto porque no me queda, alternativa. Varias veces me he visto forzada a partir, rompiendo, ataduras y dejando todo atrás, para comenzar de nuevo, en otra parte; he sido, peregrina por más caminos de los que puedo, recordar. De tanto despedirme se me secaron las raíces y debí generar otras que, a falta de un lugar geográfico donde afincarse, lo han hecho en la memoria; pero, ¡cuidado!, la memoria es un laberinto donde acechan minotauros.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Mi Pais Inventado
Un Paseo Nostalgico por Chile

Unas Palabras Para Comenzar

Nací en medio de la humareda y mortandad de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y la mayor parte de mi juventud transcurrió esperando que el planeta volara en pedazos cuando alguien apretara distraídamente un botón y se dispararan las bombas atómicas. Nadie esperaba vivir muy largo; andábamos apurados tragándonos cada momento antes de que nos sorprendiera el apocalipsis, de modo que no había tiempo para examinar el propio ombligo y tomar notas, como se usa ahora. Además crecí en Santiago de Chile, donde cualquier tendencia natural hacia la autocontemplación es cercenada en capullo. El refrán que define el estilo de vida de esa ciudad es: <<Camarón que se duerme se to Ileva la corriente>>. En otras culturas más sofisticadas, como la de Buenos Aires o Nueva York, la visita at psicólogo era una actividad normal; abstenerse se consideraba evidencia de incultura o simpleza mental. En Chile, sin embargo, sólo los locos peligrosos lo hacían, y sólo en una camisa de fuerza; pero eso carnbió en los años setenta, junto con la llegada de la revolución sexual. Tal vez exista una conexión ... En mi familia nadie recurrió jamás a terapia, a pesar de que varios de nosotros éramos clásicos casos de estudio, porque la idea de confiar asuntos íntimos a un desconocido, a quien además se le pagaba para que escuchara, era absurda; para eso estaban los curas y las tías. Tengo poco entrenamiento para la reflexión, pero en las últimas semanas me he sorprendido, pensando en mi pasado con una frecuencia que sólo puede explicarse como signo de senilidad prematura.

Dos sucesos recientes han desencadenado esta epidemia de recuerdos. El primero fue una observación casual de mi nieto Alejandro, quien me sorprendó escrutando el mapa de mis arrugas frente al espejo y dijo compasivo: <<No te preocupes, vieja, vas a vivir por lo menos tres años más>>. Decidí entonces que habia llegado la hora de echar otra mirada a mi vida, para averiguar cómo, deseo conducir esos tres años que tan generosamente me han sido adjudicados. El otro acontecimiento fue una pregunta de un desconocido durante una conferencia de escritores de viajes, que me tocó inaugurar. Debo aclarar que no pertenezco a ese extraño grupo de personas que viaja a lugares remotos, sobrevive a la bacteria y luego publica libros para convencer a los incautos de que sigan sus pasos. Viajar es un esfuerzo desproporcionado, y más aún a lugares donde no hay servicio de habitaciones. Mis vacaciones ideales son en una silla bajo un quitasol en mi patio, leyendo libros sobre aventureros viajes que jamás haría a menos que fuera escapando de algo. Vengo del llamado Tercer Mundo (¿cuál es el segundo?) y tuve que atrapar un marido para vivir legalmente en el primero; no tengo intención de regresar al subdesarrollo sin una buena razón. Sin embargo, y muy a pesar mío, he deambulado por cinco continentes y además me ha tocado ser autoexiliada e inmigrante. Algo sé de viajes y por eso me pidieron que hablara en aquella conferencia. Al terminar mi breve discurso, se levantó una mano entre el público y un joven me preguntó qué papel jugaba la nostalgia en mis novelas. Por un momento quedé muda. Nostalgia ... según el diccionario es <<la pena de verse ausente de la patria, la melancolía provocada por el recuerdo de una dicha perdida>>. La pregunta me cortó el aire, porque hasta ese instante no me había dado cuenta de que escribo como un ejercicio constante de añoranza. He sido, forastera durante casi toda mi vida, condición que acepto porque no me queda, alternativa. Varias veces me he visto forzada a partir, rompiendo, ataduras y dejando todo atrás, para comenzar de nuevo, en otra parte; he sido, peregrina por más caminos de los que puedo, recordar. De tanto despedirme se me secaron las raíces y debí generar otras que, a falta de un lugar geográfico donde afincarse, lo han hecho en la memoria; pero, ¡cuidado!, la memoria es un laberinto donde acechan minotauros.

Mi Pais Inventado
Un Paseo Nostalgico por Chile
. Copyright © by Isabel Allende. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2005

    Nostalgia

    Para aquellos que llegamos como extranjeros y que hemos dejado nuestros países de origen, este libro revive los sentimientos de nostalgia, añoranza y en algunos casos tristeza, pero con un cierto sabor de 'alivio'. Después de haber devorado este libro, los demás títulos de Allende tienen más sentido, e incluso invitan a volver a leerlos teniendo este antecedente de 'quién, porqué y cuándo' de cada uno.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2004

    Es un magnifico libro

    Es un bello relato de el pais que esta talentosa escritora dejo atras en el cual ella habla de las tradiciones , costumbres y comidas de su chile. esta muy bueno .

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2003

    I could relate

    Being a Chilean immigrant woman in Canada, I could completely relate to Isabel Allende's vivid descriptions of everything Chilean in her book, and how it feels to live away from your country. I could not help but smile everytime I recognized myself in those pages, and also the invented country that lives in my own heart. It is very enjoyable read whether you are Chilean or not.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2003

    L. a reader

    I bought this book before boarding a four hours flight. I finished it before landing. Maybe I went too fast but it was so good. Really good! I read it in spanish... I don't know the translation would be...Characterizes chileans in a great way and tries to take a centered stand on her country's recent political turmoil

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)