Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11: How One Film Divided a Nation / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.65
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 77%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $5.65   
  • New (4) from $16.00   
  • Used (6) from $5.65   

Overview


In the heat of the 2004 presidential election campaign, no single work of speechmaking, writing, or media production fueled the fiery debate over George W. Bush's leadership as much as Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. Certainly, no American documentary film ever provoked as much political controversy.

A noted film scholar now offers a much-needed appraisal of both the film and the furor surrounding it. Robert Brent Toplin first examines the development of Moore's ideas and the evolution of his filmmaking, then dissects Fahrenheit 9/11 and explores the many claims and disagreements about the movie's truthfulness. Toplin considers the ways in which Moore based his arguments on a diverse array of "primary sources," many of which had received scant attention in the mainstream media—including the notorious seven-minute "Pet Goat" video depicting President Bush—either deliberately calm or paralyzed—in a Florida classroom on being told of the 9/11 attacks. Finally, Toplin considers the movie's impact, noting that some enthusiasts of the film thought it would help Democrats in the 2004 elections while others argued that Moore's strident approach to issues would turn off swing voters and contribute to a Republican victory.

Critics lambasted Fahrenheit 9/11, claiming Moore violated standards of documentary filmmaking through his excessive partisanship. They also berated him for taking events out of context and getting the facts wrong. Toplin contends that partisanship is a well-established tradition in documentary filmmaking, and he shows that the major disagreements between admirers and detractors of Fahrenheit 9/11 revolved around interpretation rather than the factual record. Michael Moore took some controversial risks, Toplin demonstrates, but on many large and small matters-from his treatment of the Bush administration's reactions to 9/11 and war—making in Iraq to disputes about the Saudi flights from the United States after 9/11—Moore raised many legitimate questions.

Toplin's engaging study shows that Michael Moore's film did more than shake up a nation; it also made an indelible contribution to the esteemed tradition of agenda-driven cinema. Especially in the light of how some of Moore's views have been given added weight by subsequent events, Toplin's book should encourage a new appreciation of Fahrenheit 9/11 and its impact.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Moore's provocative polemic, released early in the election year of 2004, criticized the Bush administration in a number of ways. It broke all records for documentary attendance and revenues, but also drew a blast of hostile attacks, not only, predictably, from right-wing partisans but also from more mainstream critics, who found it distorted or downright untruthful. Acknowledging Moore's deliberate attempt to influence the election against the Republican incumbency, Toplin argues that the negative fallout (not the film itself) led to a voter backlash with the opposite effect. Toplin (who has also written about Oliver Stone, another gadfly) reviews Moore's history, beginning with his attack on General Motors, Roger and Me, and analyzes the personal and humorous approach Moore has employed from the beginning. While clearly on Moore's side and convinced of the fundamental truth of the film's argument-Toplin believes it "made history"-he concedes that some of its points could have been made less controversially. Nevertheless, the "most important message of Fahrenheit 9/11 is that the war with Iraq was unnecessary." Toplin is mostly addressing his political community, but film students may also pick up some valuable information. Photos. (Apr. 20) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780700614523
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas
  • Publication date: 4/28/2006
  • Series: Culture America Ser.
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 168
  • Sales rank: 1,244,076
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Table of Contents


Introduction

1. The Reel Politics of Michael Moore

2. The Anatomy of Fahrenheit 9/11

3. A Sinister Exercise

4. The Partisan Documentary

5. Let the Debate Begin

6. The Impact of Film

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)