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Microbes and Malignancy: Infection as a Cause of Human Cancers
     

Microbes and Malignancy: Infection as a Cause of Human Cancers

by Julie Parsonnet (Editor), Sandra J. Horning (Editor)
 

Historically, the study of infection has focused on acute illnesses and their treatment. Infection, however, is not simply an acute process; microbial agents thrive in the human body throughout life. The unrecognized, intimate relationship we share with microorganisms is a critical factor in longevity and health. In recent years, it has become apparent that some

Overview

Historically, the study of infection has focused on acute illnesses and their treatment. Infection, however, is not simply an acute process; microbial agents thrive in the human body throughout life. The unrecognized, intimate relationship we share with microorganisms is a critical factor in longevity and health. In recent years, it has become apparent that some cancers may be attributable to underlying chronic infection. Fortunately, infectious diseases are often treatable or preventable. Also, the composition of infectious agents is far less complex than that of humans. Thus the link between infection and cancer may offer insight into the pathogenesis and prevention of all cancers. This book, authored by some of the world's leaders in microbiology, virology, biochemistry, and pathology, provides an overview of oncogenic mechanisms imputed to infection. Individual chapters examine the epidemiologic, clinical and molecular links between specific infectious agents and cancer, and address methods of disease prevention. Microbiologists, cancer biologists, pathologists, oncologists, and infectious disease specialists interested in the etiology of malignancy will find this book an indispensable addition to their libraries.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Charles E. Edmiston, Jr., PhD (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Description: This fascinating text lays out the epidemiologic and scientific data supporting a microbial role in the etiology of human neoplasms.
Purpose: The multiauthored book presents a broad and cogent discussion of the current scientific knowledge of both the mechanisms of infection-induced malignancies and the potential role of specific microbial populations (bacteria, viruses, and other parasites) in the epidemiology and etiology of cancer.
Audience: The structure and written style make this book appropriate for a rather broad audience, including microbiologists, healthcare epidemiologists, and other investigators interested in the causal etiologies of cancer.
Features: The text is well organized, citing many specific examples of the potential microbial involvement in the induction of cancer. The role of chronic inflammatory changes and cellular regeneration as premalignant events associated with tissue-based infections is clearly discussed in the first section of the text. The editor has also included an excellent chapter on viral oncogenesis, introducing the reader to viruses currently associated with human neoplasms and agents suspected as playing a role in the development of human cancers. Many of the chapters presented in the text are extremely timely, such the role of H. pylori in gastric adenoma and lymphoma. In addition, two chapters are devoted to Hepatitis B and C virus and evidence that links these agents to hepatocellular carcinoma. Each chapter contains numerous critical references, and where appropriate tables and figures support the textual material.
Assessment: The editor has provided an outstanding if not unique resource that carefully documents the current evidence linking microbial agents to human cancer. The list of internationally recognized contributors makes this an authoritative and valuable resource for any investigator or student interested in this area of research. I highly recommend the acquisition of this text, either as part of one's personal library or as an institutional holding.
3 Stars from Doody
Charles E. Edmiston
This fascinating text lays out the epidemiologic and scientific data supporting a microbial role in the etiology of human neoplasms. The multiauthored book presents a broad and cogent discussion of the current scientific knowledge of both the mechanisms of infection-induced malignancies and the potential role of specific microbial populations (bacteria, viruses, and other parasites) in the epidemiology and etiology of cancer. The structure and written style make this book appropriate for a rather broad audience, including microbiologists, healthcare epidemiologists, and other investigators interested in the causal etiologies of cancer. The text is well organized, citing many specific examples of the potential microbial involvement in the induction of cancer. The role of chronic inflammatory changes and cellular regeneration as premalignant events associated with tissue-based infections is clearly discussed in the first section of the text. The editor has also included an excellent chapter on viral oncogenesis, introducing the reader to viruses currently associated with human neoplasms and agents suspected as playing a role in the development of human cancers. Many of the chapters presented in the text are extremely timely, such the role of H. pylori(/I) in gastric adenoma and lymphoma. In addition, two chapters are devoted to Hepatitis B and C virus and evidence that links these agents to hepatocellular carcinoma. Each chapter contains numerous critical references, and where appropriate tables and figures support the textual material. The editor has provided an outstanding if not unique resource that carefully documents the current evidence linking microbial agents to humancancer. The list of internationally recognized contributors makes this an authoritative and valuable resource for any investigator or student interested in this area of research. I highly recommend the acquisition of this text, either as part of one's personal library or as an institutional holding.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195104011
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

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