Overview

The goal of this book is to provide engineers and researchers the tools necessary for modelling, experimenting, and simulating these microflows as a preliminary step for designing and optimizing fluidic microsystems. The various consequences of miniaturization on the hydrodynamics of gas, liquid or two-phase flows, as well as associated heat transfer are analysed. The book is illustrated with examples showing the diversity and the originality of fluidic microsystems.

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Microfluidics

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Overview

The goal of this book is to provide engineers and researchers the tools necessary for modelling, experimenting, and simulating these microflows as a preliminary step for designing and optimizing fluidic microsystems. The various consequences of miniaturization on the hydrodynamics of gas, liquid or two-phase flows, as well as associated heat transfer are analysed. The book is illustrated with examples showing the diversity and the originality of fluidic microsystems.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118599884
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/6/2013
  • Series: ISTE
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • File size: 8 MB

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Chapter 1. Introduction to Microflows 1
Stéphane COLIN

1.1. Fluid mechanics, fluidics and microfluidics 1

1.2. Scaling effects and microeffects 3

1.3. Original pumping techniques 14

1.4. Microfabrication and flows 18

1.5. Microfluidic applications 20

1.6. Bibliography 21

Chapter 2. Gaseous Microflows 25
Jean-Claude LENGRAND and Tatiana T. ELIZAROVA

2.1. Continuum model and molecular model 25

2.2. Molecular description of a flow 38

2.3 Continuum description of a flow 51

2.4. Physical modeling 59

2.5. Examples of microflows 67

2.6. Bibliography 85

Chapter 3. Liquid Microflows: Particularities and Modeling 89
Christine BARROT and Jean-Pierre DELPLANQUE

3.1. Introduction 89

3.2. Background, liquid microflow physics 90

3.3. Numerical simulation of microflows 101

3.4. Non-mechanical active control of microflows 110

3.5. Conclusions 114

3.6. Bibliography 115

Chapter 4. Physiological Microflows 121
Jacques DUFAUX, Marc DURAND, Gérard GUIFFANT and Kristine JURSKI

4.1. Description of the microvascular network 121

4.2. Blood flow: an unusual means of transportation 130

4.3. Instrumentation 141

4.4. Description of flows and microcirculatory networks 154

4.5. The microcirculatory system: an optimized transport network? 174

4.6. Conclusion 186

4.7. Bibliography 186

Chapter 5. Single-Phase Heat Transfer 195
Sedat TARDU

5.1. Introduction 195

5.2. Heat transfer in channels of conventional sizes 196

5.3. “Macroeffects” in microchannels: single-phase liquid flows 201

5.4. Gas microflows: rarefaction and compressibility 211

5.5. Molecular effects of liquid flows in microchannels 220

5.6. Electrostatic effects: interfacial electrostatic double layer 222

5.7. Conclusion 229

5.8. Acknowledgment 229

5.9. Bibliography 230

Chapter 6. Two-Phase Microflows 235
Olivier LEBAIGUE

6.1. Introduction 235

6.2. Digital versus continuous two-phase microflows 241

6.3. Basic phenomena 244

6.4. Some peculiarities of two-phase flows in microchannels 277

6.5. Bibliography 294

Chapter 7. Experimental Methods 303
Lucien BALDAS and Robert CAEN

7.1. Introduction 303

7.2. Measurements at the microscale: general overview 303

7.3. Pressure measurements 304

7.4. Flow rate measurements 309

7.5. Temperature measurements 326

7.6. Velocity measurements 328

7.7. Conclusion 340

7.8. Acknowledgments 340

7.9. Bibliography 340

Chapter 8. Fluidic Microsystems 349
Isabelle DUFOUR and Olivier FRANÇAIS

8.1. Introduction 349

8.2. Basic modules 349

8.3. Examples of developments around microsystems 365

8.4. Conclusion 382

8.5. Bibliography 382

Chapter 9. Microsystems in Macroflows Active Control 389
Sedat TARDU

9.1. Introduction 389

9.2. Notions of active control 390

9.3. Microsensors 395

9.4. Microprobes in the flow 421

9.5. Actuators 422

9.6. Conclusion 424

9.7. Bibliography 424

List of Authors 433

Index 435

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