The Microscope: An Introduction to Microscopic Methods and to Histology (Classic Reprint)

The Microscope: An Introduction to Microscopic Methods and to Histology (Classic Reprint)

by Simon Henry Gage
     
 

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Excerpt from The Microscope: An Introduction to Microscopic Methods and to Histology

In revising and rewriting this book now for the twelfth time, the aim has been as for all previous editions, to give the student the benefit of the fundamental things which have been worked out in microscopy. The opportunities given by the freedom from teaching have rendered it

Overview

Excerpt from The Microscope: An Introduction to Microscopic Methods and to Histology

In revising and rewriting this book now for the twelfth time, the aim has been as for all previous editions, to give the student the benefit of the fundamental things which have been worked out in microscopy. The opportunities given by the freedom from teaching have rendered it possible to make this revision more thorough than could be done in any previous edition.

Progress in all that pertains to microscopy has been marked during the last ten years. Any one can see this clearly by comparing the catalogues of manufacturers sent out ten years ago with those sent out at the present time.

Nothing fundamentally new has appeared, but there have been great advances in making practical and usable many processes and much apparatus for which the basic knowledge has existed for a considerable time. Of course there are some, principles and manipulations which a person must become master of if he is to work successfully with the microscope. These have been treated mainly as in the past. Of the new things nothing has been considered in the book which has not been personally tested and found to be workable and helpful.

Among the most important means recently made available, especially for students of biology, are the following:

(1) The single objective binocular for all powers of the microscope from the lowest to the highest.

(2) The dark-field illuminator for all powers, especially the highest powers with which the finest details in living structures can be seen with marvelous clearness. This makes it possible to compare the living cell with the fixed and stained one.

(3) The perfection of apparatus with which the powerful electric lights recently produced have become available for demonstrations and for drawing with the projection microscope.

(4) The perfection of photographic light filters and the production of dry plates sensitive to the whole spectrum makes it possible to get good photographs of any microscopic specimen, and indeed of any specimen.

(5) From the numbers who are affected, and the extent of its application, perhaps the greatest improvement of all has been the production of a glass filter which, when used with a gas filled mazda lamp, gives a light of true daylight quality and of sufficient intensity for all powers of the microscope.

In preparing this edition some parts of the previous edition have been omitted.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781331965190
Publisher:
FB &c Ltd
Publication date:
07/22/2015
Pages:
490
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.99(d)

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