Microsoft Access 2003 Forms, Reports, and Queries (Business Solutions Series)

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Overview

When it comes to job-productivity, we all want to be able to perform well, especially when it comes to challenging assignments. Anyone who works with Microsoft Access on a regular basis knows that this program can prove to be one of the most challenging. If you are looking for a way to get the most you can out of the primary Access tasks, Microsoft Access 2003 Forms, Reports and Queries is the learning tool that you need. Focusing only on the forms, reports and queries functions, this book provides you with ...

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Overview

When it comes to job-productivity, we all want to be able to perform well, especially when it comes to challenging assignments. Anyone who works with Microsoft Access on a regular basis knows that this program can prove to be one of the most challenging. If you are looking for a way to get the most you can out of the primary Access tasks, Microsoft Access 2003 Forms, Reports and Queries is the learning tool that you need. Focusing only on the forms, reports and queries functions, this book provides you with practical know-how, real-world examples and techniques that you can put to use immediately. Learn to condense mountains of information into manageable molehills of useful knowledge, so that you can perform at your best!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789731524
  • Publisher: Que
  • Publication date: 8/18/2004
  • Series: Business Solutions Series
  • Pages: 370
  • Product dimensions: 7.38 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul McFedries is the president of Logophilia Limited, a technical writing company. Now primarily a writer, Paul has worked as a programmer, consultant, spreadsheet developer and website developer. He has written more than 40 books that have sold nearly three million opies worldwide. These books include Formulas and Functions for Excel (Que, 2004), The Absolute Beginner's Guide to VBA (Que, 2004) and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Windows XP (Alpha, 2001).

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

What's in the Book.

This Book's Special Features.

I. CREATING POWERFUL QUERIES

1. Creating a Basic Query.

Sorting Records.

Sorting on a Single Field.

Sorting on Multiple Fields.

Filtering Table Data.

Filtering by Selection.

Filter Excluding Selection.

Filtering By Form.

Learning About Filter Criteria.

Creating a Filter.

Working with Queries.

Creating a Query.

Creating a New Query Object.

Selecting the Fields to Include in the Query.

Entering the Query Criteria.

Excluding a Field from the Query Results.

Selecting Only the Top N Values.

Setting Field Properties.

Running the Query.

Querying Notes for Business Users.

Querying for a Mail Merge.

Creating Queries with the Query Wizards.

Creating Crosstab Queries

Creating Find Duplicates Queries.

Creating Find Unmatched Queries.

Working with a Query Dynaset.

Understanding the Datasheet View.

Navigating Fields.

Entering Data.

Adding More Records.

Navigating Records.

Selecting a Record.

Copying a Record.

Deleting a Record.

Formatting the Datasheet.

Working with Query Properties.

From Here.

2. Building Criteria Expressions.

Using Operands in Criteria Expressions.

Literals.

Identifiers.

Functions.

Using Operators in Criteria Expressions.

Comparison Operators.

Arithmetic Operators.

The Like Operator.

The Between...And Operator.

The In Operator.

The Is Null Operator.

Compound Criteria and the Logical Operators.

Using the Logical Operators.

Understanding Operator Precedence.

Setting Up a Calculated Column.

Calculating Inventory Value.

Calculating Discounted Invoice Totals.

Using the Built-In Functions.

Using Text Functions.

Using Date and Time Functions.

Using Math Functions.

Using Financial Functions.

Working with the Expression Builder.

From Here.

3. Working with Multiple-Table Queries.

Relational Database Fundamentals.

The Pitfalls of a Nonrelational Design.

How a Relational Design Can Help.

Step 1: Separate the Data.

Step 2: Add Foreign Keys to the Tables.

Step 3: Establish a Link Between the Related Tables.

Types of Relational Models.

The One-To-Many Model.

The One-to-One Model.

The Many-to-Many Model.

Enforcing Referential Integrity.

Establishing Table Relationships.

Understanding Join Lines.

Types of Joins.

Adding Tables to the Relationships Window.

Joining Tables.

Editing a Relationship.

Removing a Join.

Working with Multiple Tables in a Query.

Adding Multiple Tables to a Query.

Adding Fields from Multiple Tables.

Nesting Queries Within Queries.

Joining Tables Within the Query Design Window.

Creating Other Types of Joins.

Creating Outer Joins.

Creating Self-Joins.

Creating Theta Joins.

Creating a Unique Values Query.

Drilling Down to the Order Details.

From Here.

4. Creating Advanced Queries.

Creating a Totals Query.

Displaying the Total Row in the Design Grid.

Setting Up a Totals Query On a Single Field.

Setting Up a Totals Query On Multiple Fields.

Filtering the Records Before Calculating Totals.

Creating a Totals Query for Groups of Records.

Grouping on Multiple Fields.

Creating a Totals Query Using a Calculated Field.

Creating a Totals Query Using Aggregate Functions.

Combining Aggregate Functions and Totals.

Creating Queries That Make Decisions.

Making Decisions with the IIf Function.

Making Decisions with the Switch Function.

Calculating a Customer Discount Rate.

Running Parameter Queries.

Creating a Simple Query Parameter.

Specifying the Parameter Data Type.

Running Action Queries.

Modifying Table Data with an Update Query.

Removing Records from a Table with a Delete Query.

Creating New Tables with Make-Table Queries.

Adding Records to a Table with an Append Query.

From Here.

5. Creating PivotTable Queries.

What Is a PivotTable?.

How PivotTables Work.

Some PivotTable Terms.

Creating a One-Dimensional PivotTable.

Display Data Field Details.

Displaying the Sum of the Data Field Values.

Hiding and Showing the Data Details.

Inserting an AutoCalc Data Field Summary Calculation.

Changing the AutoCalc Calculation Type.

Creating a Calculated Field.

Removing a PivotTable Field.

Creating a Multiple-Field One-Dimensional PivotTable.

Creating a Two-Dimensional PivotTable.

Analyzing Customer Orders by Product Category.

Adding a Temporal Dimension to the PivotTable.

Filtering a PivotTable.

Using the PivotTable AutoFilters.

Displaying Only the Top or Bottom Items.

Grouping Field Items.

Adding a Filter Field.

Pivoting a PivotTable.

Moving a Field to a Different Area.

Changing the Field Order.

Formatting a PivotTable.

From Here.

6. Querying with SQL Statements.

Viewing the SQL Statement.

Using SQL to Perform a Select Query.

Understanding the SELECT Statement.

Using SQL with Multiple-Table Queries.

Adding a Calculated Column to the SELECT Statement.

Using SQL to Total and Group Records.

Using SQL to Set Up a Parameter Query.

The Full SQL SELECT Syntax.

Using SQL to Perform Action Queries.

Using SQL to Perform an Update Query.

Using SQL to Perform a Delete Query.

Using SQL to Perform a Make-Table Query.

Using SQL to Perform an Append Query.

Using SQL to Create Subqueries.

Using a Subquery to Define a Field.

Determining Whether a Unit Price Is Greater Than the Average.

Using a Subquery to Define Criteria for a Field.

Using Subqueries That Return Dynasets.

In Predicate: Customers Who Have Placed Orders.

All Predicate: Products Cheaper Than All the Condiments.

Using SQL to Create Union Queries.

From Here.

II. CREATING FORMS

7. Creating and Using a Form.

Creating a Form with AutoForm.

Running AutoForm Directly on a Table or Query.

Running the AutoForm Wizard.

Creating Simple Forms with the Form Wizard.

Navigation in a Form.

Creating a Form in Design View.

Displaying the Design View.

A Tour of the Design View Window.

Understanding Form Controls.

Adding Fields to the Form.

Changing the Size of the Form.

Viewing the Form.

Assigning an AutoFormat in Design View.

Working with the Form Header and Footer.

Working with Form Properties.

Formatting the Background.

Protecting the Form and Data from Other Users.

From Here.

8. Working with Form Controls.

Manipulating Form Controls.

Inserting Controls on a Form.

Selecting Controls.

Formatting Controls.

Adding Conditional Formatting.

Sizing Controls.

Moving Controls.

Copying Controls.

Deleting Controls.

Grouping Controls.

Ordering Overlapped Controls.

Converting an Unbound Control to a Bound Control.

Changing a Control's Type.

Setting the Tab Order.

Adding Labels to the Form.

Inserting a Label.

Editing the Label Caption.

Using Labels to Create Keyboard Shortcuts for Controls.

Adding Text Boxes to the Form.

Inserting a Text Box.

Using Text Boxes As Calculated Controls.

Creating a Mortgage Calculator.

From Here.

9. Designing Forms for Efficient and Accurate Data Entry.

Preventing Errors by Validating Data.

Helping Users with Text Prompts.

Preventing Errors with Data Validation Expressions.

Using Input Masks for Consistent and Accurate Data Entry.

Using Controls to Limit Data-Entry Choices.

Working with Yes/No Fields.

Using Option Buttons to Present a Limited Number of Choices.

Using an Option Group to Select the Shipper

Using Lists to Present a Large Number of Choices.

Data Entry with ActiveX Controls.

Entering Numbers Using a Spin Button.

Entering Numbers Using a Scrollbar.

Entering Dates Using a Calendar.

From Here.

10. Designing Forms for Business Use.

Using Forms in a Business Context.

Why Collect the Data?.

What Is the Data?.

Who Are Your Users?.

Ten Design Guidelines for Business Forms.

1. Make Forms Fast.

2. Make Forms Foolproof.

3. Mimic Paper Forms When Practical.

4. Give Users What They Need, and Then Stop.

5. Don't Neglect the Keyboard.

6. Watch the Field Order (and the Tab Order, Too).

7. Watch Your Screen Resolution and Colors.

8. Make Form Text Readable.

9. Go Easy on the Extras.

10. Organize Your Form Controls.

Organizing Controls on the Form.

Making Good Use of Lines and Rectangles.

Organizing with Option Groups.

Organizing with a Tab Control.

Enhancing Form Text.

Formatting Text.

Text Formatting Tips and Guidelines.

Fancier Form Formatting.

Working with Colors.

Adding Images to Your Forms.

Adding Special Effects.

Create a Shadow Effect for Text.

From Here.

11. Creating Specialized Forms.

Creating a Multiple-Table Form.

Understanding Subforms.

Creating a Form and Subform with the Form Wizard.

Creating a Subform in the Form Design View.

Working with Form Command Buttons.

Creating a Switchboard Form.

Creating a Form Pop-Up Box or Dialog Box.

Creating a Pop-Up Form.

Creating a Modal Form.

Using a Custom Form with a Parameter Query.

Creating the Custom Form.

Adjusting the Parameter Query.

Using the Custom Form and Parameter Query.

Creating a Startup Form.

Creating a PivotChart Form.

From Here.

III. DESIGNING AND CUSTOMIZING

12. Creating and Publishing a Report.

Creating a Report with AutoReport.

Running AutoReport Directly on a Table or Query.

Running the AutoReport Wizard.

Creating Simple Reports with the Report Wizard.

Creating a Report in Design View.

Displaying the Design View.

The Architecture of Access Reports.

Understanding Report Controls.

Adding Fields to the Report.

Adding Labels to the Report.

Adding Page Numbers to the Report.

Adding the Date and Time to the Report.

Changing the Size of a Report Section.

Previewing the Report.

Assigning an AutoFormat in Design View.

Working with Report Properties.

Formatting the Background.

Manipulating Report Controls.

Publishing a Report.

Publishing on Paper.

Publishing to Email.

Exporting to Another Format.

Publishing to Word or Excel.

From Here.

13. Designing Effective Business Reports.

Using Reports in Business.

What's In the Report?.

What Is the Goal of the Report?.

Who Are Your Readers?.

Ten Design Guidelines for Business Reports.

1. Copy Legacy Reports When Practical.

2. Give Users What They Need, Then Stop: Part 1.

3. Give Users What They Need, Then Stop: Part 2.

4. Use Page Numbers.

5. Use Dates and Times.

6. Watch the Field Order.

7. Watch Your Screen Resolution and Colors.

8. Make Report Text Readable.

9. Always Sort and/or Group Data.

10. Organize the Report Layout.

Organizing Controls on the Report.

Making Good Use of Lines and Rectangles.

Creating Page Breaks.

Enhancing Report Text.

Formatting Text.

Text Formatting Tips and Guidelines.

Fancier Report Formatting.

Working with Colors.

Adding Images to Your Reports.

Adding Special Effects.

Create a Shadow Effect for Text.

From Here.

14. Designing Advanced Reports.

Sorting and Grouping a Report.

Setting Up Sorting Options.

Setting Up Grouping Options.

Sorting and Grouping Using an Expression.

Adding Calculations to a Report.

Inserting a Text Box.

Using Text Boxes As Calculated Controls.

Creating a Invoice Report.

Advanced Methods for Launching a Report.

Launching a Report with a Command Button.

Launching a Report with a Macro.

Controlling Report Output.

Adding Page Breaks After Sections.

Starting Sections at the Top of a Row or Column.

Avoiding Widowed Records.

From Here.

15. Creating Specialized Reports.

Creating a Multiple-Column Report.

Setting Up the Report.

Tweaking the Page Setup.

Troubleshooting Multiple Columns.

Using Multiple Columns to Reduce Report Page Count.

Creating Mailing Labels.

Running the Label Wizard.

Creating a Custom Label.

Creating a Mail Merge Report.

Creating a Multiple-Table Report.

Understanding Subreports.

Creating a Report and Subreport with the Report Wizard.

Creating a Subreport in the Report Design View.

Creating a PivotChart Report.

From Here.

Index

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2004

    learn SQL

    McFedries has essentially produced a first course on SQL, using Microsoft Access as the user interface into a relational database. There are sections of the book about fairly simple UI controls and their usages. Like how to change fonts or colours. Mundane stuff. But the book goes much deeper. It shows how Access can teach you much about many relational database topics. Table relationships, referential integrity, multiple table queries, table joins and so on. En route, the author gently introduces examples of SQL queries. The full syntax of which is complex enough to deter many new users. But by seeing the queries used in many simple contexts should help your retention. So the book serves two purposes. The first is to learn Access. The second is to learn SQL and relational databases, using Access just as a means to an end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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