Microsoft Access 2010 Inside Out [NOOK Book]

Overview

You're beyond the basics, so dive right in and really put your database skills to work! This supremely organized reference is packed with hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and workarounds. It's all muscle and no fluff. Discover how the experts tackle Access 2010 -- and challenge yourself to new levels of mastery!

  • Master essential data management and design techniques
  • Import and link to ...
See more details below
Microsoft Access 2010 Inside Out

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Overview

You're beyond the basics, so dive right in and really put your database skills to work! This supremely organized reference is packed with hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and workarounds. It's all muscle and no fluff. Discover how the experts tackle Access 2010 -- and challenge yourself to new levels of mastery!

  • Master essential data management and design techniques
  • Import and link to data from spreadsheets, databases, text files, and other sources
  • Use action queries to quickly insert, update, or delete entire sets of data
  • Create custom forms to capture and display data
  • Design reports to calculate, summarize, and highlight critical data--and learn advanced techniques
  • Automate your application with macros and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA)
  • Use Access Services to extend your database application to the Web
  • Try out the sample client and web database applications in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions
A Note Regarding the CD or DVD

The print version of this book ships with a CD or DVD. The sample client and web database applications are provided in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. Note that while we provide as much of the media content as we are able via free download, we are sometimes limited by licensing restrictions.

For customers who purchase an ebook version of this title, instructions for downloading the CD files can be found in the ebook.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735652316
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 8/29/2010
  • Series: Microsoft Inside Out Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 1500
  • Sales rank: 735,564
  • File size: 58 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Jeff Conrad, best known as the “Access Junkie,” is a Software Design Engineer in Test for the Access team at Microsoft. Jeff is the author of Microsoft Access 2010 Inside Out and co-author of Microsoft Office Access 2007 Inside Out. He was also a Microsoft MVP from 2005 through 2007 before joining the Access test team. Jeff maintains a website with a wealth of information and resource links for those needing guidance with Access. Visit http://www.AccessJunkie.com.

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Table of Contents

; Acknowledgments; About the CD; What’s on the CD; Sample Applications; System Requirements; Support Information; Conventions and Features Used in This Book; Text Conventions; Design Conventions; Syntax Conventions; Introduction; Getting Familiar with Access 2010; About This Book; Understanding Access; Chapter 1: What Is Access?; 1.1 What Is a Database?; 1.2 Access as an RDBMS; 1.3 Access as an Application Development System; 1.4 Deciding to Move to Database Software; 1.5 Extending the Power of Access to the Web; Chapter 2: Exploring the Access 2010 Interface; 2.1 Opening Access for the First Time; 2.2 Getting Started with Access 2010; 2.3 Understanding Content Security; 2.4 Understanding the Office Fluent Ribbon; 2.5 Understanding the Navigation Pane; 2.6 Using the Single-Document vs. the Multiple-Document Interface; 2.7 Modifying Global Settings via the Access Options Dialog Box; Chapter 3: Access 2010 Overview; 3.1 The Architecture of Access; 3.2 Exploring a Desktop Database—Housing Reservations; 3.3 What Happened to Project Files (ADP)?; 3.4 The Many Faces of Access; Creating a Database and Tables; Chapter 4: Designing Client Tables; 4.1 Creating a New Database; 4.2 Creating Your First Simple Table by Entering Data; 4.3 Creating a Table Using Application Parts; 4.4 Creating a Table Using Data Type Parts; 4.5 Creating a Table in Design View; 4.6 Defining Fields; 4.7 Defining a Primary Key; 4.8 Defining a Table Validation Rule; 4.9 Understanding Other Table Properties; 4.10 Defining Relationships; 4.11 Adding Indexes; 4.12 Setting Table Design Options; 4.13 Creating a Default Template for New Databases; 4.14 Printing a Table Definition; 4.15 Database Limitations; Chapter 5: Modifying Your Table Design; 5.1 Before You Get Started; 5.2 Deleting Tables; 5.3 Renaming Tables; 5.4 Changing Field Names; 5.5 Moving Fields; 5.6 Inserting Fields; 5.7 Copying Fields; 5.8 Deleting Fields; 5.9 Changing Data Attributes; 5.10 Reversing Changes; 5.11 Using the Table Analyzer Wizard; 5.12 Taking a Look at Lookup Properties; 5.13 Working with Multi-Value Lookup Fields; 5.14 Changing the Primary Key; 5.15 Compacting Your Database; Chapter 6: Designing Web Tables; 6.1 Working with the Web; 6.2 Creating a New Web Database; 6.3 Creating Your First Simple Web Table by Entering Data; 6.4 Creating a Web Table Using Application Parts; 6.5 Using Data Type Parts; 6.6 Creating Web Tables in Datasheet View; 6.7 Defining a Table Validation Rule for Web Databases; 6.8 Defining a Primary Key for Web Databases; 6.9 Understanding Other Web Table Properties; 6.10 Creating Lookup Fields in a Web Database; 6.11 Creating Relationships Using Lookup Fields; 6.12 Using the Web Compatibility Checker; Chapter 7: Creating Table Data Macros; 7.1 Uses of Data Macros; 7.2 The Data Macro Design Facility—An Overview; 7.3 Working with Before Events; 7.4 Working with After Events; 7.5 Working with Named Data Macros; 7.6 Debugging Data Macros; 7.7 Understanding Recursion in Data Macros; 7.8 Sharing Data Macro Logic; Chapter 8: Importing and Linking Data; 8.1 A Word About Open Database Connectivity (ODBC); 8.2 Creating a Data Source to Link to an ODBC Database; 8.3 Importing vs. Linking Database Files; 8.4 Importing Data and Databases; 8.5 Importing Spreadsheet Data; 8.6 Importing Text Files; 8.7 Modifying Imported Tables; 8.8 Linking Files; 8.9 Collecting Data via Email; 8.10 Importing and Linking SharePoint Data; 8.11 Saving Import Procedures; Building Queries; Chapter 9: Creating and Working with Simple Queries; 9.1 Selecting Data from a Single Table; 9.2 Testing Validation Rule Changes; 9.3 Working in Query Datasheet View; Chapter 10: Building Complex Queries; 10.1 Selecting Data from Multiple Tables; 10.2 Using a Query Wizard; 10.3 Summarizing Information with Totals Queries; 10.4 Using Query Parameters; 10.5 Customizing Query Properties; 10.6 Editing and Creating Queries in SQL View; 10.7 Limitations on Using Select Queries to Update Data; 10.8 Creating PivotTables and PivotCharts from Queries; 10.9 Creating Queries for the Web; Chapter 11: Modifying Data with Action Queries; 11.1 Updating Groups of Rows; 11.2 Creating a New Table with a Make-Table Query; 11.3 Inserting Data from Another Table; 11.4 Deleting Groups of Rows; 11.5 Troubleshooting Action Queries; Creating Forms; Chapter 12: Using Forms in an Access Application; 12.1 Uses of Forms; 12.2 A Tour of Forms; 12.3 Understanding Web Form Limitations; 12.4 Moving Around on Forms and Working with Data; 12.5 Adding Records and Changing Data; 12.6 Searching for and SSSSSSorting Data; 12.7 Printing Forms; Chapter 13: Building a Form; 13.1 Forms and Object-Oriented Programming; 13.2 Starting from Scratch—A Simple Input Form; 13.3 Working with Quick Create and the Form Wizard; 13.4 Simplifying Data Input with a Form; 13.5 Working with Application Part Forms; Chapter 14: Customizing a Form; 14.1 Aligning and Sizing Controls in Design View; 14.2 Enhancing the Look of a Form; 14.3 Setting Control Properties for Client Forms; 14.4 Setting Client Form Properties; 14.5 Setting Client Form and Control Defaults; 14.6 Working with Web Forms in Layout View; 14.7 Starting from Scratch—A Simple Input Web Form; 14.8 Setting Control Properties for Web Forms; 14.9 Setting Web Form Properties; 14.10 Using Themes; 14.11 Working with Shared Resources; Chapter 15: Advanced Form Design; 15.1 Basing a Form on a Multiple-Table Query; 15.2 Creating and Embedding Subforms; 15.3 Displaying Values in an Option Group; 15.4 Using Conditional Formatting in Client Forms; 15.5 Working with the Tab Control; 15.6 Creating Multiple-Page Client Forms; 15.7 Working with Client PivotChart Forms; 15.8 Working with Navigation Controls; 15.9 Using Web Browser Controls; Working with Reports; Chapter 16: Using Reports; 16.1 Uses of Reports; 16.2 A Tour of Reports; 16.3 Printing Reports; Chapter 17: Constructing a Report; 17.1 Starting from Scratch—A Simple Report; 17.2 Using the Report Command; 17.3 Using the Report Wizard; 17.4 Working with Web Reports in Layout View; 17.5 Building a Web Report in Layout View; 17.6 Understanding Web Report Limitations; Chapter 18: Advanced Report Design; 18.1 Building a Query for a Complex Report; 18.2 Creating the Basic Facility Occupancy By Date Report; 18.3 Defining the Grouping and Sorting Criteria; 18.4 Setting Section and Report Properties; 18.5 Using Calculated Values; 18.6 Creating and Embedding a Subreport; 18.7 Adding a PivotChart to a Client Report; Automating an Access Application Using Macros; Chapter 19: Understanding Event Processing; 19.1 Access as a Windows Event-Driven Application; 19.2 Summary of Form and Report Events; 19.3 Understanding Event Sequence and Form Editing; Chapter 20: Automating a Client Application Using Macros; 20.1 Uses of Macros; 20.2 The Macro Design Facility—An Overview; 20.3 Defining Multiple Actions; 20.4 Working with Submacros; 20.5 Understanding Conditional Expressions; 20.6 Using Embedded Macros; 20.7 Using Temporary Variables; 20.8 Trapping Errors in Macros; 20.9 Understanding Macro Actions That Are Not Trusted; 20.10 Making Your Application Come Alive with Macros; Chapter 21: Automating a Web Application Using Macros; 21.1 Creating Web Macros; 21.2 Using Macro Objects for Common Functionality; 21.3 Working with Web Form and Control Events; 21.4 Passing Parameters to Forms and Reports; 21.5 Exploring the Invoice Audit Web Form Macros; 21.6 Checking SharePoint User Permission Group Levels; 21.7 Performing Different Actions When Opening a Web Form in a Browser; 21.8 Avoiding Type Coercion Issues; Working with the Web; Chapter 22: Using Web Applications in a Browser; 22.1 Working with SharePoint; 22.2 Publishing Your Database to an Access Services Site; 22.3 Working with Your Application in a Web Browser; 22.4 Exploring the Access Services Shell; 22.5 Working with the Recycle Bin; 22.6 Extending Your Access Services Application; 22.7 Using Your Published Web Database in Access; 22.8 Instantiating an Access Services Template; Chapter 23: Using Business Connectivity Services; 23.1 Understanding Web Services; 23.2 Introducing Business Connectivity Services; 23.3 Using XML; 23.4 Working with BDC Model Definition Files; 23.5 Generating Entities; 23.6 Connecting Data Services in Access; Installing Your Software; Installing the Office System; Converting from a Previous Version of Access; Installing the Office 64-Bit Version; Installing the Sample Files; About the Authors;

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