Microsoft Excel Version 2002 Plain and Simple

Microsoft Excel Version 2002 Plain and Simple

by Curtis Frye D., The Epic Software Group, Epic Software Group
     
 

Get the fast facts that make learning Excel 2002 plain and simple!

HERE’S WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  • Find the simplest ways to get stuff done in Microsoft® Excel
  • Customize your spreadsheet: format, formulas, functions
    • Add charts, graphics, and PivotTables® to bring data alive
  • Embed a spreadsheet into a

…  See more details below

Overview

Get the fast facts that make learning Excel 2002 plain and simple!

HERE’S WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  • Find the simplest ways to get stuff done in Microsoft® Excel
  • Customize your spreadsheet: format, formulas, functions
    • Add charts, graphics, and PivotTables® to bring data alive
  • Embed a spreadsheet into a Web page
  • Use Excel with other Microsoft Office programs

HERE’S HOW YOU’LL LEARN IT:

  • NUMBERED STEPS show exactly what to do
  • Color SCREEN SHOTS keep you on track
  • Handy TIPS teach easy techniques and shortcuts
  • Quick TRY THIS! exercises put your learning to work
  • CAUTION notes help keep you out of trouble

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735614512
Publisher:
Microsoft Press
Publication date:
11/28/2001
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
9.14(w) x 7.42(h) x 0.61(d)

Read an Excerpt

  • Displaying Data Graphically
    • Identify Chart Elements
  • Creating a Chart Using the Chart Wizard
    • Build a Chart Using a Wizard
  • Changing a Chart's Appearance
    • Change a Chart Type
    • Change the Formatting of a Chart Element
  • Formatting Chart Legends and Titles
    • Show or Hide a Chart Legend
    • Add Titles
    • Add or Remove Data Labels
    • Add Chart Annotations
  • Changing the Body of a Chart
    • Show or Hide Chart Gridlines
    • Change the Scale on the Value (Y) Axis
    • Change the Scale on the Category (X) Axis
  • Customizing Chart Data
    • Change the Source Data for Your Chart
    • Add a New Series
    • Delete a Series
  • Working with Common Charts
    • Pull out a Slice of a Pie Chart
    • Explode a Pie Chart
    • Change the Way You View 3-D Charts
  • Working with Uncommon Charts
    • Create a Stock Chart
  • Performing a "What If" Analysis
    • Add a Trendline to a Data Series

    10  Using Charts to Display Data

    In this section

    • Displaying Data Graphically
    • Creating a Chart Using the Chart Wizard
    • Changing a Chart's Appearance
    • Formatting Chart Legends and Titles
    • Changing the Body of a Chart
    • Customizing Chart Data
    • Working with Common Charts
    • Working with Uncommon Charts
    • Performing a "What If" Analysis

    Excel gives you many ways to display your numeric data. You can change the color or font of data you want to emphasize, make labels bold to set them apart from the body of data in your worksheets, or add graphics to establish your corporate identity. You can use totals and subtotals to summarize your data, making it easier for you and your colleagues to compare values for entire categories of data.

    One excellent way to present data—particularly large amounts of it—is by using charts. For example, when you present sales data to colleagues or potential investors who are less familiar with your business, you can use charts and graphs to visually summarize the information. By presenting your data this way, you will make it much easier to identify patterns and relationships at a glance.

    In this section, you will learn how to:

    • Create a chart using the Chart Wizard.
    • Change a chart's type.
    • Add or modify legends, titles, and annotations.
    • Change a chart's scale.
    • Customize a pie chart.
    • Project future trends based on chart data.

    Displaying Data Graphically

    When you enter data into a Microsoft Excel worksheet, you can create a record of important information, whether they are individual sales, sales for an hour of a day, or the price of a product. What a list of values in cells can't easily communicate, however, are the overall trends in your data. A good way to communicate trends in large data collections is through charts and graphs, which summarize data visually.

    As an example of how charts and graphs can help present your data more effectively, consider the selected cells in the following graphic, which list the sales at a garden supply store for the hour from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. in January 2002.

    (Image unavailable)

    In a sense, the data does speak for itself. The total sales for each hourly period are listed so that you and your colleagues can compare them. However, each number must be comprehended, remembered, and compared to the other results individually. When you present the results in a chart or a graph, as is done with the following column chart, you can compare the values more readily.

    (Image unavailable)

    If you have trouble deciding which type of chart or graph to create, you can experiment while you build a chart with the Chart Wizard. The Chart Wizard explains what types of data each chart type represents most effectively. Experiment with different chart types to find one that works best with your data.

    Standard Excel Chart Types and Uses

    Chart TypeUse
    ColumnCompares data in a vertical format.
    BarCompares data in a horizontal format.
    LineCompares data in a line format.
    PieCompares the data in a percent format.
    Scatter PlotCompares pairs of values in a dot format.
    AreaCompares the trend of values over time or across categories.
    DoughnutCompares multiple series of data in a percent format.
    RadarDisplays changes in values relative to a center point.
    SurfaceDisplays trends in values across two dimensions.
    BubbleCompares sets of three values.
    StockDisplays a chart for comparison of stock prices and quotes.
    CylinderSame as a column or bar chart, but uses a cylindrical format.
    ConeSame as a column or bar chart, but uses a conical format.
    PyramidSame as a column or bar chart, but uses a pyramid format.

    Identify Chart Elements

    The following graphic identifies the chart elements you'll set when you create your chart. You can modify any of these elements by double-clicking them and using the controls in the dialog box that appears.

    Chart title

    Chart area

    Value (Y) Axis

    Grid line

    Value axis title

    Legend

    Category (X) Axis

    Category axis title

    (Image unavailable)

    Creating a Chart Using the Chart Wizard

    To present your Excel data graphically, select the cells you want to summarize and run the Chart Wizard. The cells with the data to be represented in the chart are part of one or more data series. A series is a collection of related data, such as all sales for a particular product or the sales for a day of the month. A bar chart could contain just one series; a line chart, which might display monthly sales for several years, could have many series. The Chart Wizard steps you through the process of creating a chart, letting you select the type of chart you want to create, set the chart's appearance, and decide whether you want to place the chart in an existing sheet or in a new sheet. As with all Excel wizards, you can step back through the wizard to change any of your choices before you finalize the chart.

    Build a Chart Using a Wizard

    1. Select the cells you want to chart.
    2. Click the Chart Wizard button.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Click the chart type you want.
    5. Click the chart subtype you want, and click Next.
    6. (Image unavailable)


      TIP:
      To select the appropriate chart type for your data, take advantage of the preview feature by clicking the Press And Hold To View Sample button on the first page of the Chart Wizard. This feature allows you to see how your data will actually appear in each chart format.

    7. Click the Series tab.
    8. (Image unavailable)

    9. Click a series.
    10. Type the name you want for the series, and click Next.
    11. (Image unavailable)

    12. Click the Titles, Axes, Gridlines, Legend, Data Labels, and Data Table tabs, and specify the options you want. Click Next.
    13. Select where you want to place the chart, and click Finish.
    14. (Image unavailable)


    SEE ALSO:
    For more information about changing the name of the new sheet you can create along with a new chart, see "Renaming a Sheet" on page 49.

    Changing a Chart's Appearance

    Once you've created a chart, you can change any part of its appearance, including the chart type! If you display monthly sales data as a series of columns and decide you'd rather show the data as a line rising and falling as it moves from month to month, it's simple to do so. You can also change the color, font, and other properties of any chart element. If you want your chart's title to be displayed in your company's official font, you can format the title easily.

    Change a Chart Type

    1. Click the chart you want to change.
    2. Choose Chart Type from the Chart menu.
    3. (Image unavailable)

      (Image unavailable)

    4. Click the type of chart you want.
    5. Click the chart subtype you want.
    6. Click OK.

    Change the Formatting of a Chart Element

    1. Double-click the chart element you want to change.
    2. Click the Patterns, Font, and Alignment tabs, and select the formatting you want.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Click OK.

    Formatting Chart Legends and Titles

    An important part of creating an informative, easily read chart is to describe the contents of the chart with text. Some chart elements you can add to clarify your Excel charts are legends, titles, data labels, and annotations. A legend is a list of the categories in a chart and the color used to represent each one. For example, in a sales chart comparing monthly sales for several years, you might display the first year in yellow, the second year in blue, and the third year in red. The legend identifies those relationships so that you can read the chart easily and accurately. Titles and data labels describe specific parts of a chart. Annotations provide further information about the data the chart displays.

    Show or Hide a Chart Legend

    1. Click the chart you want to format.
    2. Click the Legend button on the Chart toolbar.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    Add Titles

    1. Right-click the chart area of the chart you want to add a title to, and choose Chart Options from the shortcut menu.
    2. Click the Titles tab.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Type the titles you want.
    5. Click OK.

    Add or Remove Data Labels

    1. Right-click the area of the chart you want to change, and choose Chart Options from the shortcut menu.
    2. Click the Data Labels tab.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Select or clear the labels you want to show or hide.
    5. Click OK.

    Add Chart Annotations

    (Image unavailable)

    1. Click the chart you want to add annotations to.
    2. Type the text you want, and press Enter.
    3. Drag the annotations to the location you want.

    Changing the Body of a Chart

    When you add labels, a legend, or annotations to a chart, you change the periphery of the chart but you don't affect how the data is displayed. If you do want to change how the data is displayed in the body of the chart, such as by showing or hiding gridlines or by changing the scale of the chart, you can do so. Adding gridlines can help viewers make fine distinctions between values, even if they're viewing the chart from the other end of a conference table. Changing the scale of a chart lets you highlight or downplay the differences among the chart's values.

    Show or Hide Chart Gridlines

    1. Right-click the area of the chart you want to change, and choose Chart Options from the shortcut menu.
    2. Click the Gridlines tab.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Select or clear the gridlines you want to show or hide.
    5. Click OK.

    Change the Scale on the Value (Y) Axis

    1. Double-click the Value (Y) axis.
    2. Click the Scale tab.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Type the value you want for the scale.
    5. Click OK.

    Change the Scale on the Category (X) Axis

    1. Double-click the Category (X) axis.
    2. Click the Scale tab.
    3. (Image unavailable)

    4. Type how often you want the tick-mark labels to appear.
    5. Type how often you want the tick-marks to appear.
    6. Click OK.

    7. TRY THIS:
      Type scale in the Ask A Question box, and then press Enter. Click Change A Chart Category Axis from the list of help topics that appears to display the available help files for changing the category axis. The help files will show you how to change the number of categories between tick marks on the category axis, change where the value and category axes intersect, set display properties for multiple-level data, and change the category axis label.

    Customizing Chart Data

    When you create a chart for a business, there's always the possibility the data displayed in the chart will change. Whether those changes reflect continuing sales, updated values accounting for returns and inventory charges, or investment projections revised to match market conditions, you can update your chart by identifying a new data source. The data can be in any workbook on your computer or network—all you need to do is identify the cells with the data and Excel will do the rest.

    Change the Source Data for Your Chart

    1. Right-click the area of the chart you want to change, and choose Source Data from the shortcut menu.
    2. Click the Data Range tab.
    3. Click the Collapse Dialog button.
    4. (Image unavailable)

    5. Select the cells you want as the new source data.
    6. Click the Expand Dialog button.
    7. (Image unavailable)

    8. Click OK in the Source Data dialog box.

    Add a New Series

    1. Click the chart you want to change.
    2. Choose Add Data from the Chart menu.
    3. Click the Collapse Dialog button.
    4. (Image unavailable)

    5. Select the cells you want to add.
    6. Click the Expand Dialog button.
    7. (Image unavailable)

    8. Click OK.

    9. TIP:
      If the data you want to display on your chart is on the same sheet as the chart, you can add the data to the chart. Select the cells with the data, hover the mouse pointer over an edge of the group until the mouse pointer changes to a four-headed arrow. Drag the cells onto the chart.

    Delete a Series

    (Image unavailable)

    1. Select the series you want to delete.
    2. Press the Delete key.

    3. TIP
      If you create a chart containing more than one data series, you can change the order in which the series appear on your chart by right-clicking any series, choosing Format Data Series from the shortcut menu, clicking the Series Order tab, and using the controls in the top section of the dialog box to reorder the series.

    Working with Common Charts

    One chart type you might use frequently is the pie chart, which displays the contribution of a series of values to the total of those values. Each section represents a category of data, such as a month in a year or a category of product. You can emphasize part of the data by pulling one section of the pie away from the rest of the chart, or you can pull all of the pieces away from the chart by exploding it. You can also change how you look at a 3-D chart, rotating the chart to change the perspective.

    Pull out a Slice of a Pie Chart

    1. Click the data of the pie chart you want to change.
    2. (Image unavailable)

    3. Click the piece of data you want to pull out.
    4. Drag the piece away from the pie.

    Explode a Pie Chart

    (Image unavailable)

    1. Drag the data of the pie chart away from the pie.

    2. TIP
      If you want to remove the explosion effect from a pie chart, move any exploded piece of the pie toward the center of the chart.

    Change the Way You View 3-D Charts

    1. Right-click the chart you want to change and choose 3-D View from the shortcut menu.
    2. Type the elevation you want.
    3. Type the rotation you want.
    4. Select the additional 3-D options you want.
    5. (Image unavailable)

    6. Click OK.

    7. TIP:
      You can preview the way your chart will look before you finalize it. Instead of clicking OK to accept your changes, click Apply to preview the changes without closing the dialog box.

    Working with Uncommon Charts

    When you think about the types of charts or graphs available to present your data, the first few that come to mind will probably be the pie chart, line graph, and bar chart. Those chart types are used most often because of their familiarity and their straightforward presentation of the relationships between elements of a data series. However, there are other types of charts available to you, among them, the stock chart, which you can use to present stock market data.

    Create a Stock Chart

    1. Select the stock data you want to chart. Be sure the data is formatted as shown in the figure.
    2. Click the Chart Wizard button.
    3. (Image unavailable)

      (Image unavailable)

    4. Click the Titles, Axes, Gridlines, Legend, Data Labels, and Data Table tabs, and specify the criteria you want. Click Next.
    5. (Image unavailable)

    6. Click Stock, and click Next twice.
    7. (Image unavailable)

    8. Click where you want to place the chart, and click Finish.

    Performing a "What If" Analysis

    You can use the data in your Excel workbooks to analyze past performance, but you can also have Excel make its best guess as to future performance if current trends continue. For example, if you create a chart that represents your company's sales for the past five years, you can have Excel analyze the data and add a trendline to the chart to represent how much sales would increase if the current trend holds true for the next year.

    Add a Trendline to a Data Series

    1. Right-click the data series that you want to add a trendline to, and choose Add Trendline from the shortcut menu.
    2. Click the type of trendline you want.
    3. Click the Options tab.
    4. (Image unavailable)

    5. Select the Custom option.
    6. Type the name you want for the trendline.
    7. (Image unavailable)

    8. Type how far into the future you want to project your trendline.
    9. Click OK.

    10. CAUTION:
      Be sure to choose a linear regression analysis; the other types of analyses might not give you accurate results!

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Meet the Author

Curtis Frye is the author of numerous books on Excel and other Office products, most recently the Excel 2007 Pocket Guide. He graduated from Syracuse in 1990 with a degree in political science, and then moved to Washington, DC, where he worked as a defense trade analyst for four years and as the director of sales and marketing for an ISP for one year. He moved to Portland, Oregon, in 1995 to launch his freelance writing career. When Curt's not writing, and often while he is writing, he is a keynote speaker, mentalist, and professional improvisational comedian.

Epic software group, inc.

For the past eleven years, the artists, animators, and programmers at the Epic software group, inc., have been helping their clients use the power of the computer to tell their stories in ways that are not possible with traditional media. Epic creates applications such as multimedia presentations, electronic catalogs, computer-based training, interactive brochures, and touch screen kiosks. Their work is distributed on CD-ROM, disk, and the Internet.

In 1997, the Epic software group entered the world of publishing when the company was chosen to create over one hundred 3-D illustrations for the “Happy and Max” series of children’s books. In 2000, Epic authored Macromedia Flash 5 – From Concept to Creation, followed by Macromedia Director Game Development – From Concept to Creation. Book projects currently in the works by the Epic software group are titles on Flash 6, Director Shockwave 8.5, and LightWave 3D.

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