Microsoft Exchange 2000, Conferencing Server, and SharePoint Portal Server 2001

Microsoft Exchange 2000, Conferencing Server, and SharePoint Portal Server 2001

5.0 1
by Rand Morimoto, Joe Pennetta
     
 

This book covers the planning, design, implementation, and support of Microsoft Exchange 2000, Conference Server 2000, and SharePoint Portal Server that make up Microsoft's knowledge management and collaborative solutions technology suite of products. Built from real world implementations and best practices, the book covers preparing, planning, prototype

Overview

This book covers the planning, design, implementation, and support of Microsoft Exchange 2000, Conference Server 2000, and SharePoint Portal Server that make up Microsoft's knowledge management and collaborative solutions technology suite of products. Built from real world implementations and best practices, the book covers preparing, planning, prototype testing, and implementation of the three products for small, medium, and large organizations. The book also covers how to migrate from Exchange v5.5 to Exchange 2000 as well as has sections on Digital Dashboards, Outlook Web Access messaging, video conferencing, data conferencing, document routing, and information indexing.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672321795
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
07/25/2001
Pages:
594
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.18(h) x 1.42(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Business Solutions Based on Exchange 2000

Microsoft Exchange 2000 is one of the most popular messaging systems in the marketplace. It is best known as an electronic messaging system for intra-office electronic messaging and calendaring, as well as for inbound/outbound Internet e-mail communications. As Microsoft's fifth-generation messaging system, Exchange 2000 does more than just send and receive e-mail messages and provide individual and group calendaring. This chapter reviews the business solutions for which organizations are using Microsoft Exchange 2000, and how the technologies built into Exchange, both old and new, are leveraged to get the most productivity from the system.

What Is Microsoft Exchange 2000?

For most organizations that have deployed the Microsoft Exchange product, it starts off being a basic electronic messaging and calendaring mechanism similar to most other e-mail and scheduling solutions on the market. However, Exchange 2000 extends far beyond just the basics into a truly enterprise-based communications system.

When looking at the core electronic communication requirements of organizations, the basic functions of email and calendaring stand out as the mission-critical applications used to facilitate communications. The following sections look at the various business uses of Exchange 2000, starting with the basics.

Basic Exchange Electronic Messaging

The following are basic electronic messaging functions standard with the Exchange 2000 product.

Microsoft Outlook Client Functionality
Exchange 2000 uses the Outlook client, shown in Figure 1.1, as the front-end to support message creation, look-up, access, and filtering. An Exchange user takes advantage of the Outlook software for the function of message editing such as changing fonts, adding color, and setting boldface or underlining attributes. The mailbox user can also create a personal as well as shared group folder structure so that messages can be dragged and dropped into a logical organizational structure.

Sending and Receiving Internal Messages
The processing of messages within an Exchange 2000 environment is handled by the server function of Exchange. When a user sends a message from the Outlook client, it is received by the Exchange server that queries DNS and the Active Directory to determine whether the user is internal or external to the organization. If the user is internal to the organization, the message is routed to the internal user's mailbox and the message appears in the user's Outlook client software.

Support for SMTP Inbound/Outbound Internet Mail
When a message is destined for a location outside of the organization, Exchange 2000 routes the message to the external message recipient. Exchange 2000 uses the standard SMTP Internet messaging protocol for common message transport to foreign messaging systems.

Basic Exchange Calendaring

Microsoft Exchange also has integrated personal and group calendaring that can be accessed from the Outlook client software. Some of the core calendaring features include the following.

Personal Appointment Book
Each Microsoft Exchange user has a personal appointment book in which his or her schedule is stored, similar to the calendar shown in Figure 1.2. Appointments are stored with time, date, duration, subject, and details of the scheduled appointment. Appointments can be flagged as Private so that when an individual shares his appointment calendar with others, certain appointments are blocked from detailed view by others. An individual's calendar can be viewed or Printed with daily, weekly, or monthly views by default to provide flexibility in seeing calendar events.

Viewing Other's Schedules
Appointment schedules can be shared with others with full details (except private appointments) as well as limited to only seeing free/busy times. A full detailed view allows another user to see all appointments in a calendar (with the exception of private appointments). This gives users in an Exchange organization the ability to open, view, and schedule appointments with others.

Creating Shared Group Calendars
Calendars can be created in Exchange public folders, thus creating a shared calendar structure for shared resources such as conference rooms, company vehicles, shared projectors, and the like. Through security functions, shared calendars can be set where some users can view the calendar, some users can add information to the calendar, and other users have full control over all aspects of the calendar.

Features in Exchange 2000 That Are Similar to Previous Releases

If you are familiar with the Exchange 5.5 product, the following are features that are similar in the Exchange 2000 product.

Client/Server Environment

Exchange 2000 remains a client/server environment in which the server component handles mail message storage, message routing, common forms storage, and resource administration. The client component handles the user interface aspects of Exchange, which include message creation, message deletion, and sorting and filtering of information. The division of tasks between the client and the server systems provide an infrastructure that distributes core business functions to multiple resources. Through proper design and optimization (covered in Chapter 3, "Planning and Designing an Exchange 2000 Environment," and Chapter 9, "Supporting and Managing Exchange 2000"), all of the subcomponents of Exchange 2000 can be tuned to improve overall system performance and operation.

Access via Outlook (32-bit) or Web Client

With Exchange 2000, there are two main methods of access to Exchange data. One method is through the Microsoft Outlook client that comes with the various versions of the Microsoft Office product (Outlook 97, Outlook 98, Outlook 2000, or Outlook XP) shown earlier in this chapter. The other method is through a Web-based client access using the Outlook Web Access client, shown in Figure 1.3. The standard 32-bit Outlook client was the primary method of messaging content access in previous versions of Exchange. However, with significant improvements to the Outlook Web Access client, many organizations are choosing to use the Web interface as the primary method of Exchange access. This method of Exchange access is effective for many specific user access requirements....

Meet the Author

Rand Morimoto has been in the computer industry for more than 20 years and, as a Premier level member of the National Speaker Association (NSA), is world renowned for public speaking and authoring books on networking and communication technologies. Rand is an author for Sams Publishing and McGraw-Hill Publishing with a number of top selling books on information technologies. He frequently travels around the world speaking at conferences and conventions and is an advisor to the White House, setting domestic policy on electronic commerce and communications.

Chris Doyle has more than 10 years of industry experience and has helped clients deploy directory and messaging solutions all over the world. Chris is an author and public speaker who holds a bachelor's degree in English and many industry certifications from vendors such as Microsoft, Cisco, and Compaq. Most importantly, he is a dedicated and loving father and husband.

For the past 10 years, Joe Pennetta has been helping organizations with the planning, design, and deployment of a variety of infrastructure implementations, including enterprise messaging, directory architecture, and disaster recovery strategies. Joe is an author and holds many industry certifications from vendors such as Microsoft, Novell, and Sun Microsystems.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Microsoft Exchange 2000, Conferencing Server, and SharePoint Portal Server 2001 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I used this book as our guide to plan and migrate our organization from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2000 and found this book to be clear, concise, and extremely helpful in our migration process. I highly recommend it!