Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5: Planning, Design and Implementation

Overview

Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5: Planning, Design and Implementation describes the best practices used during the planning, design, and implementation phases of projects to deploy Microsoft Exchange Server. It incorporates the author's general expertise gained from 16 years working with corporate messaging systems as well as experience gained from enterprise-level projects around the world, including Digital's own deployment of 55,000 Exchange clients across 160 servers. The new functionality of Exchange V5.5 is ...

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Overview

Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5: Planning, Design and Implementation describes the best practices used during the planning, design, and implementation phases of projects to deploy Microsoft Exchange Server. It incorporates the author's general expertise gained from 16 years working with corporate messaging systems as well as experience gained from enterprise-level projects around the world, including Digital's own deployment of 55,000 Exchange clients across 160 servers. The new functionality of Exchange V5.5 is covered, but the real values lies in the pragmatic and practical attitude taken to solving the problems posed by large-scale implementations of any messaging system.

This book shows system designers, implementation teams, and e-mail administrators what Exchange V5.5 is capable of and where it needs human assistance to succeed.

Covers Exchange 5.5 SP1 and advanced security and message journaling
Describes best practice used during the planning, design and implementation phases of deploying Microsoft Exchange Server
Foreword by Elaine K. Sharp, Worldwide Messaging Server Product Manager, Microsoft Corporation, March 1992 to October 1996

Audience: Exchange Server system administrators and planners.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'I give it a strong thumbs up. Every Exchange manager should grab a copy of this. The best thing about it is that Tony Redmond has done lots and lots of Exchange installations, so the book (or at least the parts I read) is packed with realistic and 'from the trenches' advice...Tony Redmond has a lot of experience and it shows in this book.' - Network World, Inc.
Booknews
Focusing on large-scale implementations, 16-year messaging veteran Redmond describes the best practices used during the planning, design, and implementation phases of projects to deploy Microsoft Exchange Server. He shows system designers, implementation teams, and e-mail administrators what Exchange V5.5 is capable of and provides practical solutions to the problems posed by large-scale implementations of any messaging system. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781555582135
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 7/17/1998
  • Series: HP Technologies Series
  • Pages: 808
  • Product dimensions: 7.02 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 1.63 (d)

Meet the Author

Tony Redmond is the Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of HP Services, the largest consulting company for enterprise-scale deployments of Microsoft technology in the world. He is one of the world’s leading authorities on Exchange Server. In his position at HP, Tony works alongside many skilled professionals who work with Fortune 1000 companies to plan, deploy, and manage technology integration to achieve business success and so lay the foundation for the best practice explained in his books. Tony writes regularly in Windows IT Pro magazine (www.windowsitpro.com) and has written ten other books for Digital Press.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 7: Connecting Exchange

7.1.1 Options to connect sites

As the name implies, site connectors are used to send messages between one Exchange site and another within a single organization. In fact, four different connectors can be used to link sites together:

  • Direct site connector (also called the site connector)
  • X.400 connector
  • Internet Mail Service (called the Internet Mail Connector in Exchange V4.0, and often shortened to the IMC or IMS)
  • Dynamic Remote Access Server (RAS) connector

Direct site connectors operate through Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs) between the connected servers. This is the preferred connection in a LAN environment or when a permanent high-speed connection exists between two sites. The dynamic connector depends on Windows NT Remote Access Server and it is used when a dial-up connection is made between two sites to send mail to each other. The connection between small branch offices where a single server is located for a small group of users and a larger central department is a good example of the type of situation where a RAS connector might be used. Naturally you'll need to ensure that RAS is configured on the servers involved in the transactions, and provide telephone lines and modems to make the physical connections.

In addition to standard asynchronous connections made over the telephone RAS can also be used over X.25 links. X.25 is a little more complex because you have to install an X.25 card and software in the computers that will talk together.

Apart from the options available to connect sites together, Exchange servers are able to send messages to each other over X.400 and Internet connectors,even when the systems are in the same Exchange organization. Conceptually the primary function for X.400 and Internet connectors can be viewed as to exchange messages with non-Exchange mail systems. In reality these connectors are going to get far more use in linking Exchange servers together. They are also a useful fall-back option for situations where it may be more convenient to piggy-back onto an existing corporate messaging infrastructure than to establish one especially for Exchange. For example, if an SMTP messaging backbone is already operational and used to tie together all the different systems used within an enterprise, the best course of action might be to use the Internet Mail Service to send messages across the SMTP backbone instead of site connectors.

7.1.2 Connecting other mail systems

Reaching outside the organization, the major external connectors provided with the enterprise edition of Exchange are:

  • Microsoft Mail
  • X.400
  • Internet
  • Lotus cc:Mail (available from Exchange V5.0)
  • Lotus Notes (from Exchange V5.5)
  • IBM PROFS (from Exchange V5.5)
  • IBM SNADS (from Exchange V5.5)

The Microsoft Mail connector facilitates backwards connectivity with the Microsoft messaging system replaced by Exchange. This is important not only because the installed base of Microsoft Mail systems are a rich vein of opportunity for the initial deployments of Exchange, but also because the migration period from one messaging system to another often covers quite a long time, especially in larger organizations. The Microsoft Mail connector also allows installations to continue using Microsoft Mail gateways to other mail systems that they may have previously installed.

This connector is very important to Microsoft because it answers an immediate problem for the many thousands of Microsoft Mail installations - "how can I connect to Exchange". The answer is, of course, "Easily - through the Microsoft Mail connector". Thus, this connector is an intensely strategic weapon in the battle to get installations migrated to Exchange. There are other routes-you could certainly use either X.400 or SMTP to link Exchange to Microsoft Mail, but it just wouldn't be as straightforward, seamless, or easy, all arguments that carry enormous weight with system administrators.

We've already discussed how the X.400 and SMTP connectors can be used to connect sites in an Exchange organization together. Now we see them in a different light, facing externally rather than the purely internal view taken so far. The X.400 and SMTP connectors are very important to the overall success of the Exchange program, but in a different way to the Microsoft Mail connector. Unlike Microsoft Mail, whose development was totally under the control of Microsoft, X.400 and SMTP offer the promise of openness in the electronic messaging world, and most international or large-scale organizations will use one or the other, or even both methods to tie different organizational units or sites together. Without easy and out-of-the-box connectivity to X.400 and SMTP Exchange would face a much harder struggle for general acceptance in corporate environments. Equipped with the ability to connect over both X.400 and SMTP Exchange is in a much stronger position, if only because of the fact that many other messaging systems require you to purchase additional components or gateways before they can connect in a similar manner.

While SMTP and X.400 now represent the generally accepted methods for widespread electronic mail, this hasn't always been the case. Corporations have been deploying electronic mail since the start of the 1980s, and there's an often-bewildering array of systems in operation today. Whereas many of the older systems might be tagged with the "legacy" label and they might be scheduled for replacement by a newer system like Exchange in the long term a connectivity need still exists. A set of add-on connectors are therefore available and must be purchased and installed separately.

The Lotus cc:Mail connector first appeared with Exchange V5.0. This connector is a strategic weapon in the war of hearts and minds waged between Microsoft and Lotus. The aim is simple. If Lotus cc:Mail users find it easier to move to Exchange than Lotus Notes (the preferred option for IBM/Lotus) then that's what they'll do. "Easier" means easy to connect, more functionality, and ease of migration. The latter point is addressed by the cc:Mail migration tools provided with Exchange, and now the cc:Mail connector comes along to bridge the remaining gaps.

The Lotus cc:Mail connector works in roughly the same way as the Microsoft Mail connector. In other words, the connection to Exchange seems to be just another cc:Mail post office within the cc:Mail network. So good so far, but this isn't the real value to cc: Mail users. That value is delivered by the ability of Exchange to act as an SMTP or X.400 server for cc:Mail users. Remember that messages introduced into an Exchange organization by any connector can be routed by Exchange to any other connector, so messages sent by cc:Mail users can be routed by Exchange out to Internet (via the Internet Mail Service) or X.400 addressees (via the X.400 connector), or indeed to FAX, PROFS, or any other messaging service connected to Exchange. This functionality is certainly something that could be delivered by connecting cc:Mail to a Lotus Notes environment, but it's harder to configure and certainly doesn't work automatically, without a great deal of configuration. To me, this is the biggest win for cc:Mail users and it will be interesting to see if they agree, and a lot of cc:Mail installations migrate to Exchange. Microsoft certainly hopes so....

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Table of Contents

Introducing Microsoft Exchange Server
• Exchange Clients
• Establishing the Infrastructure for Exchange
• Selecting Hardware for Exchange
• The Joy of Managing Exchange
• Managing Exchange Users
• Connecting Exchange
• The Microsoft Exchange Directory Service
• Conducting a Pilot for Exchange
• Migrating from Other Messaging Systems
• Keeping Your Exchange Server Healthy
• The Exchange Event Service
• Bringing It All Together

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