Microsoft FrontPage Version 2002 Inside Out

Microsoft FrontPage Version 2002 Inside Out

by Jim Buyens
     
 

Conquer FrontPage-from the Inside Out! Hey, you know your way around FrontPager-so now dig into Version 2002 and really put the Web to work! This supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format-it's all muscle and no fluff. Discover the best and fastest ways to perform

Overview

Conquer FrontPage-from the Inside Out! Hey, you know your way around FrontPager-so now dig into Version 2002 and really put the Web to work! This supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format-it's all muscle and no fluff. Discover the best and fastest ways to perform everyday tasks, and challenge yourself to new levels of FrontPage mastery!

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Provides tips and techniques for using the FrontPage 2002 visual web page editor to create web pages and manage the cross-related files that comprise a web site. Intended for more experienced computer users, the advanced guide covers cascading style sheets, hyperlinks, animation, and incorporating forms and databases. The CD-ROM contains add-ins, utilities, and the sample web site used in the book. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735612846
Publisher:
Microsoft Press
Publication date:
05/28/2001
Series:
Microsoft Inside Out Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
1264
Product dimensions:
9.04(w) x 7.36(h) x 2.15(d)
Age Range:
13 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 35.|Using SharePoint Team Web Sites

  • Creating a New SharePoint Team Web Site
  • Using Document Libraries
    • Using Web Discussions
  • Using Subscriptions
  • Using Discussion Boards
  • Using Lists
  • Creating New Libraries, Discussions, and Lists
  • Creating a New Survey
  • Administering SharePoint Team Web Site Settings
  • Creating Custom List Pages
    • Creating and Modifying Library View Pages
    • Creating and Modifying List View Pages
    • Creating and Modifying List Forms
  • In Summary…


Chapter 35 Using SharePoint Team Web Sites

If you install SharePoint Team Services on your Web server, workgroups throughout your organization can use SharePoint team Web sites to coordinate their work. Team Web sites help people work together by providing an easy-to-use repository of project documents, discussions, and lists of virtually anything the project needs to record.

Lists are central to the operation of a SharePoint team Web site. Physically, a list is just a database table. But the power of lists comes from the fact that you can create them, update them, display them, and if necessary delete them using standard Web pages that team members can quickly learn to use.

SharePoint team Web sites provide the following services to anyone with a Web browser, connectivity to your server, and the necessary permissions:

  • Document Libraries. A SharePoint team Web site document library has two components: a folder full of documents and a list that describes them. You can search fordocuments using either the document content itself or the data in the list:
    • Web Discussions. After an Office 2000 or Office XP user saves a document to a Web server as HTML (and recall: this is an integrated, one-step process), Web visitors browsing that document can make comments using a discussion toolbar. SharePoint Team Services stores these comments separately from the document itself. Then, when the document creator opens the document, all the comments appear seamlessly merged.
    • Search page. This feature uses Microsoft Indexing Service to search for documents within the current SharePoint team Web site.

    The clients for these features are either a browser (for the Web-based tasks) or standard Office applications (for document creation and retrieval).

  • Discussion Boards. This is the sort of feature most people call a threaded discussion group. Within a team Web site, you can create as many Discussion Boards as you like, and each board can accommodate an almost unlimited number of threads and messages. You can sort and present the messages any way you like, and purge old messages automatically.
  • Lists. These are the basic unit of storage in a SharePoint team Web site. They can contain a list of announcements, a list of upcoming events, a list of scheduled tasks, a list of team members or contacts, a list of excuses, or anything else you like. The number of lists and the fields they contain are totally at your discretion.
  • Subscriptions. With this feature, team members can ask to be notified whenever a specified document or folder changes. SharePoint Team Services detects such changes and sends the notifications by e-mail.
  • Administration. This Web-based tool provides control over the preceding applications.

Creating a New SharePoint Team Web Site

SharePoint Team Services runs on Microsoft Windows 2000 computers with Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) 5.0 installed. SharePoint Team Services is a server-based application, so installing it requires Administrator privileges on the target machine. At a high level, here are the tasks required:

  1. Install Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, or any laterversion.

  2. NOTE:
    Although Windows 2000 Professional will run SharePoint Team Services, Microsoft intends this as a development platform. Windows 2000 Professional isn’t licensed for use as a widely accessible Web server.

  3. Install IIS.
  4. For more information about installing IIS, refer to Chapter 37, "Installing and Configuring a Web Server."

  5. Install SharePoint Team Services by running \sharept\setupse.exe from your Office XP CD, or by downloading it from Microsoft’s Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/servers and following the accompanying instructions.

As always, it’s generally best to upgrade Windows 2000 and IIS to the latest release or service pack, and to install the most up-to-date release of SharePoint Team Services.For information about using SharePoint Team Services on other operating systems, monitor Microsoft’s Web site.

Installing SharePoint Team Services installs the following items:

  • SharePoint team Web site application components. These include Web pages, ASP pages, ActiveX controls, and so forth.
  • Microsoft FrontPage Server Extensions 2002. If the Web server already contains an earlier version of the extensions, installing SharePoint Team Services will upgrade them.
  • Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE). This is essentially a version of Microsoft SQL Server, but it lacks the tools you need to design and manage your own databases. If you already have a copy of SQL Server running on your network, SharePoint Team Services can use that installation rather than MSDE.

Installing SharePoint Team Services also installs a SharePoint team Web site in the Web server’s root folder. If the server already contains a home page, the Setup program will prompt you before replacing it with the SharePoint team Web site’s home page. If you choose not to replace the existing home page, Setup saves the SharePoint team Web site’s home page using a different name.

If your computer has only one virtual Web server, installing SharePoint Team Services adds the FrontPage Server Extensions and other SharePoint Team Services features to that server automatically. Otherwise, SharePoint Team Services Setup asks you which servers to extend. After you install SharePoint Team Services, you can install it on or remove it at will from any virtual server on the same system.

For more information about installing and removing the FrontPage Server extensions on individual virtual servers, refer to Chapter 38, "Understanding the FrontPage Server Extensions."

Microsoft designed SharePoint team Web sites for use by as many as 500 to 600 people who work together as a group (such as a department or project). The optimal number of users is smaller. If you have a lot of people, you probably have a lot of departments or projects, and you should generally create a separate SharePoint team Web site for each one. Fortunately, a single Web server can host any number of SharePoint team Web sites.

For more information about creating SharePoint team Web sites, refer to "Creating a SharePoint Team Web Site" on page 248.

Figure 35-1 on the next page illustrates the home page for a typical SharePoint team Web site located in the Web server’s root folder. Additional team Web sites on the same server would, of course, have folder paths in their URLs:

  • The menu bar at the top of the page provides access to all features in the site.
  • The Quick Launch area at the left provides hyperlinks to whatever high-usage features you select.
  • The Search Documents text box and accompanying Go button search all documents libraries for a given string of text.
  • The Announcements and Events areas provide links to the Announcements and Events lists and display recent additions to those lists.
  • The Links area provides hyperlinks that team members might frequently use. This data resides in a list called, logically enough, Links.
  • Figure 35-1. The home page for a SharePoint team Web site is highly configurable, but this version is fairly typical for a new site.  (Image Unavailable)

In general, it’s best to block anonymous access to SharePoint team Web sites. Otherwise, the Web server won’t prompt team members for usernames and passwords, and none of the data in the team Web site will be identified by team member.

For more information about controlling access to SharePoint team Web sites, refer to "Administering SharePoint Team Web Site Settings" later in this chapter.

Using Document Libraries

Click Documents on the SharePoint team Web site menu bar to display the Document Libraries page shown in Figure 35-2. This page displays an icon representing each document library in the current team Web site. The one library shown in the figure—Shared Documents—appears automatically in every new team Web site, but you can create as many document libraries as you want. The New Document Library link jumps to a New page that creates new libraries, as do various other links located conveniently throughout the team Web site.

Figure 35-2. This page provides a selection list of SharePoint team Web site document libraries. The one library shown here appears by default in every new team Web site. (Image Unavailable)


How Document Libraries Work

SharePoint team Web site document libraries have three major components:

  • A folder named Shared Documents, where all the documents reside.
  • A database table—stored in MSDE—that records additional information about each document in the library.
  • A series of Web pages that update the document library, perform queries against it, and so forth.

Adding a document to the library requires updating two of these components inunison: the Shared Documents folder and the database table. That’s why you should always update team Web site document libraries through the Web pages provided, or directly from Office XP using Web Folders (or, on Windows 2000, an HTTP location in My Network Places).


Click the icon for any library, or click the Shared Documents link, to display a Document Library View page like the one in Figure 35-3. This page lists the documents in the library.

Figure 35-3. Click a library name or icon in a Document Libraries page (Figure 35-2), or click the Shared Documents link, to display a list of documents like this. (Image Unavailable)

Here are its notable features:

  • Main Document Area. This is the large area with a white background that appears in the center of the Web page. It lists all the documents in the current library. To sort this listing on any field, click the field’s column heading. (That is, click File Name, Last Modified, or Modified By.)
  • Select A View. This area in the top left corner selects among all available formats for listing documents in the library. By default, there are two such formats:
    • All Documents. Displays one line of text for each document in the library. Figure 35-3 illustrates this format.
    • Folder View. Displays one icon for each file or folder in the library. The icons appear from left to right across the available display area, then wrap to the next line.

    To create additional views, click the Modify Settings And Columns link to display a Customization page, and then click the Create A New View link at the bottom of the page.

  • Search Documents. This area appears just below the Select A View area. To locate documents that contain a given word or phrase. Enter the text in the box provided, and click Go.
  • New Document. Click this link to begin editing a new document you plan to store in the current library. If the library specifies a template, the Web page downloads it, starts the appropriate editor, and specifies the current library as the default save location. If the library has no defined template, the Web page starts Microsoft Word.

  • TIP:
    When saving documents into a SharePoint team Web site library (or saving them to disk in preparation for upload to a team Web site library), it’s usually best to save them in HTML format. That way, other team members can view and annotate the document directly in their browsers. If you save or upload a non-HTML document in its native format, other team members will have to download the document, open it with another program, and then upload it again if they’ve made any changes.

  • Upload Document. Click this link to display an Upload Document page that uploads a document from your computer and adds it to the library.
  • Filter. Click this link to limit the list of documents based on criteria you specify. The team Web site redisplays the current Web pages, adding selection controls above each selectable column heading.
  • Subscribe. Click this link to display a New Subscription page. This page tells SharePoint Team Services to send you an e-mail message whenever someone changes the contents of a document or folder within the library.

  • NOTE:
    Subscription is a pervasive feature. You can subscribe to receive change notifications regarding almost any aspect of a team Web site.

  • Modify Settings And Columns. Click this link to display a Customization page that modifies the name of library, its assigned template, its presence or absence on the quick launch bar, and so forth.
  • Significantly, clicking this link also provides options that add or remove columns (that is, fields) from the document listing. You can use theseextra columns to record anything you want about the documents in the library, and then to sort or filter documents on that basis. For example, you could add fields to record the:

    • Name of the product that the document describes.
    • Product version.
    • Document version.
    • Contract or customer for whom you created the document.


Troubleshooting

Team Web Site document search displays message, "Service is not running"

When using a Team Web Site, entering a search phrase in a Search Documents box and clicking Go might result in the following message:

Service is not running.

This message appears if Microsoft Indexing Service isn’t running on the Web server where the Team Web Site resides. To start this service:

  1. Choose Programs from the Windows Start menu.
  2. Choose Computer Management from the Administrative Tools menu.
  3. By default, the Computer Management application manages the local
    computer. To control Indexing Service on a different computer, right-click Computer Management (Local), choose Connect To Another Computer, select the name of the server where the Team Web Site resides, and click OK.
  4. Expand the Services And Applications entry.
  5. Right-click the Indexing Service entry, and then choose Start from the shortcut menu. Click Yes when prompted to start Indexing Service. (If no Indexing Service entry appears, Microsoft Indexing Service isn’t installed on the computer. The topic "Installing IIS on Windows 2000" in Chapter 37 explains how to install Indexing Service.)
  6. Click the Indexing Service entry once, and observe the display in the right pane of the Computer Management window. This display contains one line for each Indexing Service catalog. Here are your options:
    • If none of the catalogs include your Web server’s root folder, right-click Indexing Service, choose New from the shortcut menu, and then choose Catalog. In the Name field, give the catalog a name that relates it to your Web server. In the Location field, specify the physical location of your Web server’s root folder. Finally, click OK.
    • If a suitable catalog already exists, observe the Total Docs and Docs To Index columns in the Computer Management window’s right pane. When Total Docs is not zero and Docs to Index is zero, Indexing Service has finished analyzing your Web server.

  7. Try rerunning the Team Web Site search. If you still get the same error message, try stopping and restarting IIS. If the search still fails, try rebooting the server.


Each line in the main document area of a Document Library View page (Figure 35-3) contains the following clickable areas:

  • File Name. Click any file name (or its icon) to open the file for viewing. If the file is a type that the browser can display, the browser displays it. Otherwise, the browser treats it as a download and starts the application on your computer that’s associated with the file type.
  • Edit. Click this icon to display an Edit Item page that updates the corresponding file or any information that describes it.
  • Modified By. Click any name in this column to display a Personal Settings page that displays information about that team member.

Click any Edit icon in the Document Library View page to display the Edit Item Form page shown in Figure 35-4.

Figure 35-4. This SharePoint team Web site page displays a list of document properties you can edit. (Image Unavailable)

This form provides the following capabilities:

  • Save And Close. Click this link to save any changes you’ve made and return to the document library listing.
  • Delete. Click this link to delete the current document from the library.
  • Send For Review. Click this link to send e-mail to anyone you specify,asking that person to review the current library document.
  • Discuss. Click this link to open the current document for review andannotation.
  • Edit In <application>. Click this link to start the application associated with the current document and tell it to load the document from the Web server.
  • Go Back To Document Library. Click this link to abandon any changes you’ve made and return to the document library listing.
  • Document Information Fields. The central portion of the form contains form elements for all the editable fields that describe the document. To change any of this data, update the corresponding field and then click Save And Close.

With two exceptions, these options are relatively straightforward. The exceptionsinvolve the options Discuss and Send For Review (which uses Discuss).

Using Web Discussions

The Discuss option is what most Office applications call Web Discussions. Despite the similarity in names, it has nothing to do with SharePoint team Web site Discussion Groups. Web Discussions provide a way to add yellow "sticky notes" to a document and to share those notes with others—all without actually updating the document itself. This is possible because the "sticky note" information resides in a database on a so-called discussion server. This can be any SQL Server or MSDE database that servicesa team Web site.

This is a very useful approach, because several people can review and annotate thesame document simultaneously, and then the document owner can see all their suggestions merged together. There are no concerns about someone accidentally updating the document itself, because no one can update the document at all.

One of three things can happen when you click the Discuss link on the Edit ItemForm page:

  • If Microsoft Internet Explorer isn’t configured to use a discussion server,it displays the dialog box shown in Figure 35-5 asking whether you’d liketo specify one.
  • Figure 35-5. Discussing a document requires access to a discussion server that stores any comments you make. If Internet Explorer doesn’t know the name of the discussion server, it displays this prompt.  (Image unavailable)

  • If the document is in HTML format, reviewers can view the documentand add their sticky notes using nothing but a Web browser. This mode of operation integrates perfectly with other SharePoint team Web site features, and it’s a very good reason to save all documents in a team Web site in HTML format.
  • If the document isn’t in HTML format, reviewers must download the document into the Office application that created it, choose Online Collaboration from the Tools menu, and possibly specify a discussion server by hand.


TIP:
The Save As Web Page option in most Office applications saves all the properties and features that saving in the native application format does. That is, saving and opening a document in HTML format provides all the same features as saving and opening a document in .doc, .xls, or .ppt format.

Figure 35-6 shows Internet Explorer accepting discussion comments for a document. The Web visitor:

  1. Displayed the Document Library View form shown in Figure 35-3.
  2. Clicked the Edit icon for the deliverables file. This displayed the Edit Item Form page shown in Figure 35-4.
  3. Clicked the Discuss icon in the Edit Item Form page, and then displayed the Enter Discussion Text dialog box.
  4. Figure 35-6. The sticky note icons show where you can append comments to the document. Click one to display the Enter Discussion Text dialog box. (Image Unavailable)

Click the Discuss icon to immediately display the Discussion bar shown at the bottom of Figure 35-6. (In Internet Explorer 5.5 or later, you might need to choose Explorer Bar from the View menu, and then choose Discuss.) The same command hides theDiscussion bar if it’s already on display. Here’s how to use the buttons on this bar (note that these buttons will be available or unavailable depending on the type of document):

  • Discussions. Click this button to display a menu containing the following options:
    • Insert In The Document. Choose this command to display or hide all possible locations for inline sticky notes (those that appear inline with the document text). There’s basically one sticky note location per paragraph. To add text to a new or existing sticky note, click it.
    • Insert About The Document. Choose this command to display an Enter Discussion Text dialog box where you can enter discussion comments about the document in general.
    • Refresh Discussions. Choose this command to retrieve a current set of discussion comments from the discussion server. Your display will then reflect changes other visitors might have made after you first displayed the page.
    • Filter Discussions. Choose this command to display discussion comments from only a certain participant, or within a certain time span.
    • Print Discussions. Choose this command to print the discussion comments.
    • Discussion Options. Choose this command to select the discussion server and the discussion fields to display.


    NOTE:
    To host discussions on one server about documents on another, first open the document and then, on the Discussions toolbar, choose Discussion Options from the Discussions drop-down list. Finally, select the server that records discussion items from the Select A Discussion Server drop-down list.

  • Insert Discussion In The Document. Click this button to perform the same function as the Insert In The Document menu command just described.
  • Insert Discussion About The Document. Click this button to performthe same function as the Insert About The Document menu command just described.
  • Expand All Discussions. Click this button to display the title, text, and all other fields for each discussion comment.
  • Collapse All Discussions. Click this button to hide the contents of all discussion comments. A sticky note with a plus icon appears in place of each comment. To expand a particular comment, click the plus icon.
  • Show General Discussions. Click this button to display all general (non-inline) discussion comments made about an HTML document.
  • Previous. Click this button to display the previous discussion comment.
  • Next. Click this button to display the next discussion comment.
  • Subscribe. Click this button if you want to get an e-mail notification whenever someone updates either the current document or any document in the same folder.
  • Stop Communication With Discussion Server. Click this button if you want to disconnect an HTML document from the discussion server.
  • Show/Hide Discussion Pane. Click this toggle button to display or hide the discussion pane.
  • Close. Click this button to close the Web discussion.
  • Reply With Changes. Composes an e-mail message to the originator of a document, informing that person that you’ve added discussion comments to it.

Discussion text also appears—in almost identical format—when the original user opens the HTML file in Word. In fact, all discussion text from all users is merged seamlessly into place. (If no discussions appear, choose Online Collaboration fromthe Tools menu, and make sure the correct discussion server is specified.)

Using Subscriptions

Click any Subscribe link on a SharePoint team Web site page (such as the Document Library View page shown in Figure 35-3) to display the New Subscription page shown in Figure 35-7 on the next page. To display the Document Subscription dialog box shown in Figure 35-8 on the next page, click Subscribe on the Discussion bar. Both this dialog box and the New Subscription page serve the same function: you can subscribe to change notices on the current document or on any document in a specified folder (subject to filters); set notification criteria; specify your e-mail address; and indicate how long SharePoint Team Services should accumulate changes before sending them.

Figure 35-9 on page 993 shows a typical change notification message. Although the message in the figure provides only one notification, a single message can report multiple changes.

Figure 35-7. This Web page subscribes an e-mail user to change notifications for a given document or folder. (Image Unavailable)

The notification process periodically scans a database and combines all notificationsto the same recipient. The less often you choose to receive messages, the more notifi-cations each message will contain.

The Subscription feature of a SharePoint team Web site isn’t limited to Web Discussion comments that team members make using Internet Explorer. On the contrary, team members can subscribe for notification of almost any change to a team Web site.

Figure 35-8. This is the dialog box version of the Web page that appears in Figure 35-7. (Image unavailable)

Figure 35-9. A SharePoint team Web site sent this change notification automatically. (Image unavailable)


Troubleshooting

Subscribers don’t receive SharePoint team Web site change notifications

SharePoint team Web site members who subscribe to receive change notifications might not receive the expected mail for any of the following reasons:

  • Not enough time has passed. SharePoint team Web sites send notifications at intervals even if a team member chose to receive them "When A Change Occurs." These intervals apply to the entire Web server, and are thus something an administrator must control. The following settings are the defaults, but your server’s configuration might vary:
    • Immediate Notifications. Every five minutes.
    • Daily Notifications. Midnight.
    • Weekly Notifications. Sunday midnight.
  • Server settings might be incomplete. The server administrator must configure SharePoint Team Services with the name of an SMTP mail server and an address that will appear in the From and Reply To fields of each outgoing message.
  • The Web Subscriptions feature might be disabled. The server administrator can turn off the Web Subscriptions features at the server level. Obviously, this inhibits the transmission of notification messages.


Using Discussion Boards

A SharePoint team Web site discussion board works a lot like an Internet newsgroup or a FrontPage Discussion Web. Team members can post new messages, respond to existing messages, and view messages in their entirety or in condensed lists. Whoever administers the team Web site can purge and correct messages, alter discussion board settings and defaults, and so forth. If security settings permit, team members can initiate and control their own discussion boards, and whoever posts a message can subsequently revise or delete it.

Figure 35-11 shows a summary view of a typical discussion board. To display this Web page:

  1. Choose Discussion Boards from the menu bar of any page in the SharePoint team Web site. This displays the Discussion Boards page shown in Figure 35-10, which displays the name and description of each available discussion board. The General Discussion board appears by default as part of every new team Web site. You can do the following:
    • To create additional boards, click the New Discussion Board link. This displays a New page that initializes a new discussion board.
    • To discuss a specific document on the Web, click Discuss A Document. This provides an entry point to the Web Discussions feature described in the section titled "Using Web Discussions" earlier in this chapter.

    Figure 35-10. This page provides a selection list of SharePoint team Web site discussion boards. The single discussion shown appears by default in every new team Web site.  (Image Unavailable)

  2. To view or modify the contents of an existing discussion board, click its icon or title. This displays a Discussion Board View page like the one shown in Figure 35-11. Figure 35-12 illustrates expanded view.
  3. Figure 35-11. Click a discussion board name or icon in Figure 35-10 to display a list of messages like this.  (Image Unavailable)

    Figure 35-12. Click the Expanded link in a Discussion Board View page (Figure 35-11) to display this view of the messages in a discussion board. (Image Unavailable)

Here’s how to use the various links on a Discussion Board View page:

  • Select A View. Click any link in this area (at the left of the page) to display the discussion in the format you want. Summary view, the default, is the mode shown in Figure 35-11. To create additional views , click the Modify Settings And Columns link near the right border of the page.
  • New Discussion. Click this link to initiate discussion on a new topic (that is, to create a new top-level message). Figure 35-13 shows the Web page that supports this function. (Remember, to create a new discussion board, click the New Discussion Board link in the Discussion Boards list, shown in Figure 35-10.)
  • Figure 35-13. This Web page starts a new discussion thread. To display it, click any New Discussion link. (Image unavailable)

  • Filter. Click this link to limit the displayed messages based on criteria you specify.
  • Subscribe. Click this link if you want to receive e-mail notification whenever someone changes the contents of the discussion board.
  • Modify Settings And Columns. Click this link to display a Customization page that modifies the name of the discussion board, its description, its columns, or its views. The SharePoint team Web site keeps all this information in its database, and then adds it—on the fly—to any relevant Web pages.
  • Subject, Modified By, and Modified. Click any of these column headings to sort the display on that column.
  • Subject Titles. Click any entry in the Subject column to select and display it.
  • Modified By Names. Click any entry in the Modified By column to display information about that person.

Click the title of a message in the Discussion Board View page (Figure 35-11) to bring up the Display Discussion Article page shown in Figure 35-14. The title and body of the current message appear under the second menu bar.

Figure 35-14. Click the Subject text of any message to display both the message and its position in the thread. (Image unavailable)

The menu bar itself contains the following links:

  • Reply. Click this link to create a new message that responds to the current one. The new message appears beneath the existing one, indented one level to the right. Figure 35-13 shows the New Discussion page that appears when you click the Reply link.
  • Edit Item. Click this link to modify the current message. Depending on settings in effect for the discussion board, this might be possible only foran administrator or the person who originated the message.
  • Delete Item. Click this link to delete the current message. Again, this might be possible only for an administrator or the person who originated the message.
  • Go Back To Discussion Board. Click this link to back up one screen (usually to the Discussion Board View page shown in Figure 35-11).

Using Lists

Click the Lists link on the menu bar of any page in a SharePoint team Web site to display the Lists page shown in Figure 35-15. This is basically a list of all the lists in the current team Web site. All five lists itemized in the figure appear by default in any new team Web site.

Figure 35-15. This page identifies the lists in a SharePoint team Web site. The lists shown here appear by default in every new team Web site. (Image unavailable)

Physically, a list is nothing more than a table in a database. Each list item is a table row and, as you’ve probably guessed, each list column is a table column. The SharePoint team Web site can create new tables (that is, lists), add columns, modify columns, and delete columns using Web pages that are part of (and integrated with) the team Web site.

Click the entry for any list in the List page to display a List View page like the one shown in Figure 35-16. The links on this page work much like those already described for document libraries and discussion boards (are you noticing a pattern?), but here’s a brief summary:

  • Select A View. Click any link in this area to display the list in the format you want.
  • New Item. Click this link to display a page named New Item Form that adds a new item to the list.
  • Filter. Click this link to limit the displayed messages based on criteria you specify.
  • Export. Click this link to download a Microsoft Excel Web Query file that downloads the data in the list. Such files have a .iqy filename extension that’s normally associated with Microsoft Excel. When you open such a file, Excel connects to the SharePoint team Web site database and downloads the data for the list you requested.
  • This is a highly useful approach because every time you open the Web Query file, Excel connects to the database server and downloads a fresh copy of the data in the list. This saves you from downloading fresh copies of the data manually. If you want to save a copy of the data as of some specific point in time, copy it from the query region and paste it into another spreadsheet.

    Figure 35-16. Click a list name or icon in a List page (Figure 35-15) to display the items in the list.  (Image unavailable)

  • Subscribe. Click this link if you want to receive e-mail notification whenever someone changes the contents of the list.
  • Modify Settings And Columns. Click this link to change the properties of the list. This includes the name, description, columns, views, and other settings.

The five lists shown in Figure 35-15 all contain different combinations of fields and different views. Nevertheless, they’re all simple database tables that operate using the same basic principles.

Creating New Libraries, Discussions, and Lists

Click the Create link on any SharePoint team Web site menu bar to display the Create Page page shown in Figures 35-17 and 35-18. This page has the following options:

  • Custom List. This option, the first on the page, creates a list with only one column: Title. After the list exists, of course, you can display it and then click Modify Settings And Columns to add more columns, delete the Title column, or make any other changes you want.
  • Import Spreadsheet. This option, the last on the page, creates a list from data contained in a spreadsheet. Each row of spreadsheet data becomes one list record, and each column of spreadsheet data becomes a list column. The values in the first row will become the column names in the list.
  • When using this option, the SharePoint team Web site doesn’t actually upload the spreadsheet as a file and then process it on the server. Instead, it opens Excel on your computer. Excel then opens the spreadsheet you specified, prompts for a range of cells to upload, and then transmits the values of those cells. This is much more flexible than uploading the entire file and converting its contents to a list.

All the other choices are basically variations of the Custom List choice, with the exception that each of them initializes the new list with a different collection of fields and formats. If one of these list types is nearly or exactly what you want, choose it. Otherwise, it’ll probably be easier to use the Custom List choice than to delete all the extra columns another choice provides.

Creating a New Survey

Surveys are a particularly interesting type of list. As with all surveys, there are four basic steps:

  1. Decide what questions you want to ask.
  2. Design a form people can use to record their answers.
  3. Let the survey population fill out the form.
  4. Analyze the results.

Although a SharePoint team Web site can’t choose questions for you, it does most of the work for the three remaining steps. This section explains how to create a survey and, along the way, how to perform a myriad of tasks useful for creating other lists as well. Here’s the procedure:

  1. Click the Create link on any SharePoint team Web site menu bar. This displays the Create Page page shown in Figures 35-17 and 35-18.
  2. Click the Survey link shown in Figure 35-17. This displays the New Survey page partially shown in Figure 35-19 on the next page.
  3. Figure 35-17. This Web page has links for creating lists, discussion boards, and document libraries of all kinds.  (Image unavailable)

    Figure 35-18. This is the bottom half of the Web page that starts in Figure 35-17. (Image unavailable)

    Figure 35-19. Click the Survey link in a Create Page page (Figure 35-17) to display this Web page for creating a new survey. (Image unavailable)

    Fill out the input options as follows:

    • Name. Give the survey a short, descriptive name.
    • Description. If you want, enter a few sentences that explain the survey and its purpose.
    • Display This Survey On The Quick Launch Bar? Click Yes if you want all Quick Launch areas in the current SharePoint team Web site to contain a link to this survey. Otherwise click No. Use this feature judiciously; a Quick Launch bar containing hundreds of links isn’t much of a time saver.
    • Show User Name In Survey Results? Click Yes if displays of survey results should include then name of each respondent. Click No to keep these names private.
    • Allow Multiple Responses? Click Yes if the same person can fill out the survey multiple times. Click No if each person can submit responses only once.
    Click the Next button when you’re satisfied with your entries.

  4. The next page to appear is the Create New Question page shown in Figures 35-20 and 35-21. This Web page constructs the first survey question.
  5. Figure 35-20. This page adds a question to an existing survey. This is quite useful because creating a new survey creates only one question. (Image unavailable)

    Figure 35-21. This is the bottom half of the Web page that begins in Figure 35-20. (Image unavailable)

    Here’s how to use the input options provided:

    • Question. Enter the text for the first question in the survey.
    • The Type Of Answer To This Question Is. Indicate what type of data constitutes the survey answer. Table 35-1 summarizes the result of each choice.

    Table 35-1. SharePoint team Web site Survey Answer Types

    Type of answerInput form
    Single Line Of TextText box
    Multiple Lines Of TextText area box
    Number (1, 1.0, 100)Text box
    Currency ($, ¥, £)Text box
    Date And Time (11/02/2001 12:15)Combination of text box (for date) and drop-down lists (for hour and minute)
    Lookup (Information Already On This Site)Drop-down list
    Choice (Menu To Choose From)Drop-down list or option buttons
    Yes/No (Check Box)Check box

    The Lookup choice warrants a bit of additional explanation. This choice populates a drop-down list with all values that occur in a given list and column within the SharePoint team Web site. For example, this could include all Full Name values in the User Information list, all Titles in the Shared Documents library, all E-Mail Addresses in the Contacts list, and so forth. To configure a Lookup choice, you specify first the name of the list you want and then the column.

  6. The bottom half of the Edit Question page changes depending on the type of answer you specify. Figure 35-21 shows the format that appears if you choose Choice (Menu To Choose From). Enter each option as follows:
    • Require A Response To This Question. Click Yes if the survey respondent must answer the question before proceeding. Click No if answering the question is optional.
    • Type Each Choice On A Separate Line. Enter the list of choices. Separate choices by entering a carriage return.
    • Display Choices Using. Select either Drop-Down Menu or Radio Buttons depending on how you want respondents to view the choices.
    • Default Value. Enter the name of the choice that will be selected when the respondent first displays the Web page that contains this question.

    Click OK to finish creating the survey question.

  7. The Customization page partially shown in Figure 35-22 is the next page to appear.
  8. Figure 35-22. This page modifies the overall properties of a survey.

    It provides the following links:

    • Change General Settings. Displays a Change General Settings page very similar to the one shown in Figure 35-19. This provides a way to update these settings without recreating the survey.
    • Delete This Survey. Removes the survey forms, links, and data from the SharePoint team Web site.
    • Question (Click To Edit). Click the text of any question listed under this heading to change the text or format of that question, or to delete the question completely.
    • Add A Question. Click this link to add the second, third, and all subsequent questions in the survey. Basically, you must click this link and then repeat steps 3 and 4 once for each question.
    • Change The Order Of The Questions. Click this link to display a listof current questions and question numbers. The question numbers appear in drop-down lists that you can manipulate to put the questions in any order.

Figure 35-23 on the next page shows how the Status Assessment survey appears to a survey respondent. This is a custom survey created by using the procedure just described, and not a standard element of every new SharePoint team Web site.

Figure 35-23. This is how the survey looks to a survey respondent. The survey itself is just a list with a column for recording each answer. (Image unavailable)

Here’s how to display this page:

  1. Click the Lists link on the menu bar of any page in a SharePoint team Web site.
  2. Click the survey’s list title or its preceding icon. This displays the Overview page shown in Figure 35-24.
  3. Figure 35-24. The entry point for analyzing survey results is this Web page. (Image unavailable)

    The Overview page contains the following choices:

    • Respond To This Survey. Click this link to answer all the survey questions.
    • Export Results To A Spreadsheet. Click this link to download an Excel Web Query (.iqy) file that downloads the survey data into a spreadsheet.
    • For more information about downloading list data, refer to "Using Lists" earlier in thischapter.

    • Subscribe. Click this link if you want to receive e-mail notification whenever someone completes or changes the survey.
    • Modify Survey And Questions. Click this link to change the properties of the survey. This includes the name, description, questions, and other settings. In short, it displays the Customization page partially shown in Figure 35-22.
    • Show A Graphical Summary Of Questions. Click this link to display a graphical summary of survey responses like the one shown in Figure 35-25.
    • Show All Responses. Click this link to display a textual listing of survey responses like the one shown in Figure 35-26 on the next page.
    • Figure 35-25. The graphical summary of survey responses looks like this. (Image unavailable)

Creating other kinds of lists follows basically the same pattern as creating a survey. This is because, in fact, a survey is nothing but a list where each row is a survey response and each column an answer.

Figure 35-26. This Web page displays all responses to a survey. (Image unavailable)

Administering SharePoint Team Web Site Settings

To modify and configure settings that apply to the entire SharePoint team Web site, click the Site Settings link in the menu bar of any team Web site page. This displays the Site Settings page shown in Figures 35-27 and 35-28.

On this page are the following:

  • Web Site Settings. The first portion of the Site Settings page controlsthe SharePoint team Web site’s name, description, and home page layout. These are the links in this portion:
    • Change Site Name And Description. Click this link to display a Change Site Name And Description page that modifies the nameand description of the SharePoint team Web site.
    • Customize Home Page Layout. Click this link to display a Home Page Layout page that determines which lists should appear in the center column of the SharePoint team Web site’s home page and which should appear in the right column. (Recall that the left column of the home page contains the Quick Launch area, and that the Customization page for each list controls whether that list appears in the Quick Launch area.)
    • In general, only the most popular lists should appear on the home page. Team members should click Documents, Discussion Boards, or Lists to access the rest.

      Figure 35-27. The Site Settings page controls properties that affect an entire SharePoint team Web site(Image unavailable)

      Figure 35-28. This is the bottom half of the Site Settings page that appears in Figure 35-27. (Image unavailable)

  • Web Administration. This portion of the Site Settings page contains links that add or remove users, create subwebs, and jump to overall site administration. Here are the links:
    • Manage Users. Click this link to display the Web page that adds, removes, or changes the roles of users who have access to one or more Webs on the current server.
    • If a SharePoint team Web site has no designated users, the Manage Users link and the Send An Invitation link described next won’t appear. Instead, a Change Permissions link appears. Use the Change Permissions link to add one or more users. The Manage Users and Send An Invitation links will then appear.

      For more information about managing user access to FrontPage-based Webs, refer to "Managing Users" on page 1107.

    • Send An Invitation. Click this link to run a wizard that gives team members access to the SharePoint team Web site and sends them e-mail. The e-mail describes the team Web site and invites them to participate.
    • Create A Subweb. Click this link to create a subweb within the SharePoint team Web site.
    • Go To Site Administration. Click this link to display the Administration page for the SharePoint team Web site.
    • For more information about the Administration page for FrontPage-based Webs, refer to "Administering SharePoint Team Services Web Settings" on page 1101.

  • User Information. This portion of the Site Settings page provides options to modify your own SharePoint team Web site account or, if you’re an administrator, the accounts of others. This portion’s links are as follows:
    • Edit My Information. Click this link to display a Personal Settings page that shows and modifies your own user account information.
    • A hyperlink titled Edit User Information updates your full name, the address to use for sending e-mail, and any notes you care to provide.

      A hyperlink named Change Password changes your password.

      A hyperlink named Manage Personal Subscriptions displays all subscriptions you currently have in effect, and provides a way to delete those you no longer want.

    • View User Information. Click this link to display a list of users who have participated in or been invited to use the current SharePoint team Web site. This page contains hyperlinks to add or remove users, to invite new users, and to modify the full names, e-mail addresses, and notes pertaining to any known user.
  • Modify Site Content. This portion of the Site Settings page contains links to customize each document library, discussion board, and list in the current SharePoint team Web site. These links display the same pages that displaying the list and clicking Modify Settings And Columns would display.

Creating Custom List Pages

SharePoint team Web sites provide a wealth of methods for modifying their features and appearance. Even so, there might be times when you need more flexibility and need it badly enough to dive in and work directly with the Web pages. This section explains the options and techniques for doing just that.


TIP:
The easiest way by far to create a new list is by clicking the New List link or the SharePoint team Web site Lists page. Similarly, the easiest way to modify a list is by clicking the Modify settings and columns link on its main Web page.

The first option, of course, is simply to open the SharePoint team Web site, find the team Web site page you want to change, and open it in Page view. This works subject to one large restriction: team Web site pages submit input to and receive output from a number of programs that run on the Web server, and you can’t readily change these programs. (They’re not ASP pages, for example). Therefore, anything you do that upsets the interface between team Web site pages and team Web site server programs breaks the site. Chapters 8 and 9 explained the structure of a SharePoint team Web site and gave some precautions for modifying constituent pages.

For more information about creating a SharePoint team Web site, refer to "Creating a SharePoint Team Web Site" on page 248. For more information about creating, saving, and opening files in a SharePoint team Web site, refer to "Saving and Opening Files in SharePoint Team Web Sites" on page 266.

Creating and Modifying Library View Pages

Figure 35-29 on the next page shows a Web page that’s a curious mix of SharePoint team Web site and custom features. The menu bar and data in the center of the page come from the Share Documents library of a SharePoint team Web site. Nevertheless, the page contains custom formatting and could contain custom content as well. What’s more, this is a page you can create yourself from scratch. Here’s the procedure:

  1. Start FrontPage and create a new empty Web page.
  2. Choose Web Component from the Insert menu.
  3. When the Insert Web Component dialog box appears, choose Document Library View from the Component type list at the left, and a View Style from the Choose A View Style list at the right. Don’t agonize over the View Style; you can easily change this later. Click Finish.
  4. When the Choose Document Library box shown at the left of Figure 35-30 appears, choose the SharePoint team Web site shared document library you’d like to display, and then click OK.
  5. Figure 35-29. You can construct replacement Team Web pages that look any way (and display any additional content) you want. (Image unavailable)

    When the Document Library View Properties dialog box shown at the right of Figure 35-30 appears, review the settings list at the right of each vertically arranged button.

    Figure 35-30. The dialog box at the left selects the document library that a Document Library View area will report. The dialog box at the right provides entry to all configurable aspects of a Document Library View area.  (Image unavailable)

  6. Click Library to choose a different document library. This redisplays the Choose Document Library box shown at the left of Figure 35-30 so youcan choose a different library.
  7. Click Fields to change the information displayed for each document. The Displayed Fields dialog box shown at the left of Figure 35-31 appears.
  8. Figure 35-31. The Displayed Fields dialog box at the left controls which fields a Document Library View area will display. The Sort dialog box at the right controls which fields affect the item display order. (Image unavailable)

    Make any necessary changes by using the following options:

    • Available Fields. This list contains all the fields in the shared document library that the current Web page doesn’t already display. To display any of these fields, either double-click it or select it and click Add.
    • Add. Click this button to move any selected fields from the Available Fields list to the Displayed Fields list.
    • Remove. Click this button to move any selected fields from the Displayed Fields list to the list Available Fields. (Compared to the Add button, this is a case of "Second verse, played in reverse.")
    • Move Up. Click this button to move any fields selected in the Displayed Fields list one position higher in that list.
    • Move Down. Click this button to move any fields selected in the Displayed Fields list one position lower in that list. (A clear case of "What goes up…")
    • Displayed Fields. This box lists all the document library fields that the current Web page displays. To remove any of these fields, either double-click it or select it and click Remove.

    After some field names, the Displayed Fields dialog box displays a suffix that refers to a link. One of these, for example, is Edit (Link To Edit Item). If you included such a field on your page (that is, if you add it to the Displayed Fields list), a visitor can click the displayed value to invoke the corresponding action (for example, Edit).


    INSIDEOUT:
    Unfortunately, linked fields in a Document Library View area suffer a major restriction: you have no control over the linked field’s URL. If you plan to use such links, you must put the pages where the SharePoint team Web site software expects them to be, and that means replacing the standard pages created when you initialized the team Web site, document library, or list.

    Currently there appears to be no workaround for this restriction. Try searching Micro-soft’s knowledge base for more information; the URL is http://search.microsoft.com.


  9. Click Sort to change the initial order of the listed documents. This displays the Sort dialog box shown at the right of Figure 35-31, which provides the following controls:
    • Available Fields. This list contains all the fields in the shared document library that don’t currently control the order of listed records. To use a field for sorting, either double-click it or select it and click Add.
    • Add. Click this button to move any selected fields from the Available Fields list to the Sort Order list.
    • Remove. Click this button to move any selected fields from the Sort Order list to the Available Fields list.
    • Move Up. Click this button to move any fields selected in the Sort Order list one position higher in that list.
    • Move Down. Click this button to move any fields selected in the Sort Order list one position lower in that list.
    • Change Sort. Click this button to reverse the order of any selected Sort Order fields (from ascending to descending or vice versa).
    • Sort Order. This box lists all the document libraries that the current Web page displays. To remove any of these fields, either double-click it or select it and click Remove.

  10. Click Filter to display only selected records from the current document library. This displays the Filter Criteria dialog box shown in Figure 35-32, which lists any criteria already in effect.
  11. The following options appear in the Filter Criteria dialog box:

    • Add. Click this button to define an additional filter. When the Add Filter dialog box shown in the center of Figure 35-32 appears, configure the following options:
      • Field Name. Select the field whose value you want to test.
      • Comparison. Specify the operator for the comparison: Equals, Not Equal, Less Than, and so forth.
      • Value. Enter the value that forms the basis for the comparison. For date fields, click Choose and then use the Date Value dialog box that appears at the right of Figure 35-32 to specify the value you want. Current Date means the date that the Web server processes the visitor’s request. Specific Date means a date you type by hand.
      • For non-date fields, enter the desired value in the text box provided.

      • And/Or. Choose And if other filters, as well as this one, must be true for the record to be selected. Choose Or if this is one of several filters, any of which, if true, are sufficient to select the record.

    • Modify. Click this button to change an existing filter. This displays a Modify Filter dialog box that looks and works very much like the Add Filter dialog box just described. This button i s dimmed unless you’ve already selected a filter.
    • Remove. Click this button to remove an existing filter. The button is dimmed unless you’ve already selected a filter.

    Figure 35-32. The Filter Criteria dialog box lists any current restrictions on the items displayed. Click its Add button to display the Add Filter dialog box, which adds a new filter to the list. If the filter involves a date field, click the Choose button to display the Date Value dialog box. (Image unavailable)

  12. Click Options to display the View Options dialog box shown in Figure35-33. This dialog box configures the following settings:
    • Choose A Style. Choose a page layout design for the documentlibrary records.
    • Toolbar Type. Choose the type of toolbar that will appear above the library listing:
      • Full Toolbar. Choose this option to display a toolbar with five links: New Document, Upload Document, Filter, Subscribe, and Modify Settings And Columns.
      • Summary Toolbar. Choose this option to display a toolbar with two links: Shared Documents and Add New Document.
      • None. Choose this option if you don’t want to have a toolbar at all.

      The links on these toolbars follow the standard conventions that apply to SharePoint team Web sites. You can’t, for example, change them so they jump to custom pages.

      Figure 35-33. Use this dialog box to specify the style, toolbar type, item limit, and zero-items message for a Document Library View area. (Image unavailable)

    • Display All Items Together And Limit The Total Number To. Select this option if you want the query to display all results on a single Web page. To avoid runaway queries, you should also enter a workable maximum record count in the accompanying text box.
    • Display Items In Sets Of This Size. Select this option if you want the query to display a specific number of records on the first Web page, and then provide a Next link that displays the next group of like records.
    • Text To Display If No Matching Items Are Found. Enter the message you want visitors to see if the library is empty or fails all filtering criteria. (For example, you might display "Thanks, you’ve just deleted our last six months’ work.")

  13. When you’re done adjusting options, click OK on the Document Library View Properties dialog box (the right side of Figure 35-30).
At this point your new Web page should display a recognizable SharePoint team Web site document list, albeit crudely formatted. Figure 35-34 provides an example. You can apply any formatting or add any additional content you want.

Figure 35-34. By default, creating a new Document Library View area provides very little formatting. (Image unavailable)

To change any structural aspect of the Document Library View area, double-click it or right-click it and choose View Properties from the shortcut menu. Both actions display the Document Library View Properties dialog box already described. It works the same for changing a view area as it does for creating one.

To perform more radical surgery, right-click the Document Library View area and choose Layout Customization View from the shortcut menu. This changes the Page view display to the format shown in the background of Figure 35-35 on the next page. The library view area in the figure now looks like a table with six rows, but four of them are comments and two are very special. (If you chose a different layout style, your row numbers might differ, but the concepts are the same.)


INSIDEOUT:
After you’ve switched a Document Library View area to Layout Customization View, you can change it back by right-clicking the area and choosing Live Data View from the shortcut menu. When you do so, however, FrontPage discards any changes you made while in Customization view. This is the price for making changes in a more flexible way than Live Data View can accommodate. Think carefully before changing back to Live Data View.

Figure 35-35. The List Field component displays the name or current value of any field in a document library or list. (Image unavailable)

In the library view area:

  • The comment rows are 1, 3, 5, and 6.
  • Row 2 contains the column headings. This row appears only once whenever a visitor displays a page that contains it.
  • Row 4 contains a template for record values. The SharePoint team Web site software duplicates this row once for every record it displays from the given document library.

By default, each cell in rows 2 and 4 contains a special component called a List Field. These components work a lot like Confirmation Field components in a Confirmation form, or Column Value components in a Database Results region: that is, they’re placeholders that the SharePoint team Web site software replaces with actual values when a Web visitor requests the page. You can use List Field components to display any document library field names or field values you want.

Double-clicking an existing List Field component displays the List Field Properties dialog box shown in the foreground of Figure 35-35. Right-clicking the component and choosing either List Field or List Field Properties accomplishes the same thing. Use the following fields to modify a List Field component:

  • Field To Display. Select the document library field that the List Field component should display.
  • Display Options. Select Show The Field Name to display the name of the field. This is the usual setting for List Field components used in the heading area of the List View area.
  • Select Show The Field Data to display the contents of the field. This is the usual setting for List Field components used in the repeating area of the List View area.

    To add a List Field component to an existing List View area, set the insertion point where you want it to appear, choose Form from the Insert menu, and then choose List Field.

Creating and Modifying List View Pages

If you can create and modify Library View pages, you can create and modify List View pages. The procedures are nearly identical. To get started:

  1. Start FrontPage and create a new empty Web page.
  2. Choose Web Component from the Insert menu.
  3. When the Insert Web Component dialog box appears, choose List View from the Component Type list at the left, and a View Style from the Choose A View Style list at the right. Don’t agonize over the View Style; you can easily change this later. Click Finish.

Did you catch the difference? In step 3, you choose List View rather than Document Library View from the Component Type list. That’s it. Virtually everything that pertains to document libraries pertains to lists as well. This is just what you should expect, because a Document Library View doesn’t actually display the documents in a library; it displays information from the SharePoint team Web site list that describes the documents.

There are a few other differences, such as the fact that SharePoint team Web site toolbars for document libraries and ordinary lists are slightly different. Keep an eye out for these and you shouldn’t have any problems.

Creating and Modifying List Forms

SharePoint team Web sites use a specialized Web component to create three of their most common forms. You can insert this component, and thus initialize such a form, by following this procedure:

  1. Start FrontPage and create a new empty Web page.
  2. Choose Form from the Insert menu, and then choose List Form. This displays the List Or Document Library Form dialog box shown in the foreground of Figure 35-36.
  3. Set the options in the List Or Document Library Form dialog box as follows:
    • List Or Document Library To Use For Form. Select the list or document library you want the form to update.
    • New Item Form (Used To Add New Items To The List). Select thisoption to create a form that adds new items to the list or document library.
    • Edit Item Form (Used To Edit Existing List Items). Select this optionto create a form that modifies existing items in the list or document library.
    • Display Item Form (Used To View List Items). Select this option to create a form that displays items in the list or document library.
    • Show Standard Toolbar. Select this box to display the standard SharePoint team Web site toolbar for the form type.

  4. Click OK to create the form.

As with Document Library View and List View components, Page view should now display a crudely formatted but recognizable SharePoint team Web site form. You can add whatever formatting and content you want, but there isn’t much you can do to the form itself except double-clicking it to redisplay the List Or Document Library Form dialog box.

Figure 35-36. This dialog box controls the properties of a SharePoint team Web site form page. (Image unavailable)

Again, as with Document Library View and List View components, you have very little flexibility regarding the location of pages that contain SharePoint team Web site forms. Specifically, you must locate forms that pertain to lists as follows:

Form TypeLocation relative to start of Web
New item form/Lists/<list-name>/NewForm.htm
Edit item form/Lists/<list-name>/EditForm.htm
Display item form/Lists/<list-name>/DisplayItem.htm

Here are the locations for forms that pertain to shared document libraries:

Form TypeLocation relative to start of Web
New item form/<library-name>/Forms/NewForm.htm
Edit item form/<library-name>/Forms /EditForm.htm
Display item form/<library-name>/Forms /DisplayItem.htm

These, of course, are the locations of the forms that appear automatically when you create a new document library or list. You can create pages from scratch and overlay the default ones, but in most cases it’ll be easier (and safer) to just open the default pages and modify them. That’s why Figure 35-36 shows a default list form open in the background.

In Summary…

This chapter explained how team members can use the features of a SharePoint team Web site to share documents and coordinate their activities. It also explained how to administer such a site, and how to create custom pages that perform standard functions.

The next chapter explains some terms and concepts that pertain to the Internet in general and Web servers in particular. This is background material that, if you had need of it, you’ve probably skipped ahead and read already. Nevertheless it has to go somewhere, and it might as well be here.

Meet the Author

Jim Buyens is the senior PC-LAN administrator for AG Communication Systems, a leading provider of telecommunications switching equipment and software. An early champion of TCP/IP applications and connectivity, he architected a coast-to-coast corporate network with over 25 Windows NT® based servers and 1,000 client PCs. He’s also the Webmaster at www.agcs.com, designing, deploying, and overseeing an intranet with over 14,000 Web pages. He also maintains a Web site featuring support for his books and help in finding Windows NT resources. The URL is http://www.interlacken.com. He is the author of Building Net Sites With Windows NT: An Internet Services Handbook (Addison Wesley, July 1996) and Stupid Web Tricks (Microsoft Press, 1998).

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