Microsoft Office XP Inside Out

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Hey, you know your way around the Office suite—so now dig into Office XP and really put your PC to work! Covering Microsoft Access, Excel, FrontPage, Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Word, this supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format. It’s all muscle and no fluff. Discover the best and fastest ways to perform everyday tasks, and challenge yourself to new levels of Office ...

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Overview

Hey, you know your way around the Office suite—so now dig into Office XP and really put your PC to work! Covering Microsoft Access, Excel, FrontPage, Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Word, this supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format. It’s all muscle and no fluff. Discover the best and fastest ways to perform everyday tasks, and challenge yourself to new levels of Office mastery!

  • Build on what you already know about Office and quickly dive into what’s new
  • Share information seamlessly between Office XP applications and your colleagues using SharePoint team services
  • Import real-time data into spreadsheets and Web pages
  • Create professional-quality print and online publications
  • Build your own databases, and use powerful data-analysis techniques
  • Deliver compelling PowerPoint presentations at work or through the Web
  • Use Outlook to master your schedule and e-mail communications
  • Construct and manage a Web site with advanced features
  • Develop custom solutions using macros and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications

CD-ROM FEATURES:

  • Intuitive HTML interface
  • Extensive collection of Microsoft add-ins and third-party utilities, demos, and trials
  • Macros and code samples
  • Complete eBook—easy to browse and print!
  • Sample chapters from other INSIDE OUT Office XP books
  • Web links to Microsoft Office Tools on the Web, online troubleshooters, and product support
  • Microsoft Visio customizable auto-demos
  • Additional files and templates

For customers who purchase an ebook version of this title, instructions for downloading the CD files can be found in the ebook.

This supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format. CD features Microsoft add-ins, third-party tools, macros, sample code, eBook, and more!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Microsoft Office XP has arrived, full of brand-spankin'-new task panes, wizards, Smart Tags, XML support, collaboration features, and other goodies. If you're a power user -- the person everyone else comes to when they're confused -- you'll be answering a lot of questions. No doubt, you'll have your own, too. Here's where to find the answers: Microsoft Office XP Inside Out.

Microsoft's all-new, 1,580-page book covers every program in nearly every version of Office XP: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, FrontPage, Access, even Publisher. The basics are here, but in the authors' words, they're "taught as they would be in a graduate seminar rather than in a freshman 101 course -- quickly and concisely." The heart of the book is intermediate-to-advanced coverage for folks who've been around the block with Office.

For Excel, "advanced coverage" means (among other things) in-depth coverage of organizing data with lists, filters, and pivot tables; managing shared workbooks; and a chapter on advanced business analysis with Goal Seek, the Solver, and the Scenario Manager. For Word, it means in-depth coverage of the completely revamped mail merge feature, and a full chapter on managing document review across workbooks. For Outlook, it means how to juggle email accounts, handle junk mail, organize meetings, and import contacts from your new SharePoint team web site. (Speaking of SharePoint, there's a full chapter on these new workgroup collaboration tools, too.)

Been intending to get serious about writing macros? Now's the time. Four chapters carry you through all the techniques most macro writers will ever need: variables, operators, functions, control structures, message boxes, and dialog boxes.

The accompanying CD-ROM contains the whole book in electronic format, four bonus chapters from other Office XP "Inside Out" books, plus several cool Office XP add-ins. Our favorites: the Web Template Maker, which lets you copy any open web site as a reusable template; and the MSN Money Central stock quotes add-in, which lets you embed automatically updated stock quotes in any Excel worksheet. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant and writer with nearly 20 years' experience in helping technology companies deploy and market advanced software, computing, and networking products and services. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

Booknews
This reference offers hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in a concise, fast-answer format. Halvorson (Microsoft Office and Visual Basic expert) and Young (software developer and author) present 57 chapters that help readers get started with Office; explain the shared features of the Office applications and the ways to take advantage of Office application integration; provide in-depth coverage of each of the major Office applications; and cover the common macro and development language of the Office applications, Visual Basic. (VBA). The included CD-ROM features an intuitive HTML interface, Microsoft add-ins, third- party utilities, demos, and trials; macros and sample code; additional files and templates; and more. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735612778
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 5/28/2001
  • Series: Microsoft Inside Out Series
  • Edition description: Book & CD-Rom
  • Pages: 1632
  • Product dimensions: 7.42 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 2.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Halvorson is the author or co-author of twenty computer books, including Microsoft Office XP Inside Out, Visual Basic 6 Professional Step By Step, Learn Microsoft Visual Basic 6 Now, Running Microsoft Office 2000 Premium Edition, and Microsoft Word 97/Visual Basic Step by Step. Michael earned a bachelor's degree in Computer Science from Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, and master’s and doctoral degrees in History from the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He was employed at Microsoft Corporation as a technical editor, acquisitions editor, and localization manager from 1985 to 1993. Michael currently spends his time developing innovative software solutions for Microsoft Office and Microsoft Visual Basic .NET, and teaching European history courses at colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: An Office XP Overview

A Rundown on Office XP

The Microsoft Office XP suite provides more applications and utility programs than ever before. Which ones you have depends upon which edition of Office XP you own or which individual Office applications you've obtained. This book covers all the major Office XP applications:
  • Microsoft Word (Part 3)
  • Microsoft Excel (Part 4)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint (Part 5)
  • Microsoft Outlook (Part 6)
  • Microsoft FrontPage (Part 7)
  • Microsoft Access (Part 8)
  • Microsoft Publisher (Part 9)

The book also covers many of the valuable utility programs and add-ons that are included with Office XP (or are available on the Web) and that help you work with the main applications:

  • Office Shortcut Bar (Chapter 4)
  • newfeature!  Clip Organizer (Chapter 6). See Figure 1-1 on page 4.
  • Microsoft Graph (Chapter 6)
  • Microsoft Equation (Chapter 6)
  • Save My Settings Wizard (Chapter 9)
  • Office Resource Kit, including the Custom Installation Wizard (Chapter 2)

Figure 1-1.  You can run the new Clip Organizer program in its own window, shown here, or through the new Insert Clip Art task pane. (Image Unavailable)

Even if you don't have one or more of the applications covered in this book, you might want to read some of the information about these applications to help you decide whether to add an Office program to your software collection or whether you're better off using the applications you already have.

Advantages of the Office XP Suite

Obtaining and installing the Office XP application suite, rather than acquiring individual applications here and there, isn't just a way to economize by buying programs "cheaper by the dozen." The real advantages of a software suite such as Office XP lie in the common user interface and the application integration features.

In Office XP, the individual applications share more common features than in any previous Office version. An obvious advantage of a common user interface is that once you learn one application, it's much easier to learn another. Also, as you switch between applications, you won't have to switch working modes quite so radically. And, perhaps most important, a common user interface frees your focus from the individual applications and their idiosyncrasies and lets you concentrate on the documents you're creating. The following are examples of important common features in the Office XP suite:

  • The menus, toolbars, shortcut keys, and the methods for customizing these features.
  • The common dialog boxes (notably, the Open and Save As dialog boxes), with shared features such as the Search command that now lets you find either files or Outlook items.
  • The task panes (described later in this chapter). See Figure 1-2.
  • Figure 1-2.  The new Search task pane, which is available in most Office applications, lets you locate either disk files or Outlook items. (Image Unavailable)

  • The methods for displaying and setting document properties.
  • The speech and handwriting interfaces.
  • The drawing features (Drawing toolbar, AutoShapes, Diagrams, WordArt, and others). See Figure 1-3.
  • Figure 1-3.  The new Diagram Gallery dialog box lets you quickly insert a variety of ready-made conceptual drawings. (Image Unavailable)

  • The proofing tools (Spelling, Thesaurus, AutoCorrect, and others).
  • The help interface and the Detect And Repair command.
  • The Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming features.
  • The ability to store and share documents on SharePoint team Web sites.

The Office XP applications are also more tightly integrated than ever. Application integration extends the usefulness of the individual applications. It lets you combine applications in a synergistic way to solve more complex problems and to easily accomplish otherwise difficult tasks. The following are examples of application integration features available in Office XP:

  • The Office Shortcut Bar, as well as the New Office Document and Open Office Document commands on the Start menu in Windows, which let you create or open any type of Office document
  • The ability of Office applications to import and export each other's documents (using the Open and Save As dialog boxes, as well as special purpose commands for importing and exporting documents or data)
  • The capability of using data stored in Outlook or Access when creating mail-merge documents in Word
  • Commands for linking and embedding data from several Office applications in a single compound document
  • VBA, the common programming language of the Office applications and the most powerful way to create solutions using multiple Office applications

An Office XP Map

If you're not sure where to start with Office, you can use Table 1-1 to select the best Office application to use for creating the type of document you want or for performing the task you need to complete.
NOTE:
For a more detailed rundown on an Office XP application, see the first chapter in the part of the book that covers that application.

Table 1-1. The Best Office XP Application to Use for Performing Specific Tasks

Office XP Application to Use Task
Word
  • Create general printed or online documents of all kinds—for example, memos, letters, faxes, reports, contracts, résumés, manuals, theses, and books.
  • Enter and organize research notes, outlines, and other types of free-form text information.
  • Generate form letters, envelopes, labels, and other mail-merge documents (see Figure 1-4, on page 9).
  • Print individual labels and envelopes.
  • Create general-purpose, relatively simple Web pages, which can include almost any Word document element, plus movies, sounds, forms, frames, visual themes, navigation bars, and components for accessing information on a SharePoint team Web site. Use templates to create personal Web pages and other types of pages or use the Web Page Wizard to create simple Web sites.
Excel
  • Save, organize, calculate, analyze, and chart numeric business or personal data in a spreadsheet (row and column) format. For example, balance checking accounts, prepare invoices, plan budgets, track orders, or maintain general accounting ledgers.
  • Store relatively simple text or numeric data in lists that organize the information into records (rows) and fields (columns)—for example, a product inventory or descriptions of members of your ski racing team. Sort, find, filter, automatically fill, summarize, group, outline, or subtotal data. Display data in varying combinations using pivot tables or pivot charts.
  • Publish static or interactive spreadsheets, charts, or pivot tables, for displaying numeric, text, or graphic information on the Web. Publish forms on the Web for collecting data in lists or other databases.
PowerPoint
  • Create multimedia presentations consisting of sets of slides to teach, sell, communicate, or persuade. Include text, graphics, animations, sound, and video in your presentations. Present multimedia infor-mation using 35 mm slides, transparencies for overhead projectors, speaker notes, printed handouts, or live slide shows on a computer or computer projector.
  • Publish presentations on the Web that consist of a series of multimedia slides displaying text, graphics, animations, sounds, or videos.
Outlook
  • Send, receive, and organize e-mail messages. Exchange instant Internet messages.
  • Store and manage personal information (appointments, names and addresses, to-do lists, journal entries, or free-form notes).
  • Communicate and coordinate with members of your workgroup (schedule meetings, manage group projects, and share information and files).
  • Access files on local or network disks and explore Web sites.
  • Publish snapshots of your calendar on the Web.
FrontPage
  • Create entire Web sites using templates or wizards—such as a site for establishing a corporate presence, displaying personal information, conducting an online discussion, managing a project, or accessing shared information stored on a SharePoint team Web site (see Figure 1-5). Use visual themes to apply consistent formatting to all pages in your site.
  • Manage your Web site (maintain files and folders, display reports, create and update hyperlinks, track tasks, publish your site, or control the source in workgroups).
  • Create a Web page quickly using a template or wizard (for example, a page containing a bibliography, a feedback form, or a table of contents).
  • Create or edit a Web page using a full-featured HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) editor, which supports all standard Web page elements and provides ready-to-use Web-page components (date and time stamps, comments, hover buttons and other dynamic effects, forms for searching the site, spreadsheets and charts, hit counters, galleries of photos, included files, link bars, tables of contents, site usage statistics, views of information stored on a SharePoint team Web site, and controls that display information from Web sites such as MSN).
Access
  • Store, organize, select, and present data in a relational database, which allows you to easily manage large amounts of complex or interrelated data and to divide data into separate, related tables to maximize storage efficiency.
  • Publish an interactive form on an intranet that allows users to view or update information from a database.
Publisher
  • Use wizards to create brochures, flyers, signs, greeting cards, business cards, menus, catalogs, newsletters, and other relatively short documents that have precise page layouts integrating text and graphics.
  • Create coordinated sets of publications (business cards, letterheads, envelopes, fax cover sheets, and so on).
  • Use wizards to create graphical Web pages.

Figure 1-4.  Word's new Mail Merge task pane makes it easy to create and print form letters, envelopes, labels, and other mail-merge documents. (Image Unavailable)

Figure 1-5.  In FrontPage you can create a new team Web site on a Web server running SharePoint Team Services from Microsoft. This figure shows the home page of a newly created team site. (Image Unavailable)

What's New in Office XP

The following sections briefly describe many of the new features and enhancements found in Office XP. (Office XP has so many new features and enhancements that it would be difficult to list them all!)

New Common Office XP Features

Each of the following new features is available in most—or many—of the main Office XP applications....
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Table of Contents

Pt. 1 Getting Going with Office XP 1
Ch. 1 An Office XP Overview 3
Ch. 2 Installing and Configuring Office XP 19
Ch. 3 Getting Expert Help on Office XP 29
Pt. 2 Common Office XP Techniques 41
Ch. 4 Working with Office XP Applications, Documents, and Program Windows 43
Ch. 5 New Editing and Formatting Techniques in Office XP 87
Ch. 6 Adding Professional Graphics and Special Effects to Office XP Documents 115
Ch. 7 Sharing Data Among Office XP Applications 161
Ch. 8 Using SharePoint Team Services in Professional Workgroups 183
Ch. 9 Customizing the Office XP Application Interface 205
Pt. 3 Word 225
Ch. 10 Word Fundamentals 227
Ch. 11 Efficient Editing in Word 245
Ch. 12 Effective Formatting in Word 297
Ch. 13 Arranging Text Using Tables, Columns, and Lists 339
Ch. 14 Advanced Word Formatting Techniques 385
Ch. 15 Managing Large or Complex Documents 415
Ch. 16 Using Word in Workgroups 445
Ch. 17 Proofing Word Documents 475
Ch. 18 Designing and Printing Professional-Looking Pages 509
Ch. 19 Using Word to Automate Mailings 553
Ch. 20 Creating Web Pages and Other Online Documents 571
Pt. 4 Excel 601
Ch. 21 Worksheet Construction Essentials 603
Ch. 22 Advanced Worksheet Editing 627
Ch. 23 Expert Formatting Techniques 649
Ch. 24 Power Organizing with Workbooks 683
Ch. 25 Customizing Excel to Work the Way You Do 711
Ch. 26 Crunching Numbers with Formulas and Functions 733
Ch. 27 Advanced Worksheet Charts 753
Ch. 28 Power Database Techniques: Lists, Filters, and Pivot Tables 777
Ch. 29 Advanced Business Analysis 807
Ch. 30 Expert Web Publishing and Querying Techniques 825
Pt. 5 PowerPoint 841
Ch. 31 Essential PowerPoint Techniques 843
Ch. 32 Advanced Presentation Formatting 875
Ch. 33 Mastering Tables, Graphics, and Drawings 897
Ch. 34 Adding Special Effects and Hyperlinks 919
Ch. 35 Setting Up and Presenting the Slide Show 935
Pt. 6 Outlook 965
Ch. 36 Outlook Fundamentals 967
Ch. 37 Working with Outlook Items and Folders 983
Ch. 38 Managing Messages and Appointments 1021
Ch. 39 Managing Contacts, Tasks, and Other Types of Information 1057
Ch. 40 Customizing Outlook 1089
Pt. 7 FrontPage 1107
Ch. 41 FrontPage Fundamentals 1109
Ch. 42 Managing Your Web Site with FrontPage 1127
Ch. 43 Creating and Editing Web Pages 1163
Ch. 44 Formatting Your Web Pages 1197
Ch. 45 Adding Advanced Features to Your Web Pages 1235
Pt. 8 Access 1257
Ch. 46 Access Fundamentals 1259
Ch. 47 Setting Up Tables and Relationships 1277
Ch. 48 Using Queries to Select and Combine Information 1311
Ch. 49 Creating Forms and Data Access Pages for Working with Data 1333
Ch. 50 Generating Reports to Present Information 1361
Pt. 9 Publisher 1377
Ch. 51 Essential Publisher Techniques 1379
Ch. 52 Creating Professional Brochures and Newsletters 1411
Ch. 53 Advanced Web Publications 1439
Pt. 10 Supercharging Office XP with Macros and VBA 1461
Ch. 54 Building Your First Office XP Macro 1463
Ch. 55 Using Variables, Operators, and Functions to Manage Information 1483
Ch. 56 Adding Logic and Computing Power with Control Structures 1505
Ch. 57 Using Toolbox Controls to Create a User Interface 1521
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First Chapter

Chapter 1.|An Office XP Overview
  • A Rundown on Office XP
    • Advantages of the Office XP Suite
  • An Office XP Map
  • What’s New in Office XP
    • New Common Office XP Features
    • New Word Features
    • New Excel Features
    • New PowerPoint Features
    • New Outlook Features
    • New FrontPage Features
    • New Access Features
    • New Publisher Features

Chapter 1 An Office XP Overview

A Rundown on Office XP

The Microsoft Office XP suite provides more applications and utility programs than ever before. Which ones you have depends upon which edition of Office XP you own or which individual Office applications you’ve obtained. This book covers all the major Office XP applications:

  • Microsoft Word (Part 3)
  • Microsoft Excel (Part 4)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint (Part 5)
  • Microsoft Outlook (Part 6)
  • Microsoft FrontPage (Part 7)
  • Microsoft Access (Part 8)
  • Microsoft Publisher (Part 9)

The book also covers many of the valuable utility programs and add-ons that are included with Office XP (or are available on the Web) and that help you work with the main applications:

  • Office Shortcut Bar (Chapter 4)
  • newfeature! Clip Organizer (Chapter 6). See Figure 1-1 on page 4.
  • Microsoft Graph (Chapter 6)
  • Microsoft Equation (Chapter 6)
  • Save My Settings Wizard (Chapter 9)
  • Office Resource Kit, including the CustomInstallation Wizard (Chapter 2)

Figure 1-1. You can run the new Clip Organizer program in its own window, shown here, or through the new Insert Clip Art task pane. (Image Unavailable)

Even if you don’t have one or more of the applications covered in this book, you might want to read some of the information about these applications to help you decide whether to add an Office program to your software collection or whether you’re better off using the applications you already have.

Advantages of the Office XP Suite

Obtaining and installing the Office XP application suite, rather than acquiring individual applications here and there, isn’t just a way to economize by buying programs "cheaper by the dozen." The real advantages of a software suite such as Office XP lie in the common user interface and the application integration features.

In Office XP, the individual applications share more common features than in any previous Office version. An obvious advantage of a common user interface is that once you learn one application, it’s much easier to learn another. Also, as you switch between applications, you won’t have to switch working modes quite so radically. And, perhaps most important, a common user interface frees your focus from the individual applications and their idiosyncrasies and lets you concentrate on the documents you’re creating. The following are examples of important common features in the Office XP suite:

  • The menus, toolbars, shortcut keys, and the methods for customizing these features.
  • The common dialog boxes (notably, the Open and Save As dialog boxes), with shared features such as the Search command that now lets you find either files or Outlook items.
  • The task panes (described later in this chapter). See Figure 1-2.
  • Figure 1-2. The new Search task pane, which is available in most Office applications, lets you locate either disk files or Outlook items. (Image Unavailable)

  • The methods for displaying and setting document properties.
  • The speech and handwriting interfaces.
  • The drawing features (Drawing toolbar, AutoShapes, Diagrams, WordArt, and others). See Figure 1-3.
  • Figure 1-3. The new Diagram Gallery dialog box lets you quickly insert a variety of ready-made conceptual drawings. (Image Unavailable)

  • The proofing tools (Spelling, Thesaurus, AutoCorrect, and others).
  • The help interface and the Detect And Repair command.
  • The Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming features.
  • The ability to store and share documents on SharePoint team Web sites.

The Office XP applications are also more tightly integrated than ever. Application integration extends the usefulness of the individual applications. It lets you combine applications in a synergistic way to solve more complex problems and to easily accomplish otherwise difficult tasks. The following are examples of application integration features available in Office XP:

  • The Office Shortcut Bar, as well as the New Office Document and Open Office Document commands on the Start menu in Windows, which let you create or open any type of Office document
  • The ability of Office applications to import and export each other’s documents (using the Open and Save As dialog boxes, as well as special purpose commands for importing and exporting documents or data)
  • The capability of using data stored in Outlook or Access when creating mail-merge documents in Word
  • Commands for linking and embedding data from several Office applications in a single compound document
  • VBA, the common programming language of the Office applications and the most powerful way to create solutions using multiple Office applications

An Office XP Map

If you’re not sure where to start with Office, you can use Table 1-1 to select the best Office application to use for creating the type of document you want or for performing the task you need to complete.


NOTE:
For a more detailed rundown on an Office XP application, see the first chapter in the part of the book that covers that application.

Table 1-1. The Best Office XP Application to Use for Performing Specific Tasks

Office XP Application to Use Task
Word
  • Create general printed or online documents of all kinds—for example, memos, letters, faxes, reports, contracts, résumés, manuals, theses, and books.
  • Enter and organize research notes, outlines, and other types of free-form text information.
  • Generate form letters, envelopes, labels, and other mail-merge documents (see Figure 1-4, on page 9).
  • Print individual labels and envelopes.
  • Create general-purpose, relatively simple Web pages, which can include almost any Word document element, plus movies, sounds, forms, frames, visual themes, navigation bars, and components for accessing information on a SharePoint team Web site. Use templates to create personal Web pages and other types of pages or use the Web Page Wizard to create simple Web sites.
Excel
  • Save, organize, calculate, analyze, and chart numeric business or personal data in a spreadsheet (row and column) format. For example, balance checking accounts, prepare invoices, plan budgets, track orders, or maintain general accounting ledgers.
  • Store relatively simple text or numeric data in lists that organize the information into records (rows) and fields (columns)—for example, a product inventory or descriptions of members of your ski racing team. Sort, find, filter, automatically fill, summarize, group, outline, or subtotal data. Display data in varying combinations using pivot tables or pivot charts.
  • Publish static or interactive spreadsheets, charts, or pivot tables, for displaying numeric, text, or graphic information on the Web. Publish forms on the Web for collecting data in lists or other databases.
PowerPoint
  • Create multimedia presentations consisting of sets of slides to teach, sell, communicate, or persuade. Include text, graphics, animations, sound, and video in your presentations. Present multimedia infor-mation using 35 mm slides, transparencies for overhead projectors, speaker notes, printed handouts, or live slide shows on a computer or computer projector.
  • Publish presentations on the Web that consist of a series of multimedia slides displaying text, graphics, animations, sounds, or videos.
Outlook
  • Send, receive, and organize e-mail messages. Exchange instant Internet messages.
  • Store and manage personal information (appointments, names and addresses, to-do lists, journal entries, or free-form notes).
  • Communicate and coordinate with members of your workgroup (schedule meetings, manage group projects, and share information and files).
  • Access files on local or network disks and explore Web sites.
  • Publish snapshots of your calendar on the Web.
FrontPage
  • Create entire Web sites using templates or wizards—such as a site for establishing a corporate presence, displaying personal information, conducting an online discussion, managing a project, or accessing shared information stored on a SharePoint team Web site (see Figure 1-5). Use visual themes to apply consistent formatting to all pages in your site.
  • Manage your Web site (maintain files and folders, display reports, create and update hyperlinks, track tasks, publish your site, or control the source in workgroups).
  • Create a Web page quickly using a template or wizard (for example, a page containing a bibliography, a feedback form, or a table of contents).
  • Create or edit a Web page using a full-featured HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) editor, which supports all standard Web page elements and provides ready-to-use Web-page components (date and time stamps, comments, hover buttons and other dynamic effects, forms for searching the site, spreadsheets and charts, hit counters, galleries of photos, included files, link bars, tables of contents, site usage statistics, views of information stored on a SharePoint team Web site, and controls that display information from Web sites such as MSN).
Access
  • Store, organize, select, and present data in a relational database, which allows you to easily manage large amounts of complex or interrelated data and to divide data into separate, related tables to maximize storage efficiency.
  • Publish an interactive form on an intranet that allows users to view or update information from a database.
Publisher
  • Use wizards to create brochures, flyers, signs, greeting cards, business cards, menus, catalogs, newsletters, and other relatively short documents that have precise page layouts integrating text and graphics.
  • Create coordinated sets of publications (business cards, letterheads, envelopes, fax cover sheets, and so on).
  • Use wizards to create graphical Web pages.

Figure 1-4. Word’s new Mail Merge task pane makes it easy to create and print form letters, envelopes, labels, and other mail-merge documents. (Image Unavailable)

Figure 1-5. In FrontPage you can create a new team Web site on a Web server running SharePoint Team Services from Microsoft. This figure shows the home page of a newly created team site. (Image Unavailable)

What’s New in Office XP

The following sections briefly describe many of the new features and enhancements found in Office XP. (Office XP has so many new features and enhancements that it would be difficult to list them all!)

New Common Office XP Features

Each of the following new features is available in most—or many—of the main Office XP applications.

  • Task panes In Office applications you can now carry out certain operations or choose selected options using a new alternative to a dialog box known as a task pane. A task pane is a Web-style command area that you can dock along the right or left edge of the window or float anywhere on the screen. Most Office applications provide the following common task panes: New Document (the name varies with the specific application), Clipboard, and Search. (For examples of task panes, see Figures 1-2, on page 5, and 1-4, on page 9.)
  • Search feature Office XP includes a new search feature that you can use to locate files on local disks, network drives, or Web sites or to find items in Outlook folders. You can run the search feature in the Search task pane (see Figure 1-2, on page 5), or in a dialog box that you display from the Open or Open Office Document dialog box.
  • Document recovery Office XP provides many new features to help you recover your data in the event of a program crash. For example, Office applications attempt to save your document when a crash occurs, and, on restarting, provide a Document Recovery task pane to help you restore your document. Also, you can use the new Office Application Recovery utility to break into a hung application so it can save your data. And you can use the Open And Repair option in the Open dialog box to attempt to repair a corrupted document.
  • Speech recognition In Office XP applications you can now dictate text rather than type it, and you can issue basic commands by speaking them rather than by using the mouse or keyboard.
  • Handwriting interface Office XP applications now let you enter text into a document using an electronic tablet and pen or (with difficulty) an ordinary mouse. You can either insert handwritten characters (such as your signature), or you can have Office recognize your handwritten characters and convert them to regular text.
  • Smart tags Office XP applications can now recognize a wide range of different data types entered into a document (such as names, dates, addresses, and stock ticker symbols). The application converts each recognized piece of data into a smart tag, and you can then use a menu attached to the smart tag to perform useful actions on that data, automatically invoking the required Windows program.
  • AutoCorrect Options button After the Office AutoCorrect feature makes a change, you can modify the correction using the new AutoCorrect Options button.
  • Paste Options button When you paste data into an Office XP document, a Paste Options button appears, allowing you to select the desired format of the pasted data and to switch among different formats to determine the one you want.
  • XML (Extensible Markup Language) support Excel and Access 2002 can now import and export data from and to XML documents. Also, you can have FrontPage 2002 apply XML formatting rules when generating the HTML source for the Web pages you create.
  • Diagrams In Office XP applications you can now get a head start in building a conceptual drawing—such as an organization chart or a Venn diagram—by inserting a ready-made Office diagram. (See Figure 1-3, on page 5.)
  • Windows in Taskbar option You can now display documents in top-level windows with buttons in the Windows Taskbar (as in Office 2000), or you can display them in child windows within a single top-level application window without displaying a toolbar button for each document window (as in Office 97 and earlier).
  • New From Existing command You can now create a new document based on an existing document as an alternative to using a template.
  • SharePoint access In Office XP applications you can now open or save documents stored on a SharePoint team Web site, you can participate in online discussions hosted by the site, and in some types of Office documents you can insert Web components that allow you to view and modify shared information stored on a team site. (A team Web site is hosted by a Web server that runs SharePoint Team Services, and it provides collaboration features that allow workgroups to share documents and exchange information. See Figure 1-5, on page 9.)

New Word Features

  • New formatting features Word 2002 now saves and lets you reapply directly assigned formatting features as an alternative to using styles. In addition to character and paragraph styles, Word provides table and list styles for applying predefined formatting features to tables and to multilevel lists. To find out what formatting and style (or styles) have been applied to characters in your document, you can use the new Reveal Formatting task pane. To remove all formatting from text, you can use the new Clear Formatting command. To find text that’s inconsistently formatted with the rest of the document, you can use Word’s new formatting consistency checker. To select all text that has the same style or saved format as the current selection, you can use the new Select All command. And you can simultaneously select multiple blocks of text or graphics in a document so that you can format or edit all of them at once.
  • Change tracking The change tracking feature has been completely revamped—for example, you can have Word mark changes using margin balloons without disturbing the line and page breaks in the document.
  • Comments In Word 2002, comments have also been extensively redesigned—for instance, you can have Word display comment text in margin balloons, making it easy to insert, view, or edit the comment text.
  • Document security Document security has been enhanced—for example, the Options dialog box provides a new Security tab, and you can attach a digital signature to a document.
  • Document statistics You can display the number of words, characters, lines, pages, or paragraphs in the current document using the new Word Count toolbar.
  • Text translation You can use Word’s new Translate task pane to translate into a different language either a word, or—by means of a translation service on the Web—a phrase, a block of text, or an entire document.
  • Watermarks Word’s new Printed Watermark command makes it easy to add a document watermark, which consists of faint text or graphics displayed across every page in the document or in a document section.
  • Booklet printing Word provides new page setup and printing options that make it easy to directly print a booklet or even a book.
  • Mail Merge Wizard Word’s new Mail Merge Wizard, which runs in the Mail Merge task pane, makes it easy to create form letters, envelopes, labels and other mail-merge documents. (See Figure 1-4, on page 9.)
  • New Web page formats Word now lets you save a Web page in the Web Archive (*.mht, *.mhtml) format, which saves everything in a single Web archive file. You can also filter a Web page when you save it, which generates a smaller and "cleaner" HTML file by preserving only the essential document information (but with the possible loss of document features).

New Excel Features

  • Unlocking data A number of new tools make it easier to find, analyze, and publish data associated with worksheets in Excel 2002. Web queries make it easier to link to data on the Web. Web Page AutoRepublish automatically keeps Web pages in sync every time you save your document. Copy Paste Web Query automatically links to data on the Web when you paste it from a Web page. Import Data allows you to easily find and share data sources.
  • Improved pivot tables Pivot tables have been improved with drop-down menus and other user interface enhancements. The automatic GetPivotData formula streamlines the analysis of pivot table data.
  • Access to more data Excel 2002 works with more data types, including common data sources on the Web. XML is supported as a data interchange format, and worksheets can be linked directly to XML data on the Web. The new real-time data (RTD) function brings real-time data into Excel for analysis.
  • Command and feature enhancements Numerous menu command and product feature enhancements make Excel even easier to use in fundamental areas, including link management, Find and Replace searches, hyperlink navigation, sorting, drawing borders, inserting international number formats, editing cells vertically, error checking, and customizing headers and footers with graphics and additional information. The IntelliPrint feature eliminates the printing of blank pages, an enhancement designed to conserve your printing and paper resources.

New PowerPoint Features

  • Collaboration Several tools make it easier to edit and review PowerPoint 2002 presentations in workgroup environments. You can now save presentations with password protection, so that reviewers can view presentations in PowerPoint but not edit or save them. Web broadcasting is now easier to use. Authors can now attach digital signatures to their presentations to increase security and reviewer confidence. Presentation review cycles in workgroups have been made easier through routing and reconciliation features, which manage change requests from multiple reviewers. Comments have been revised so that in addition to allowing reviewers the chance to insert "hidden" notes in presentations, they can be compared to one another, merged together, and printed in a new way.
  • Animation You can now apply a combination of animation and transition schemes to your whole presentation at once—a significant time saver. New slide transition effects include Comb, Fade Smoothly, Newsflash, Push, Shape, Wedge, and Wheel. Custom animation effects are easier and more impressive now that PowerPoint lets you control exit animations, path animations, and timed/simultaneous animations.
  • Everyday tasks made easy The Copy and Paste commands are better able to handle inserting different content types and a larger volume of information. Print Preview allows you to determine how a presentation prints and lets you make fine-tuning adjustments. Slide formatting is easier with "one-click" formatting. You can apply more than one design template to the same presentation. Thumbnail views of your slides are now available in Normal View.

New Outlook Features

  • Single configuration Outlook 2002 no longer has the separate Corporate Or Workgroup and Internet Only configurations. The features of both these configurations are combined in a unified configuration.
  • Enhanced Preview pane If you select an item in the Calendar, Contacts, or Journal folder, the Preview pane now displays the item within its form (that is, within the form used to display the item when you open it).
  • Outlook item search You can search for Outlook items, as well as disk files, by using the new Search task pane in Office applications. (See Figure 1-2, on page 5.)
  • Account groups If you have more than one e-mail account, you can now set up account groups to control exactly which accounts Outlook uses to send and receive e-mail when you initiate a send and receive operation and also to have Outlook automatically send and receive e-mail at fixed intervals using specific accounts.
  • Easier management of e-mail headers Outlook provides an easier interface for downloading and screening e-mail message headers before you download the full content of your messages.
  • Mailbox Cleanup You can use the new Mailbox Cleanup dialog box to weed out messages when your Inbox starts growing out of control.
  • Appointment color coding You can now tag your appointments using colors—for example, red for an important appointment, blue for a business appointment, green for a personal appointment, and so on.
  • Alternative meeting times When you use Outlook to plan a meeting, an attendee can now reply by proposing a new meeting time, rather than simply accepting or declining the invitation.
  • Enhanced meeting planner You can now consult the meeting planner whenever the Calendar folder is open, without actually scheduling a meeting.
  • Unified Reminders dialog box All pending appointment reminders are now displayed in a single Reminders dialog box, so you don’t have to view and close a separate dialog box for each one.
  • Instant Messaging You can now use Instant Messaging to communicate from Outlook in real time.
  • Address Bar You can use the new Address Bar to explore Web pages within the Outlook window.

New FrontPage Features

  • Customization of SharePoint Web sites You can now create or customize a SharePoint team Web site. You can add new custom document libraries, surveys, and other types of lists to a team site. You can view team site usage statistics. You can add a Document Library View or List View Web component to a page, which allows you to view the contents of a document library or a list on a team site. And you can create a custom form for adding, editing, or displaying items in a document library or other type of team site list. (See Figure 1-5, on page 9.)
  • Navigation pane You can view a web’s navigation structure in Page view by opening the new Navigation pane.
  • Report publishing You can now copy a web report to a Web page, so that you can publish the report on the Web.
  • Enhanced Web publishing The Web publishing feature has been completely revamped. For instance, you can publish individual files that belong to a web. And when you publish, the Web Publish dialog box letsyou select exactly which files to publish and enables you to manage files in the local web as well as files on the destination server (you can cut, copy, paste, rename, or delete files, or copy files between the source and the destination).
  • Tabs in Page view You can now quickly switch between pages opened in Page view by clicking the tabs at the top of the window.
  • Language formatting You can now mark foreign text contained in a Web page so that Outlook uses the correct dictionary for checking its spelling and looking up synonyms.
  • Added graphics features You can now quickly add and arrange a collection of images by inserting a Photo Gallery Web component. You can create drawings within FrontPage using AutoShapes and the Drawing toolbar. And you can add decorative text by inserting a WordArt object.
  • Automatic table fill If you’ve added text to one table cell, you can now have FrontPage automatically copy that text to other cells.
  • Enhanced shared borders You can now assign a separate background color or picture to an individual shared border as well as to the main part of a page.
  • Collapsible outlines You can now convert a simple list to a multilevel outline that the page visitor can collapse or expand.
  • Inline frames As an alternative to creating a frames page to view multiple pages, you can now insert an inline frame, which is a rectangular element that displays another page and lets you scroll through it.
  • New Web components FrontPage provides new Web components, including new types of custom link bars, components that let you display information from the MSN or MSNBC Web sites, and components for SharePoint team Web sites (mentioned previously in this list). You can also download additional Web components from the Web.

New Access Features

  • New database format Access 2002 provides a new database file format that offers better performance for larger databases. You can open and save databases in either the old format or the new one, and you can easily convert databases between formats.
  • Enhanced spelling checker You can modify the way the spelling checker works by using the new Spelling tab in the Options dialog box.
  • Convert objects to data access pages You can now convert a table, query, form, or report to a data access page.
  • XML support You can now import or export data from or to XML documents.

New Publisher Features

  • Prepress preparation Publisher 2002 offers enhanced commercial printing functionality, including support for up to 12 "spot colors" in a single publication and the ability to combine process and spot colors in the same publication. Publisher also includes a new version of the EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) filter, which provides improved handling and previews of text, as well as improved handling of named colors to properly separate EPS graphics in spot-color publications.
  • Common features and improvements Font schemes make it easy to give your publication a new look. Choose one of 25 coordinated font sets, and it will be consistently applied to your publication. Publisher now makes it easy to prepare Word documents with great-looking professional designs by using the Word Import Wizard. Fifteen new Design Sets aimed at producing streamlined, professional-quality business publications have been added to Publisher. Many Publisher features—wizards, designs, and color schemes—have been redesigned for easy access in the task pane. Publisher includes a style inspector that describes the properties of the current style, allowing you to make better use of styles. Now you can save and open documents in HTML file format. The new mail-merge feature in Publisher is more like mail merge in Word, making it easier to use.
  • Drawing tool Publisher 2002 uses the same drawing tools, including AutoShapes, used by other Office applications. You can now move objects inline with text in text frames. Once moved inline, graphics flow with text in frames. Publisher now supports cyan-magenta-yellow-black (CMYK) TIFFs internally. You’re no longer required to link to externally stored TIFFs. Publisher can separate vector and bitmap red-green-blue (RGB) images. Publisher supports print previews of the current publication, using the characteristics of the current printer to render the preview. If you’re using either process or spot color, print preview can display both a composite preview and previews of individual ink plates. Printing is easier now that the Print Setup and Page Setup dialog boxes have been merged into a single dialog box.
  • International support Publisher 2002 now includes support for complex scripts and bidirectional languages, such as Arabic and Hebrew. Publisher uses Office "word-breaking" technology to detect word breaks in Japanese and Chinese text for easy selection and editing of your text. Publisher now supports the Office Language Settings tool to let users enable language-specific editing features and the language used in online Help.
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2003

    Microsoft Office XP Inside Out

    Anyone who has seen any of the Microsoft Office programs will find this book as a sterling gateway to experience the Microsoft Office programs. Each topic is so explicit that beginners will be led into private lessons without pausing from reading them except to try the techniques on the computer. The lessons are so well detailed that anyone who has nil experience with Microsoft Office can capture the lessons with ease. Also, I am pleased that Microsoft Office XP Inside Out is one of the few books that encompasses all the programs including Publisher. The only disadvantage of the book is its soft cover. A hard cover would be commensurate with such authoritative publishing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2001

    Get this one

    Many books are a waste of my time. This is not the case with this book. If you want to cut straight to learning without all the hipe, then Inside Out is for you. If you are looking for one book to get you up and running with Microsoft's latest version of Office, this is the one. Warning: There is a lot to this book. Once you start, it's hard to put down. I've spent a lot of late nights having fun learning all the new things in Office XP.

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