Microsoft Outlook 97 For Windows For Dummies Quick Reference

Overview

To get a real productivity boost from Outlook, you need Microsoft Outlook 97 For Windows For Dummies Quick Reference. With this handy, concise guide, you won't waste time looking up how to use the many powerful features built into Microsoft's multifaceted scheduler, contact manager, and communications program. The perfect on-the-road companion to the in-depth Microsoft Outlook 97 For Windows For Dummies provides practical tips so that you can take advantage of the Outlook program's capabilities for workgroup ...
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Overview

To get a real productivity boost from Outlook, you need Microsoft Outlook 97 For Windows For Dummies Quick Reference. With this handy, concise guide, you won't waste time looking up how to use the many powerful features built into Microsoft's multifaceted scheduler, contact manager, and communications program. The perfect on-the-road companion to the in-depth Microsoft Outlook 97 For Windows For Dummies provides practical tips so that you can take advantage of the Outlook program's capabilities for workgroup collaboration, task and contact management, calendar maintenance, exchanging e-mail, instant note taking, and journaling.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764501845
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/13/1997
  • Series: For Dummies Quick Reference Series
  • Edition description: SPIRAL
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 202
  • Product dimensions: 5.79 (w) x 8.37 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill Dyszel writes frequently for leading magazines, including PC Magazine, Success Magazine, Chief Executive Magazine, and Computer Shopper, while also working as a consultant to many of New York's leading firms in the securities, advertising, and publishing industries. His list of current and former clients includes Salomon Brothers, First Boston, Goldman Sachs, Ogilvy & Mather, KMPG Peat Marwick, and many others. An award-winning public speaker, he enjoys entertaining audiences with talks about the pleasures and pitfalls of using modern technology. He is also the author of PalmPilot For Dummies.
The world of high technology has led Mr. Dyszel to grapple with such subjects as Multimedia (or how to make your $2,000 computer do the work of a $20 radio), Personal Information Managers (how to make your $3,000 laptop computer do the work of a $3.00 date book), and graphics programs (how to make your $5,000 package of computers and peripheral devices do the work of a 50-cent box of crayons). All joking aside, he has found that after you figure out the process, most of this stuff can be useful, helpful, and yes, even cool.
Like many public figures with skeletons in their closets, this author has a secret past. Before entering the computer industry, Mr. Dyszel sang with the New York City Opera and worked regularly on the New York stage as a singer, actor, and writer in numerous plays, musicals, and operas. His opera spoof -- 99% ARTFREE!--won critical praise from The New York Times, New York Daily News, and the Associated Press when he performed the show Off-Broadway.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: How to Use This Book.
How This Book Is Organized.
What's in This Book.
Part I: All About Outlook.
Part II: E-Mail.
Part III: The Calendar.
Part IV: Tasks.
Part V: Contacts.
Pat VI: Notes & Journal.
Part VII: Files and Folders.
Conventions Used in This Book.
What the Pictures Mean.
Other Stuff.
PART I: ALL ABOUT OUTLOOK.
About the Screen.
The Outlook Bar.
The Folder Banner.
The Folder List.
The Information Viewer.
Menus.
On-screen forms.
Status Bar.
Toolbars.
Contact records created from e-mail messages.
E-mail messages created from appointments.
E-mail messages created from your Contact list.
Files sent by e-mail.
Journal entries created from a Contact record.
Text exchange with other Windows programs.
Undeleting deleted items.
Public Folders.
Some other features of Microsoft Exchange Server.
Introducing Office Assistant.
Making Outlook talk to Word.
Making Outlook work with PowerPoint.
Add an icon to the Outlook Bar.
AutoArchive.
Outlook data files.
Specialized Applications.
Downloading specialized applications.
Installing applications into Outlook.
Using the Diary.
Using Expense Reports.
Using the Recipes application.
Using the Vacation Request Form.
PART II: E-MAIL.
About the Inbox Screen.
Accessing your Inbox.
Opening the Message Form.
Attaching files to your messages.
Indicating message importance.
Formatting message text.
Marking messages Personal, Private, or Confidential.
Saving copies of your message.
Spell checking.
Using a template.
Sending a reply.
Deleting a message.
Flagging your e-mail messages as a reminder.
Forwarding a message.
Marking messages as Read or Unread.
Previewing unread messages.
Saving a message as a file.
Setting options for replies.
Tagging replies with your name.
Using the Rules Wizard.
Creating a folder.
Moving messages to another folder.
Using the Sent Items folder.
Accessing the Outbox.
Checking for new mail.
Creating Personal Distribution Lists.
Marking Remote Mail.
Reading attachments.
Sending messages.
Setting up online services.
Printing an individual message.
Printing a list of messages.
Choosing a view.
Installing and using the 3-pane viewer.
PART III: THE CALENDAR.
About Calendar.
Creating a recurring appointment.
Editing a recurring appointment.
About the Print dialog box.
About Print Styles.
Basic printing.
Creating a Billfold-calendar.
Planner-sized printing.
Wall calendar printing.
Changing an appointment using drag and drop.
Reopening the appointment to change it.
Shortening or lengthening an appointment.
Shortening appointments to less than 30 minutes.
Viewing Appointments.
Basic Calendar views.
Customizing the TaskPad.
Resizing parts of the Day/Week/Month view.
PART IV: TASKS.
Creating and Modifying Tasks.
Creating a task the quick, simple way.
Creating a task the slow, complete way.
Modifying a task the quick, simple way.
Modifying a task the slow, complete way.
Creating Recurring Tasks.
Creating Regenerating Tasks.
Linking a Task to a Document or Other Item.
Managing Tasks.
Copying a task.
Deleting a task.
Marking a task complete.
Marking several tasks complete.
Sending a task to someone else.
Setting the color of overdue or completed tasks.
Skipping a recurring task once.
Viewing and Printing Tasks.
Choosing a view.
Printing a single task.
Printing a view>
PART V: CONTACTS.
Adding Names, Numbers, and Other Stuff.
Adding a name the quick, simple way.
Adding a name the slow, complete way.
AutoDialing.
Changing contact information.
Finding a contact the quick, simple way.
Finding a contact using the Find Items tool.
About views.
Choosing a view.
Filtering views.
Putting new fields in a view.
Rearranging views.
Saving and deleting created views.
Sorting a view the quick, simple way.
Sorting a view the slow, complete way.
Using grouped views.
Using your own groups with the Group By box.
Printing Address Cards views.
Printing from Table views.
PART VI: NOTES AND JOURNAL.
Notes.
Creating notes.
Deleting a note.
Designating categories for your Notes.
Editing or reading a note.
Finding a note.
Forwarding a note.
Modifying the size of a note.
Modifying your note's color.
Printing a list of your notes.
Printing the contents of a single note.
Setting the default color and size of your notes.
Turning off the date and time display.
Viewing Notes.
Journal.
Activating the automatic recording feature.
Creating Journal entries manually with drag and drop.
Creating Journal entries with the New Journal item tool.
Creating a Journal entry for a non-Microsoft document.
Finding a Journal entry.
Printing your Journal.
Seeing Journal entries for a contact.
Viewing the Journal.
Viewing a specific date in your Journal.
PART VII: FILES AND FOLDERS.
Basics of Files and Folders.
About files, folders, and drives.
Looking at drives.
Looking at folder lists.
Looking at lists of your files.
Choosing files.
Copying and moving files.
Deleting files.
Renaming files.
Renaming folders.
About views.
Choosing a view.
Copying a list of filenames to use in another program.
Formatting columns.
Printing a list of files.
Rearranging columns.
Sorting files the quick, simple way.
Sorting files the slow, complete way.
Using grouped views.
Get the best fit.
Go up one level.
Navigate with browser buttons.
Glossary: Techie Talk.
Index.
Registration Card.
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First Chapter

Part 1
All About Outlook

(The online version of this Part has been abridged.)

Outlook offers you a lot more than would fit in this itty-bitty volume. I'm going to stick to the important stuff, so you can leap right in and start making Outlook a valuable tool in your daily work.

The Outlook functions that are immediately useful are the Personal Information Management features. These features show up as soon as you start the program. Microsoft cleverly designed Outlook to enable you to program and customize it to do almost anything you want that involves managing data. Some of the tasks that Outlook plans to do for you in the future are still a gleam in some programmer's eye, such as storing voice mail messages and advanced fax services. In the meantime, I focus on what Outlook offers here and now.

In this part . . .

  • About the screen
  • Drag and drop
  • Microsoft Exchange Server
  • Office 97 and Outlook
  • Options
  • Specialized applications



About the Screen

When you start Outlook you see a screen within a screen. The area along the top edge and the left side of the screen offers you a collection of menus and icons. These menus and icons enable you to control what you see and what you make happen in the remainder of the screen. The different parts of the Outlook screen have names:

The Outlook Bar

Running along the left side of the Outlook screen is the Outlook Bar. The Outlook Bar contains large, clearly marked icons for each of the Outlook modules: Inbox, Calendar, Contacts, Tasks, Journal, Notes, and Deleted Items. You can click any icon at any time to switch to a different module and then switch back, just like changing channels on your TV.

The Outlook Bar also has three gray separator bars, named Outlook, Mail, and Other. You can click these separator bars to switch to a different section of the Outlook Bar that has a different set of icons. You can add icons to any section of the Outlook Bar. You can also add sections to the bar itself by right-clicking the Outlook Bar. This action opens the shortcut menu enabling you to choose the appropriate command. (See "Customizing the Outlook Screen" later in this part.)

The Folder Banner

The Folder Banner is the name of the area that sits below the toolbars and above the main part of the Outlook screen (known as the Information Viewer). The name of the folder or module you're using is displayed in large letters at the left end of the Folder Banner. The right end of the banner displays a large icon. This icon is also used by the Outlook Bar to represent the module you're using.

Other information also turns up from time to time in the Folder Banner, for example:

  • The alphabetical section of the Contact list you're currently viewing
  • Whether you're using something called filtering, which enables you to limit the information displayed on the screen to items that meet certain criteria (see "Filtering" in Part V)
  • The Group By Box when you're using grouped views (see "Using grouped views" in Part V)

In addition, clicking the triangle next to the name of the module or folder on the left end of the Folder Banner reveals a temporary copy of the Folder List.

The Folder List

The Folder List gives you a quick peek behind the scenes at what's going on in Outlook. I leave the Folder List closed most of the time. However, if you're interested, here's what goes on behind the scenes.

Outlook organizes all the information you enter into folders. Each Outlook module has its own folder. Although you usually change modules by clicking the icon for that module in the Outlook Bar, you can also switch to a different module by clicking the folder for that module in the Folder List. Every Outlook module that has an icon in the Outlook Bar has a folder in the Folder List. But not every folder in the Folder List is represented by an icon in the Outlook Bar. Because you can have more folders in the Folder List than icons in the Outlook Bar, you may need to use the Folder List to go to a specific folder rather than click its icon in the Outlook Bar.

To open the Folder List, choose View-->Folder List from the menu or click the Folder List tool in the toolbar. The Folder List takes up so much space on the screen that I really can't do much work. That's why I leave it closed most of the time.

The Information Viewer

The biggest part of the Outlook screen, on the lower-right side, is the Information Viewer. Whatever you ask Outlook to show you shows up in the Information Viewer. Dates in your Calendar, messages in your Inbox, and names in your Contact list all appear in the Information Viewer.

You can drag items out of the Information Viewer to icons on the Outlook Bar to create new types of Outlook items from the information you already have (for more information, see "Drag and Drop," later in this part).

Menus

Like all Windows programs, Outlook has a menu bar across the top of the screen. Click your mouse on a menu name, such as File, Edit, or View to make a menu of commands appear. The underlined letter in a menu name is a hot key; holding the Alt key while pressing that letter does the same thing as clicking the mouse on the menu name.

As you change between Outlook modules, one of the menus -- called an Item-Specific menu -- changes its name to match the module. When you're in the Calendar, the menu is called Calendar; in Tasks, the name is Tasks, and so on. The Item-Specific menu contains commands that are useful only in the Outlook module you're using.

On-screen forms

Each time you either open an item or create a new item in Outlook, a form appears. This form either accepts the information you want to enter or contains the information at which you're looking -- or both. Each module has its own form, and each form has its own menus and toolbars.

You can also create your own forms with Outlook, or you can download new collections of forms from the Internet. For more about customizing Outlook forms, see Microsoft® OutlookTM For Dummies® by yours truly, published by IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.

Status Bar

The gray bar across the bottom of the Outlook screen is the Status Bar, which tells you how many items are currently displayed and very little else. Perhaps in the future the Status Bar will have more to say.

Toolbars

Toolbars offer a quicker way to control Outlook than clicking menus. The Outlook toolbar changes as you switch between different modules or views to offer you the most useful set of tools for the task you're doing at the moment. If you see a tool and want to know what it does, let your mouse pointer hover over the tool but don't click; a tool tip box appears revealing the name of the tool.

Drag and Drop

You can do a surprising amount of work without ever touching the keyboard. That little old mouse of yours can drag items from one part of Outlook and drop them off onto the icons in the Outlook Bar to create new items. When you drop an item between different Outlook modules, Outlook transforms the information and makes the item useful in a whole new way; an e-mail message can become a Contact item, a Contact item can become a Journal entry, and so on.

Contact records created from e-mail messages

If someone sends you an e-mail message, you have all the information you need to create a new Contact record and enter that person in your Contact list.

To create a new Contact record, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Inbox icon to see your current incoming messages.
  2. Click a message from a person whose name you want to add to your Contact list and drag it to the Contacts icon to open a New Contact Form.
  3. Enter whatever information you wish to enter other than the e-mail address (which is already there) in the appropriate text boxes (see Part V for more information).
  4. Click Save and Close (or press Alt+S).

A new contact is now part of your Contact list. Although you can drag any type of item to the Contacts icon, e-mail messages are the only items that make sense to drag there. Doing so saves you time by providing information that you need in a Contact record anyway.

E-mail messages created from appointments

You can send an e-mail message informing someone of an existing appointment or inviting someone to attend. The person to whom you're sending the message gets an e-mail message, with the particulars of the appointment serving as the body of the message.

To send an e-mail message with information about an appointment, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Calendar icon to open your list of appointments.
  2. Drag an appointment to the Inbox icon to open a New Message Form with details of the appointment filled in.
  3. Fill in the e-mail address of the person to whom you wish to send notice of the appointment, as well as any other information you want to include (see Part III for more about appointments).
  4. Click Send (or press Alt+S).

If you and anyone you're inviting to the meeting are using a computer connected to a network that uses Microsoft Exchange Server, you can click the Meeting Planner tab on the Appointment form to check their schedules before calling the meeting. If you're not using Exchange Server, e-mail is your best bet for inviting others to attend your meeting or appointment.

E-mail messages created from your Contact list

If you've already entered a person's e-mail address in your Contact list, you have all you need to create an e-mail message to that person.

  1. Click the Contacts icon to open the Contact list.
  2. Drag the name of the person to whom you're sending a message to the Inbox icon. A New Message Form opens with the contact's address already filled in.
  3. Enter whatever other information you wish in the appropriate text boxes (see Part II for more about e-mail).
  4. Click Send (or press Alt+S).

If you send your e-mail over an online service or the Internet, clicking Send only sends your message to the Outbox. To deliver your message to your recipient via your online service or Internet Service Provider, you have to press F5.

If you're on an office network using Exchange Server, clicking Send sends your message directly to the recipient.

Files sent by e-mail

After you create your prize-winning report or spreadsheet, you don't need to waste paper, stamps, or time printing and mailing your opus, just e-mail the file! Sending a file by e-mail is as easy as drag-and-drop. Remember, when you e-mail a file, the file reaches your recipient as an attachment to the e-mail message. (See Part II for more about e-mail.)

To send a file using e-mail, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Other group separator in the Outlook Bar to reveal a group of icons that includes the My Documents icon.
  2. Click the My Documents icon in the Outlook Bar to show the contents of the My Documents folder in the Information Viewer.
  3. Click the Outlook group separator in the Outlook Bar to return to the set of Outlook Bar icons that includes the Inbox icon.
  4. Select the file(s) you want to send (see Part VII). The files you select are highlighted in blue.
  5. Drag the file(s) you want to send to the Inbox icon to open a New Message Form with your file attached.
  6. Fill in the e-mail address and any other information you want to include with your message (see Part II for more about e-mail).
  7. Click Send (or press Alt+S).

Your file is now sent to your recipient if you're on a network with Microsoft Exchange, or to your Outbox if you use online services. Online service users need to press F5 to move mail from the Outbox to their online services and on to the recipient.

Even though dragging a file to the Inbox is pretty easy, even easier ways exist to send a file by e-mail. You can right-click a filename to open a shortcut menu and choose Send to-->Mail Recipient Using Microsoft Outlook.

Journal entries created from a Contact record

You can create a Journal entry from any name in your Contact list. Use drag-and-drop to create a Journal entry with a link to the contact. Drag-and-drop goes beyond saving you the effort of entering contact information in the New Journal Entry Form. You can hop right to the Contact record from the Journal entry to find the contact's address, phone number, or other information.

To find a Contact record from a Journal entry, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Contacts icon to open the Contact list.
  2. Drag the name of the contact from the Contact list to the Journal icon in the Outlook Bar to open a New Journal Entry Form.
  3. Choose the type of Journal entry from the Entry type list box. You can make a Journal entry for a letter, conversation, phone call, e-mail, or any of the 20-odd choices available in the Entry type list box. I like to make Journal entries of incoming phone calls.
  4. Fill in any other information in the appropriate text box.
  5. Click Save and Close (or press Alt+S).

Your new entry is recorded in the Journal.

You can set up Outlook to make automatic Journal entries for new documents, e-mail messages, and AutoDialed phone calls. This automatic entry means that you don't need to create additional Journal entries for those events (see Part VI for more about the Journal).

Text exchange with other Windows programs

I like to save snippets from various documents and Web pages to my collection of notes for later reference. The process of dragging text from other applications is easier to do than to explain, so bear with me.

To save text from other applications, follow these steps:

  1. Select the information you want to save by dragging your mouse over the desired text. Your text is highlighted to show what you've selected.
  2. Hold the Ctrl key while dragging the information from the original program down to the Outlook icon on the Windows 95 Taskbar at the bottom of the screen. (The Outlook icon says Inbox, Notes, or whatever Outlook module you're using at the time.)
  3. Hold the mouse on the Outlook icon without releasing the mouse button for a second or so while Outlook appears.
  4. When Outlook appears, drag the mouse pointer over to the Notes icon (or any icon in the Outlook bar) and release the mouse button to see the note on your screen.
  5. When your text appears in a note, press Esc to close the note.

You can actually drag text to any Outlook module, but Notes is the most useful module to drag things into. In other modules, the text always ends up in the box at the bottom of the New Item Form. You can always select and drag text up from the box at the bottom of the form after you've captured the information in the form.

Undeleting deleted items

You can delete any Outlook item by dragging the item to the Deleted Items icon on the Outlook Bar. I won't go into detail about how to drag items to the deleted items folder.

Clicking the item you want to delete and clicking the Delete button on the toolbar or pressing Del on your keyboard is a whole bunch easier.

Undeleting items by dragging them out of the Deleted Items folder is just as simple and more useful when you have the need.

To undelete deleted items, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Deleted Items icon in the Outlook Bar to open the list of deleted items.
  2. Drag the deleted item that you want to restore back to the icon of the module from which the item came (contacts to the Contacts icon, tasks to the Tasks icon, and so on).

After you drag an item from the Deleted Items folder back to the folder from which it came, the item takes its place among all the other items in the folder as if it had never been deleted.

(The online version of this Part has been abridged.)

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