Microsoft Outlook Version 2002 Inside Out

Overview

Hey, you know your way around Outlook—so now dig into Version 2002 and really put your e-mail system to work! This supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format—it’s all muscle and no fluff. Discover the best and fastest ways to perform everyday tasks, and challenge yourself to new levels of Outlook mastery!

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Overview

Hey, you know your way around Outlook—so now dig into Version 2002 and really put your e-mail system to work! This supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and handy workarounds in concise, fast-answer format—it’s all muscle and no fluff. Discover the best and fastest ways to perform everyday tasks, and challenge yourself to new levels of Outlook mastery!

  • Build on what you already know about Outlook and quickly dive into what’s new
  • Automate routine tasks, such as backing up your mailbox
  • Organize, synchronize, and archive critical data
  • Customize Outlook—from templates and add-ins all the way to HTML
  • Integrate Outlook with Outlook Express and other Microsoft Office applications
  • Configure Outlook as a Microsoft Exchange Server client
  • Work off line or over the Internet
  • Set up and manage public folders
  • Support roaming and mobile users
  • Develop your own forms and apps using Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications and script

CD-ROM FEATURES:

  • Intuitive HTML interface
  • Extensive collection of Microsoft add-ins and third-party utilities, demos, and trials
  • Sample code to help you build your own VBA application
  • Complete eBook—easy to browse and print!
  • Sample chapters from other INSIDE OUT Office XP books
  • Web links to Microsoft Tools on the Web, online troubleshooters, and product support
  • Microsoft Visio customizable auto-demos
  • Interactive tutorials

For customers who purchase an ebook version of this title, instructions for downloading the CD files can be found in the ebook.

Complete in one volume, this book provides a thorough overview of the most-used features and functions of Microsoft's popular messaging and collaboration client. The book provides the information advanced users really need.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735612822
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 7/28/2001
  • Series: Microsoft Inside Out Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 1264
  • Product dimensions: 7.28 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 2.28 (d)

Meet the Author

Jim Boyce is a highly-regarded expert on operating systems and productivity software who's written or contributed to more than 50 books. A former contributing editor for Windows Magazine, Jim writes for several technical publications and Web sites.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Outlook Architecture, Setup, and Startup

This chapter provides an overview of Microsoft Outlook's architecture to help you learn not only how Outlook works but also how it stores data. Having that knowledge, particularly if you're charged with administering or supporting Outlook for other users, will help you use the application more effectively and address issues related to data storage and security, archiving, working offline, and moving data between installations.

This chapter also explains the different options you have for connecting to e-mail servers through Outlook and the protocols (POP3 and IMAP, for example) that support those connections. In addition to learning about client support and the various platforms on which you can use Outlook, you'll also learn about the options that are available for starting and using the program.

If you're anxious to get started using Outlook, you could skip this chapter and move straight to Chapter 2, "Advanced Setup Tasks," to learn how to configure your e-mail accounts and begin working with Outlook. However, this chapter provides the foundation on which many subsequent chapters are based, and reading it will help you gain a deeper understanding of what Outlook can do so that you can use it effectively and efficiently.

Overview of Outlook

In many respects, Outlook is a personal information manager (PIM). A traditional PIM lets you maintain information about your contacts, such as your customers, coworkers, and clients.

Traditional PIMs also let you keep track of your daily schedule, tasks to complete, and other personal or work-related information. Outlook does all that, but it goes well beyond the features of most PIMs to provide e-mail and fax support, group scheduling capability, and task management.

Outlook provides a broad range of capabilities to help you manage your entire work day. In fact, a growing number of Microsoft Office users work in Outlook more than 60 percent of the time. An understanding of Outlook's capabilities and features is important not only to using Office effectively but also to managing your time and projects. The following sections will help you learn to use the features in Outlook to simplify your work day and enhance your productivity.

Messaging

One of the key features Outlook offers is messaging. You can use Outlook as a client to send and receive e-mail through a variety of services. Outlook offers integrated support for the following e-mail services:

NOTE:

A client application is one that uses a service provided by another computer, typically a server.

Exchange Server Outlook provides full support for Microsoft Exchange Server, which means you can take advantage of workgroup scheduling, collaboration, instant messaging, and other features offered through Exchange Server that aren't available with other clients. For example, you can use any POP3 e-mail client, such as Outlook Express, to connect to an Exchange Server (assuming the Exchange Server is running an Internet Mail Connector), but you're limited to e-mail only. Advanced workgroup and other special features—being able to recall a message before it is read, use public folders, and vote, for example—require Outlook.

Internet e-mail Outlook provides full support for Internet e-mail servers, which means you can use Outlook to send and receive e-mail through mail servers that support Internet-based standards, such as POP3 and IMAP. What's more, you can integrate Internet mail accounts with other accounts, such as an Exchange Server account, to send and receive messages through multiple servers.

For example, you might maintain an account on your Exchange Server for interoffice correspondence and use a local Internet service provider (ISP), CompuServe, Bigfoot, or other Internet-based e–mail service for messages outside your network. Or perhaps you want to monitor your personal e-mail along with your work-related e-mail. In that situation, you would simply add your personal e-mail account to your Outlook profile and work with both simultaneously. You can use rules and custom folders to help separate your messages.

For more information about messaging protocols such as POP3 and IMAP, see "Understanding Messaging Protocols," page 18.

newfeature! HTTP-based e-mail Outlook 2002 supports HTTP-based e–mail services, such as Microsoft Hotmail. HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the protocol used to request and transmit Web pages. This means you can use Outlook to send and receive e-mail through Hotmail and other HTTP-based mail servers that would otherwise require you to use a Web browser to access your e-mail (see Figure 1-1). In addition, you can download your messages to your local inbox and process them offline, rather than remaining connected to your ISP while you process messages.

Another advantage is that you can keep your messages as long as you want—most HTTP-based messaging services, including Hotmail, purge read messages after a given period of time. Plus, HTTP support in Outlook lets you keep all your e-mail in a single application. Currently, Outlook 2002 directly supports Hotmail. Check with your e-mail service to determine whether your mail server is Outlook-compatible.

Figure 1-1. HTTP-based mail servers such as Hotmail have traditionally required access through a Web browser.

Fax send and receive Outlook 2002 includes a Fax Mail Transport provider, which allows you to send and receive faxes using a fax modem. The Fax Mail Transport included with Outlook provides Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) support so that incoming fax messages can be routed through your Outlook Inbox, with the MAPI-aware fax application handling the actual fax processing (send, receive, view, and so on). Most Microsoft platforms provide built-in fax capability, but actual support varies from one platform to another. In addition, third-party developers can provide MAPI integration with their fax applications, allowing you to use Outlook as the front end for those applications to send and receive faxes. Symantec's WinFax is a good example of such an application. The fax service in Microsoft Windows 2000 also supports MAPI and Inbox integration with Outlook and is the only Microsoft-supplied fax service supported by Microsoft for Outlook.

InsideOut:

Windows 2000 fax service is now the only fax support offered for Windows. Windows 9x users will need to purchase a third-party fax application such as WinFax.

For a detailed explanation of how to use Outlook to send and receive faxes (complete with cover pages and other details), see Chapter 9, "Sending and Receiving Faxes."

Extensible e-mail support Outlook's design allows developers to support third-party e-mail services in Outlook, such as cc:Mail and Lotus Notes. This support doesn't guarantee the availability of these third-party tools, however. For example, although earlier versions of Outlook included support for cc:Mail, Microsoft no longer offers its own service provider for support of cc:Mail.

InsideOut:

Outlook 2002 does not include the Microsoft Mail service provider. Microsoft no longer supports this product and customers who used this service will need to find another service provider.

Whatever your e-mail server type, Outlook provides a comprehensive set of tools for composing, receiving, and replying to messages. Outlook provides support for rich-text and HTML formatting, which allows you to create and receive messages that contain much more than just text (see Figure 1-2). For example, you can send a Web page as a mail message or integrate sound, video, and graphics in mail messages. Outlook's support for multiple address books, multiple e-mail accounts, and even multiple e-mail services makes it an excellent messaging client, even if you forgo the application's many other features and capabilities.

Scheduling

Scheduling is another important feature in Outlook. You can use Outlook to track both personal and work-related meetings and appointments (see Figure 1-3), whether at home or in the office, a useful feature even on a stand-alone computer.

Figure 1-2. Use Outlook to create rich-text and multimedia messages.

Figure 1-3. Track your personal and work schedules with Outlook.

newfeature! Where Outlook's scheduling capabilities really shine, however, is in group scheduling. When you use Outlook to set up meetings and appointments with others, you can view the schedules of your invitees, which makes it easy to find a time when everyone can attend. You can schedule both one-time and recurring appointments. All appointments and meetings can include a reminder with a lead time that you specify, and Outlook will notify you of the event at the specified time. A new feature in Outlook 2002 lets you process multiple reminders at one time, a useful feature if you've been out of the office for a while.

newfeature! Organizing your schedule is also one of Outlook's strong suits. You can use categories and types to categorize appointments, events, and meetings; to control the way they appear in Outlook; and to perform automatic processing. Color labels allow you to identify quickly and visually different types of events on your calendar.

In addition to managing your own schedule, you can delegate control of the schedule to someone else, such as your assistant. The assistant can modify your schedule, request meetings, respond to meeting invitations, and otherwise act on your behalf regarding your calendar. Not only can others view your schedule to plan meetings and appointments (with the exception of items marked personal), but you can also publish your schedule to the Web to allow others to view it over an intranet or the Internet (see Figure 1-4).

Figure 1-4. You can easily publish your schedule to the Web.

Contact Management

> Being able to manage contact information—names, addresses, and phone numbers—is critical to other aspects of Outlook, such as scheduling and messaging. Outlook makes it easy to manage contacts and offers flexibility in the type of information you maintain. In addition to basic information, you can also store a contact's fax number, cell phone number, pager number, Web page URL, and more (see Figure 1-5).

Figure 1-5. You can manage a wealth of information about each contact.

Besides using contact information to address e-mail messages, you can initiate phone calls using the contacts list, track calls to contacts in the journal, add notes for each contact, use the contacts list to create mail merge documents, and perform other tasks. The Contacts folder also provides a means for storing a contact's digital certificate, which you can use to exchange encrypted messages for security. Adding a contact's certificate is easy—just receive a digitally signed message from the contact and Outlook will add the certificate to the contact's entry. You can also import a certificate from a file provided by the contact.

For details about digital signatures and encryption, see "Encrypting Messages," page 354. For additional information on the journal, see "Tracking with Outlook's Journal," page 10. For complete details on how to use the journal, see Chapter 17, "Keeping a Journal."

Task Management

Managing your work day usually includes keeping track of the tasks you need to perform and assigning tasks to others. Outlook makes it easy to manage your task list. You assign a due date, start date, priority, category, and other properties to each task, which makes it easier for you to manage those tasks (see Figure 1-6). As with meetings and appointments, Outlook keeps you informed and on track by issuing reminders for each task. You control whether the reminder is used and the time and date it's generated, along with an optional, audible notification. You can designate a task as personal, preventing others from viewing the task in your schedule—just as you can with meetings and appointments. Tasks can be one-time or recurring.

Figure 1-6. Use Outlook to manage tasks.

If you manage others, Outlook makes it easy to assign tasks to other Outlook users. When you create a task, you simply click Assign Task, and Outlook prompts you for the assignee's e-mail address. You can choose to keep a copy of the updated task in your own task list and receive a status report when the task is complete.

Tracking with Outlook's Journal

Keeping track of events is an important part of managing your work day, and Outlook's journal makes it simple. The Journal folder allows you to keep track of the contacts you make (phone calls, e-mails, and so on), meeting actions, task requests and responses, and other actions for selected contacts (see Figure 1-7). You can also use the journal to track your work in other Microsoft Office applications, giving you a way to track the time you spend on various documents and their associated projects. You can have Outlook journal items automatically based on settings that you specify, and you can also add items manually to your journal.

Figure 1-7. Configure your journal using Outlook's options.

When you view the journal, you can double-click a journal entry to either open the entry or open the items referred to by the entry, depending on how you have configured the journal. You can also configure the journal to automatically archive items to the default archive folder or a folder you choose, or you can have Outlook regularly delete items from the journal, cleaning out items that are older than a specified length of time. Outlook can use group policies to control the retention of journal entries, allowing a system administrator to manage journaling and data retention consistently throughout an organization.

Organizing Your Thoughts with Notes

With Outlook, you can keep track of your thoughts and tasks by using the Notes folder. Each note can function as a stand-alone window, allowing you to view notes on your desktop outside Outlook (see Figure 1-8). Notes exist as individual message files, so you can copy or move them to other folders, including your desktop, or easily share them with others through network sharing or e-mail. You can also incorporate the contents of notes into other applications or other Outlook folders by using the clipboard. For example, you might copy a note regarding a contact to that person's contact entry. As you can with other Outlook items, you can assign categories to notes to help you organize and view them.

Figure 1-8. Use notes to keep track of miscellaneous information.

How Outlook Stores Data

If you work with Outlook primarily as a user, understanding how the program stores data will help you use it effectively to organize and manage your data on a daily basis, including storing and archiving Outlook items as needed. If you're charged with supporting other Outlook users, understanding how Outlook stores data will allow you to help others create and manage their folders and ensure the security and integrity of their data. And finally, because data storage is the foundation of all Outlook's features, understanding where and how the program stores data is critical if you're creating Outlook-based applications—for example, a data entry form that uses Outlook as the mechanism for posting the data to a public folder.

For information on building Outlook-based applications, see Chapters 40 through 43, which cover programming Outlook using Visual Basic and VBScript to create custom forms and applications.

You're probably familiar with folders (directories) in the file system. You use these folders to organize applications and documents. For example, the Program Files folder in the Microsoft Windows operating system is the default location for most applications that you install on the system, and the My Documents folder serves as the default location for document files. You create these types of folders in Windows Explorer.

Outlook also uses folders to organize data, but these folders are different from your file system folders. Rather than existing individually on your system's hard disk, these folders exist within Outlook's file structure. You view and manage these folders within Outlook's interface, not in Windows Explorer. Think of Outlook's folders as windows into your Outlook data rather than as individual elements that exist on disk. By default, Outlook includes several folders, as shown in Figure 1-9.

Figure 1-9. Folders organize your data in Outlook.

Personal Folders—PST Files

If your Outlook folders aren't stored as individual folders on your system's hard disk, where are they? The answer to that question depends on how you configure Outlook. As in earlier versions of Outlook, you can use a personal folders file to store your Outlook data. Outlook uses the PST file extension for a personal folders file, but you specify the file's name when you configure Outlook. For example, you might use your name as the file name to help you easily identify the file. The default PST file contains your Contacts, Calendar, Tasks, and other folders. You can use multiple PST files, adding additional personal folders to your Outlook configuration (see Figure 1-10 on the next page).

For example, you might want to create another set of folders to separate your personal information from work-related data. As you'll learn in Chapter 2, you can add personal folders to your Outlook configuration simply by adding another PST file to your profile.

Figure 1-10. You can add multiple sets of folders to your Outlook configuration.

NOTE:

If you use Outlook as an Exchange Server client, you probably store your data in the Exchange Server mailbox rather than in a local PST file. If that's the case, you need to use an offline folder (OST) file in order to work offline. OST files are covered in the following section.

OST Files

If you use Outlook as an Exchange Server client and do not use PST files to store your data (instead storing your data on the Exchange Server), OST files will allow you to work offline. The OST file acts essentially as an offline copy of your data store on the Exchange Server. When you're working offline, changes you make to contacts, messages, and other Outlook items and folders occur in the offline store. When you go online again, Outlook synchronizes the changes between the offline store and your Exchange Server store. For example, if you've deleted messages from your offline store, Outlook deletes those same messages from your online store when you synchronize the folders. Any new messages in your Inbox on the server are added to your offline store. Synchronization is a two-way process, providing the most up-to-date copy of your data in both locations, ensuring that changes made in each are reflected in the other.

For detailed information on important offline and remote access topics, see Chapter 35, "Working Offline and Remotely." For a discussion of the differences between remote mail and offline use, see Chapter 13, "Processing Messages Selectively."

Where Storage Files Are Located

When you create an Outlook storage file, Outlook defaults to a specific location for the file that varies according to your operating system:...

TIP: Find your data store If you're having trouble locating your existing storage files, choose File, Data File Management. In the Outlook Data Files dialog box (see Figure 1-11 on the next page), select the file you want to locate and then determine the file location from the Filename column. If you can't see the entire path, drag the column border to expand the column. Alternatively, to go straight to the folder containing the file, select the file and click Open Folder. In the folder window, choose Tools, Folder Options. From the View tab of the Folder Options dialog box, select Display The Full Path In The Title Bar to view the absolute, full path to the file. You can also use your operating system's Find/Search command to search for all files with a PST or OST file extension....

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
We'd Like to Hear From You
Introduction
Conventions and Features Used in This Book
Pt. 1 Working with Outlook 1
Ch. 1 Outlook Architecture, Setup, and Startup 3
Ch. 2 Advanced Setup Tasks 39
Ch. 3 Working in and Configuring Outlook 57
Ch. 4 Using Categories and Types 105
Pt. 2 Messaging 119
Ch. 5 Managing Address Books and Distribution Lists 121
Ch. 6 Using Internet Mail 145
Ch. 7 Sending and Receiving Messages 173
Ch. 8 Filtering, Organizing, and Using Automatic Responses 225
Ch. 9 Sending and Receiving Faxes 261
Ch. 10 Integrating Outlook Express and Outlook 281
Ch. 11 Using Outlook Express for Public and Private Newsgroups 297
Ch. 12 Securing Your System, Messages, and Identity 329
Ch. 13 Processing Messages Selectively 365
Pt. 3 Contact Management 379
Ch. 14 Managing Your Contacts 381
Ch. 15 Using LDAP Directory Services 421
Ch. 16 Making Notes 439
Ch. 17 Keeping a Journal 449
Pt. 4 Scheduling 477
Ch. 18 Scheduling Appointments 479
Ch. 19 Scheduling Meetings and Resources 521
Ch. 20 Managing Your Tasks 547
Ch. 21 Integrating Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Project 573
Pt. 5 Customizing Outlook 595
Ch. 22 Using Templates 597
Ch. 23 Customizing the Outlook Interface 605
Ch. 24 Creating Custom Views and Print Styles 631
Ch. 25 Automating Common Tasks 653
Pt. 6 Managing Outlook 663
Ch. 26 Integrating Outlook with Other Office Applications 665
Ch. 27 Delegating Responsibilities to an Assistant 679
Ch. 28 Managing Folders, Data, and Archiving 691
Ch. 29 Finding and Organizing Data 721
Ch. 30 Backing Up, Exporting, and Importing Information 733
Pt. 7 Using and Administering Outlook with Exchange Server 755
Ch. 31 Exchange Server Overview and Setup 757
Ch. 32 Configuring the Exchange Server Client 777
Ch. 33 Messaging with Exchange Server 789
Ch. 34 Sharing Information with Others 809
Ch. 35 Working Offline and Remotely 849
Ch. 36 Accessing Messages Through a Web Browser 871
Ch. 37 Network, Platform, and Deployment Considerations 901
Ch. 38 Supporting Outlook Under Exchange Server 917
Ch. 39 Backup Strategies and Virus Protection 949
Pt. 8 Developing Custom Forms and Applications 983
Ch. 40 Designing and Using Forms 985
Ch. 41 Programming Forms with VBScript 1013
Ch. 42 Using VBA in Outlook 1031
Ch. 43 Integrating Outlook and Other Applications with VBA 1063
App. A: Installing and Updating Outlook 1091
App. B: Office XP Resource Kit 1099
App. C: Update and Troubleshooting Resources 1103
App. D: Outlook Files and Registry Keys 1107
App. E: Outlook Add-Ins 1113
App. F: Outlook Symbols 1121
App. G: Outlook Shortcuts 1127
App. H: Outlook Fields and Properties 1141
Index of Troubleshooting Topics 1149
Index 1153
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First Chapter

Chapter 1.|Outlook Architecture, Setup, and Startup
  • Overview of Outlook
    • Messaging
    • Scheduling
    • Contact Management
    • Task Management
    • Tracking with Outlook’s Journal
    • Organizing Your Thoughts with Notes
  • How Outlook Stores Data
    • Personal Folders—PST Files
    • OST Files
    • Where Storage Files Are Located
    • Sharing Storage Files
  • Understanding Messaging Protocols
    • SMTP/POP3
    • IMAP
    • MAPI
    • LDAP
    • NNTP
    • HTML
    • MIME
    • S/MIME
    • MHTML
    • iCalendar, vCalendar, and vCard
  • Security Provisions in Outlook
    • Support for Security Zones
    • Attachment and Virus Security
    • Macro Viruses
    • Digital Signatures
    • Message Encryption
    • Security Labels
  • Understanding Outlook Service Options
  • Options for Starting Outlook
    • Normal Startup
    • Safe Mode Startup
    • Starting Outlook Automatically
    • Adding Outlook to the Quick Launch Bar
    • Changing the Outlook Shortcut
    • Use RUNAS to Change User Context
    • Startup Switches
    • Choosing a Startup View

Chapter 1   Outlook Architecture, Setup, and Startup

This chapter provides an overview of Microsoft Outlook’s architecture to help you learn not only how Outlook works but also how it stores data. Having that knowledge, particularly if you’re charged with administering or supporting Outlook for other users, will help you use the application more effectively and address issues related to data storage and security, archiving, working offline, and moving data between installations.

This chapter also explains the different options you have for connecting to e-mail servers through Outlook and the protocols (POP3 and IMAP, for example) that support those connections. In addition to learning about client support and the various platforms on which you can use Outlook, you’ll also learn about the options that are available for starting and using the program.

If you’re anxious to get started using Outlook, you could skip this chapter and move straight to Chapter 2, "Advanced Setup Tasks," to learn how to configure your e-mail accounts and begin working with Outlook. However, this chapter provides the foundation on which many subsequent chapters are based, and reading it will help you gain a deeper understanding of what Outlook can do so that you can use it effectively and efficiently.

Overview of Outlook

In many respects, Outlook is a personal information manager (PIM). A traditional PIM lets you maintain information about your contacts, such as your customers, coworkers, and clients. Traditional PIMs also let you keep track of your daily schedule, tasks to complete, and other personal or work-related information. Outlook does all that, but it goes well beyond the features of most PIMs to provide e-mail and fax support, group scheduling capability, and task management.

Outlook provides a broad range of capabilities to help you manage your entire work day. In fact, a growing number of Microsoft Office users work in Outlook more than 60 percent of the time. An understanding of Outlook’s capabilities and features is important not only to using Office effectively but also to managing your time and projects. The following sections will help you learn to use the features in Outlook to simplify your work day and enhance your productivity.

Messaging

One of the key features Outlook offers is messaging. You can use Outlook as a client to send and receive e-mail through a variety of services. Outlook offers integrated support for the following e-mail services:


NOTE:
A client application is one that uses a service provided by another computer, typically a server.

Exchange Server  Outlook provides full support for Microsoft Exchange Server, which means you can take advantage of workgroup scheduling, collaboration, instant messaging, and other features offered through Exchange Server that aren’t available with other clients. For example, you can use any POP3 e-mail client, such as Outlook Express, to connect to an Exchange Server (assuming the Exchange Server is running an Internet Mail Connector), but you’re limited to e-mail only. Advanced workgroup and other special features—being able to recall a message before it is read, use public folders, and vote, for example—require Outlook.

Internet e-mail  Outlook provides full support for Internet e-mail servers, which means you can use Outlook to send and receive e-mail through mail servers that support Internet-based standards, such as POP3 and IMAP. What’s more, you can integrate Internet mail accounts with other accounts, such as an Exchange Server account, to send and receive messages through multiple servers. For example, you might maintain an account on your Exchange Server for interoffice correspondence and use a local Internet service provider (ISP), CompuServe, Bigfoot, or other Internet-based e–mail service for messages outside your network. Or perhaps you want to monitor your personal e-mail along with your work-related e-mail. In that situation, you would simply add your personal e-mail account to your Outlook profile and work with both simultaneously. You can use rules and custom folders to help separate your messages.

For more information about messaging protocols such as POP3 and IMAP, see "Understanding Messaging Protocols," page 18.

newfeature! HTTP-based e-mail  Outlook 2002 supports HTTP-based e–mail services, such as Microsoft Hotmail. HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the protocol used to request and transmit Web pages. This means you can use Outlook to send and receive e-mail through Hotmail and other HTTP-based mail servers that would otherwise require you to use a Web browser to access your e-mail (see Figure 1-1). In addition, you can download your messages to your local inbox and process them offline, rather than remaining connected to your ISP while you process messages. Another advantage is that you can keep your messages as long as you want—most HTTP-based messaging services, including Hotmail, purge read messages after a given period of time. Plus, HTTP support in Outlook lets you keep all your e-mail in a single application. Currently, Outlook 2002 directly supports Hotmail. Check with your e-mail service to determine whether your mail server is Outlook-compatible.

Figure 1-1.  HTTP-based mail servers such as Hotmail have traditionally required access through a Web browser. (Image unavailable)

Fax send and receive  Outlook 2002 includes a Fax Mail Transport provider, which allows you to send and receive faxes using a fax modem. The Fax Mail Transport included with Outlook provides Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) support so that incoming fax messages can be routed through your Outlook Inbox, with the MAPI-aware fax application handling the actual fax processing (send, receive, view, and so on). Most Microsoft platforms provide built-in fax capability, but actual support varies from one platform to another. In addition, third-party developers can provide MAPI integration with their fax applications, allowing you to use Outlook as the front end for those applications to send and receive faxes. Symantec’s WinFax is a good example of such an application. The fax service in Microsoft Windows 2000 also supports MAPI and Inbox integration with Outlook and is the only Microsoft-supplied fax service supported by Microsoft for Outlook.


InsideOut:
Windows 2000 fax service is now the only fax support offered for Windows. Windows 9x users will need to purchase a third-party fax application such as WinFax.

For a detailed explanation of how to use Outlook to send and receive faxes (complete with cover pages and other details), see Chapter 9, "Sending and Receiving Faxes."

Extensible e-mail support  Outlook’s design allows developers to support third-party e-mail services in Outlook, such as cc:Mail and Lotus Notes. This support doesn’t guarantee the availability of these third-party tools, however. For example, although earlier versions of Outlook included support for cc:Mail, Microsoft no longer offers its own service provider for support of cc:Mail.


InsideOut:
Outlook 2002 does not include the Microsoft Mail service provider. Microsoft no longer supports this product and customers who used this service will need to find another service provider.

Whatever your e-mail server type, Outlook provides a comprehensive set of tools for composing, receiving, and replying to messages. Outlook provides support for rich-text and HTML formatting, which allows you to create and receive messages that contain much more than just text (see Figure 1-2). For example, you can send a Web page as a mail message or integrate sound, video, and graphics in mail messages. Outlook’s support for multiple address books, multiple e-mail accounts, and even multiple e-mail services makes it an excellent messaging client, even if you forgo the application’s many other features and capabilities.

Scheduling

Scheduling is another important feature in Outlook. You can use Outlook to track both personal and work-related meetings and appointments (see Figure 1-3), whether at home or in the office, a useful feature even on a stand-alone computer.

Figure 1-2.  Use Outlook to create rich-text and multimedia messages. (Image unavailable)

Figure 1-3.  Track your personal and work schedules with Outlook. (Image unavailable)

newfeature!   Where Outlook’s scheduling capabilities really shine, however, is in group scheduling. When you use Outlook to set up meetings and appointments with others, you can view the schedules of your invitees, which makes it easy to find a time when everyone can attend. You can schedule both one-time and recurring appointments. All appointments and meetings can include a reminder with a lead time that you specify, and Outlook will notify you of the event at the specified time. A new feature in Outlook 2002 lets you process multiple reminders at one time, a useful feature if you’ve been out of the office for a while.

newfeature!   Organizing your schedule is also one of Outlook’s strong suits. You can use categories and types to categorize appointments, events, and meetings; to control the way they appear in Outlook; and to perform automatic processing. Color labels allow you to identify quickly and visually different types of events on your calendar.

In addition to managing your own schedule, you can delegate control of the schedule to someone else, such as your assistant. The assistant can modify your schedule, request meetings, respond to meeting invitations, and otherwise act on your behalf regarding your calendar. Not only can others view your schedule to plan meetings and appointments (with the exception of items marked personal), but you can also publish your schedule to the Web to allow others to view it over an intranet or the Internet (see Figure 1-4).

Figure 1-4.  You can easily publish your schedule to the Web. (Image unavailable)

Contact Management

Being able to manage contact information—names, addresses, and phone numbers—is critical to other aspects of Outlook, such as scheduling and messaging. Outlook makes it easy to manage contacts and offers flexibility in the type of information you maintain. In addition to basic information, you can also store a contact’s fax number, cell phone number, pager number, Web page URL, and more (see Figure 1-5).

Figure 1-5.  You can manage a wealth of information about each contact. (Image unavailable)

Besides using contact information to address e-mail messages, you can initiate phone calls using the contacts list, track calls to contacts in the journal, add notes for each contact, use the contacts list to create mail merge documents, and perform other tasks. The Contacts folder also provides a means for storing a contact’s digital certificate, which you can use to exchange encrypted messages for security. Adding a contact’s certificate is easy—just receive a digitally signed message from the contact and Outlook will add the certificate to the contact’s entry. You can also import a certificate from a file provided by the contact.

For details about digital signatures and encryption, see "Encrypting Messages," page 354. For additional information on the journal, see "Tracking with Outlook’s Journal," page 10. For complete details on how to use the journal, see Chapter 17, "Keeping a Journal."

Task Management

Managing your work day usually includes keeping track of the tasks you need to perform and assigning tasks to others. Outlook makes it easy to manage your task list. You assign a due date, start date, priority, category, and other properties to each task, which makes it easier for you to manage those tasks (see Figure 1-6). As with meetings and appointments, Outlook keeps you informed and on track by issuing reminders for each task. You control whether the reminder is used and the time and date it’s generated, along with an optional, audible notification. You can designate a task as personal, preventing others from viewing the task in your schedule—just as you can with meetings and appointments. Tasks can be one-time or recurring.

Figure 1-6.  Use Outlook to manage tasks. (Image unavailable)

If you manage others, Outlook makes it easy to assign tasks to other Outlook users. When you create a task, you simply click Assign Task, and Outlook prompts you for the assignee’s e-mail address. You can choose to keep a copy of the updated task in your own task list and receive a status report when the task is complete.

Tracking with Outlook’s Journal

Keeping track of events is an important part of managing your work day, and Outlook’s journal makes it simple. The Journal folder allows you to keep track of the contacts you make (phone calls, e-mails, and so on), meeting actions, task requests and responses, and other actions for selected contacts (see Figure 1-7). You can also use the journal to track your work in other Microsoft Office applications, giving you a way to track the time you spend on various documents and their associated projects. You can have Outlook journal items automatically based on settings that you specify, and you can also add items manually to your journal.

Figure 1-7.  Configure your journal using Outlook’s options. (Image unavailable)

When you view the journal, you can double-click a journal entry to either open the entry or open the items referred to by the entry, depending on how you have configured the journal. You can also configure the journal to automatically archive items to the default archive folder or a folder you choose, or you can have Outlook regularly delete items from the journal, cleaning out items that are older than a specified length of time. Outlook can use group policies to control the retention of journal entries, allowing a system administrator to manage journaling and data retention consistently throughout an organization.

Organizing Your Thoughts with Notes

With Outlook, you can keep track of your thoughts and tasks by using the Notes folder. Each note can function as a stand-alone window, allowing you to view notes on your desktop outside Outlook (see Figure 1-8). Notes exist as individual message files, so you can copy or move them to other folders, including your desktop, or easily share them with others through network sharing or e-mail. You can also incorporate the contents of notes into other applications or other Outlook folders by using the clipboard. For example, you might copy a note regarding a contact to that person’s contact entry. As you can with other Outlook items, you can assign categories to notes to help you organize and view them.

Figure 1-8.  Use notes to keep track of miscellaneous information. (Image unavailable)

How Outlook Stores Data

If you work with Outlook primarily as a user, understanding how the program stores data will help you use it effectively to organize and manage your data on a daily basis, including storing and archiving Outlook items as needed. If you’re charged with supporting other Outlook users, understanding how Outlook stores data will allow you to help others create and manage their folders and ensure the security and integrity of their data. And finally, because data storage is the foundation of all Outlook’s features, understanding where and how the program stores data is critical if you’re creating Outlook-based applications—for example, a data entry form that uses Outlook as the mechanism for posting the data to a public folder.

For information on building Outlook-based applications, see Chapters 40 through 43, which cover programming Outlook using Visual Basic and VBScript to create custom forms and applications.

You’re probably familiar with folders (directories) in the file system. You use these folders to organize applications and documents. For example, the Program Files folder in the Microsoft Windows operating system is the default location for most applications that you install on the system, and the My Documents folder serves as the default location for document files. You create these types of folders in Windows Explorer.

Outlook also uses folders to organize data, but these folders are different from your file system folders. Rather than existing individually on your system’s hard disk, these folders exist within Outlook’s file structure. You view and manage these folders within Outlook’s interface, not in Windows Explorer. Think of Outlook’s folders as windows into your Outlook data rather than as individual elements that exist on disk. By default, Outlook includes several folders, as shown in Figure 1-9.

Figure 1-9.  Folders organize your data in Outlook. (Image unavailable)

Personal Folders—PST Files

If your Outlook folders aren’t stored as individual folders on your system’s hard disk, where are they? The answer to that question depends on how you configure Outlook. As in earlier versions of Outlook, you can use a personal folders file to store your Outlook data. Outlook uses the PST file extension for a personal folders file, but you specify the file’s name when you configure Outlook. For example, you might use your name as the file name to help you easily identify the file. The default PST file contains your Contacts, Calendar, Tasks, and other folders.

You can use multiple PST files, adding additional personal folders to your Outlook configuration (see Figure 1-10 on the next page). For example, you might want to create another set of folders to separate your personal information from work-related data. As you’ll learn in Chapter 2, you can add personal folders to your Outlook configuration simply by adding another PST file to your profile.

Figure 1-10.  You can add multiple sets of folders to your Outlook configuration. (Image unavailable)


NOTE:
If you use Outlook as an Exchange Server client, you probably store your data in the Exchange Server mailbox rather than in a local PST file. If that’s the case, you need to use an offline folder (OST) file in order to work offline. OST files are covered in the following section.

OST Files

If you use Outlook as an Exchange Server client and do not use PST files to store your data (instead storing your data on the Exchange Server), OST files will allow you to work offline. The OST file acts essentially as an offline copy of your data store on the Exchange Server. When you’re working offline, changes you make to contacts, messages, and other Outlook items and folders occur in the offline store. When you go online again, Outlook synchronizes the changes between the offline store and your Exchange Server store. For example, if you’ve deleted messages from your offline store, Outlook deletes those same messages from your online store when you synchronize the folders. Any new messages in your Inbox on the server are added to your offline store. Synchronization is a two-way process, providing the most up-to-date copy of your data in both locations, ensuring that changes made in each are reflected in the other.

For detailed information on important offline and remote access topics, see Chapter 35, "Working Offline and Remotely." For a discussion of the differences between remote mail and offline use, see Chapter 13, "Processing Messages Selectively."

Where Storage Files Are Located

When you create an Outlook storage file, Outlook defaults to a specific location for the file that varies according to your operating system:

  • Windows 9x. The default location is \Windows\Local Settings
    \Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook. On systems running Windows 9x that are configured to maintain unique user profiles (useful where multiple users share a single Windows 9x computer), the user profiles are stored in the \Profiles folder. On these systems, Outlook places the storage files by default in \Profiles\<user>\Local Settings\Application Data\ Microsoft\Outlook.

  • TIP:
    To maintain unique user profiles in Windows 98, configure Windows through the Users icon in Control Panel.
  • Windows NT. The default location for systems running Windows NT is \%systemroot%\Profiles\<user>\Local Settings\Application Data\
    Microsoft\Outlook, where %systemroot% by default is \Winnt.
  • Windows 2000. The default location is \Documents And Settings\<user> \Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook. On systems running Windows 2000 that were upgraded from Windows NT, the user profiles still reside in the \Winnt\Profiles folder. On these systems, therefore, Outlook places the storage files by default in \%systemroot%\Profiles\
    <user>\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook. As with Windows NT, %systemroot% defaults to \Winnt.

TIP:   Find your data store
If you’re having trouble locating your existing storage files, choose File, Data File Management. In the Outlook Data Files dialog box (see Figure 1-11 on the next page), select the file you want to locate and then determine the file location from the Filename column. If you can’t see the entire path, drag the column border to expand the column. Alternatively, to go straight to the folder containing the file, select the file and click Open Folder. In the folder window, choose Tools, Folder Options. From the View tab of the Folder Options dialog box, select Display The Full Path In The Title Bar to view the absolute, full path to the file. You can also use your operating system’s Find/Search command to search for all files with a PST or OST file extension.

Figure 1-11.  Locate your data files by using the Outlook Data Files dialog box.  (Image unavailable)

If you use the same computer all the time, it’s generally best to store your Outlook files on your system’s local hard disk. In some situations, however, you will probably want to store them on a network share. For example, you might connect from different computers on the network and use a roaming profile to provide a consistent desktop and user interface regardless of your logon location. (A roaming profile allows your desktop configuration, documents, and other elements of your desktop environment to be duplicated wherever you log on.) In this situation, you (or the network administrator) would configure your profile to place your home folder on a network server that is available to you from all logon locations. Your Outlook files would then be stored on that network share, making them available to you on whichever computer you use to log on to the network. Placing your Outlook files on a server gives you the added potential benefit of incorporating your Outlook data files in the server’s backup strategy.

For a detailed discussion of using roaming profiles to provide seamless access to Outlook, see Chapter 37, "Network, Platform, and Deployment Considerations." To learn how to move your Outlook files from one location to another (such as from a local drive to a network share), see "Changing Your Data Storage Location," page 54.


Troubleshooting

You use a roaming profile and logon time is increasing.

If you use Outlook as a client for Exchange Server, your best option is to use your Exchange Server mailbox as the store location for your data rather than using a PST file. However, if you use a roaming profile for consistent logon from multiple locations on the local area network (LAN), consider including the OST file in the roaming profile so that you’ll always have access to it. If the Exchange Server is unavailable, you’ll still be able to work with your Outlook data through the OST file; and placing the OST file in your roaming profile allows you to use it regardless of your logon location.

Keep in mind, however, that the OST file can become quite large if you have a lot of data in your Exchange Server mailbox. The size of the profile affects logon time, and a large profile can cause an excessive amount of network traffic as the files are copied from the server to your workstation. Use aggressive archiving and other housecleaning methods to keep your Outlook data to a minimum, and monitor your roaming profile size as often as possible.


Sharing Storage Files

Outlook provides excellent functionality for sharing information with others. Toward that end, you can share your data using a couple of different methods. You can configure permissions for individual folders to allow specific users to connect to those folders and view the data contained in them. You can also configure delegate access to your folders to allow an assistant to manage items for you in the folders. For example, you might have your assistant manage your schedule but not your tasks. In that case, you would configure delegate access for the Calendar folder but not for the Tasks folder.

For a detailed discussion of delegation, see Chapter 27, "Delegating Responsibilities to an Assistant." To learn how to configure sharing permissions for individual folders and additional methods for sharing data, see Chapter 34, "Sharing Information with Others."

Understanding Messaging Protocols

A messaging protocol is a mechanism that messaging servers and applications use to transfer messages. Being able to use a specific e-mail service requires that your application support the same protocols the server uses. In order to configure Outlook as a messaging client, you need to understand the various protocols supported by Outlook and the types of servers that employ each type. The following sections provide an overview of these protocols.

SMTP/POP3

Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) is a standards-based protocol used for transferring messages and is the primary mechanism that Internet-based and intranet-based e–mail servers use to transfer messages. It’s also the mechanism that Outlook uses to connect to a mail server to send messages for an Internet account. Therefore, SMTP is the protocol used by an Internet mail account for outgoing messages.

SMTP operates by default on TCP port 25. When you configure an Internet-based e–mail account, the outgoing mail server setting is determined by the port on which the server is listening for SMTP. Unless your e-mail server uses a different port (unlikely), you can use the default port value of 25.

Post Office Protocol 3 (POP3) is a standards-based protocol that clients can use to access messages from any mail server that supports POP3. This is the protocol that Outlook uses when retrieving messages from an Internet-based or intranet-based mail server that supports POP3 mailboxes. ISP-based mail servers invariably use POP3, as do other mail servers. For example, CompuServe Classic provides POP3 support, allowing you to retrieve your CompuServe mail through Outlook. Exchange Server also supports the use of POP3 for retrieving mail.

POP3 operates on TCP port 110 by default. Unless your server uses a nonstandard port configuration, you can leave the port setting as is when defining a POP3 mail account. Figure 1-12 shows the Internet E-Mail Settings dialog box, which you use to configure the incoming and outgoing mail server settings for an Internet mail account. Click the More Settings button if you need to change port settings for the account.

To learn how to set up an Internet e-mail account for an SMTP/POP3 server, see "Using Internet POP3 E-Mail Accounts," page 154. To learn how to add the account and configure advanced properties, such as SMTP or POP3 port assignments, see "Configuring Advanced Settings for Internet Accounts," page 159.

Figure 1-12.  Use the E-Mail Accounts Wizard’s Internet E-Mail Settings page to configure the incoming and outgoing mail server settings. (Image unavailable)

IMAP

Like POP3, Internet Mail Access Protocol (IMAP) is a standards-based protocol that enables message transfer. However, IMAP offers some significant differences from POP3. For example, POP3 is primarily designed as an offline protocol, which means you retrieve your messages from a server and download them to your local message store (such as your local Outlook folders). IMAP is designed primarily as an online protocol, which allows a remote user to manipulate messages and message folders on the server without having to download them. This is particularly helpful for users who need to access the same remote mailbox from multiple locations, such as from home and work, using different computers. Because the messages remain on the server, IMAP eliminates the need for message synchronization.


TIP:   Keep messages on the server
You can configure a POP3 account in Outlook to leave a copy of messages on the server, allowing you to retrieve those messages later from another computer. To learn how to configure a POP3 account, see "Using Internet POP3 E-Mail Accounts," page 154.

IMAP offers other advantages over POP3. For example, with IMAP, you can search for messages on the server using a variety of message attributes, such as sender, message size, or message header. IMAP also offers better support for attachments, because it can separate attachments from the header and text portion of a message. This is particularly useful with multipart MIME messages, allowing you to read a message without downloading the attachments so that you can decide which attachments you want to retrieve. With POP3, the entire message must be downloaded.

Security is another advantage of IMAP, because IMAP uses a challenge-response mechanism to authenticate the user for mailbox access. This prevents the user’s password from being transmitted as clear text across the network, as it is with POP3.

IMAP support in Outlook allows you to use Outlook as a client to an IMAP-compliant e-mail server. Although IMAP provides for server-side storage and the ability to create additional mail folders on the server, it does not offer some of the same features as Exchange Server or even POP3. For example, you can’t store nonmail folders on the server. Also, special folders such as Sent Items, Drafts, and Deleted Items can’t be stored on the IMAP server. Even with these limitations, however, IMAP serves as a flexible protocol and surpasses POP3 in capability. Unless a competing standard appears in the future, it is likely that IMAP will replace POP3.

For information about other advantages and disadvantages of IMAP and how they affect Outlook, see "Using IMAP Accounts," page 161.


NOTE:
For additional technical information on IMAP, point your browser to http://www.ima.com/whitepaper/index.html or http://www.cyrusoft.com/imap/imapInfo.html, or refer to RFC 2060, which you can find at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2060.txt.

MAPI

Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) is a Microsoft-developed application programming interface (API) that facilitates communication between mail-enabled applications. MAPI support makes it possible for other applications to send and receive messages using Outlook. For example, third-party fax applications, such as Symantec’s WinFax, can place incoming faxes in your Inbox through MAPI. As another example, a third-party MAPI-aware application could read and write to your Outlook Address Book through MAPI calls. MAPI is not a message protocol, but understanding its function in Outlook will help you install, configure, and use MAPI-aware applications to integrate Outlook.

LDAP

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) was designed to serve with less overhead and fewer resource requirements than its precursor, the Directory Access Protocol, which was developed for X.500. LDAP is a standards-based protocol that allows clients to query data in a directory service over a TCP connection. For example, Windows 2000 uses LDAP as the primary means for querying the Active Directory (AD). Exchange Server supports LDAP queries, allowing clients to look up address information for subscribers on the server. Other directory services on the Internet, such as Bigfoot, InfoSpace, Yahoo!, and others, employ LDAP to implement searches of their databases.

Like Outlook Express, Outlook 2002 allows you to add directory service accounts that use LDAP as their protocol to query directory services for e-mail addresses, phone numbers, and other information regarding subscribers.

To learn how to add and configure an LDAP directory service in Outlook, see "Configuring a Directory Service Account in Outlook," page 425.


NOTE:
For additional information regarding LDAP, refer to "MS Strategy for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)," available in the NT Server Technical Notes section of Microsoft TechNet or on the Web at http://www.microsoft.com/TechNet/winnt/Winntas/technote/ldapcmr.asp.

NNTP

Network News Transport Protocol (NNTP) is the standards-based protocol for server-to-server and client-to-server transfer of news messages, or the underlying protocol that makes possible public and private newsgroups. Outlook does not directly support the creation of accounts to access newsgroup servers, but instead relies on Outlook Express as its default newsreader (see Figure 1-13).

Figure 1-13.  Outlook relies on Outlook Express for reading and posting to public and private newsgroups. (Image unavailable)


NOTE:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server includes an NNTP service that lets a network administrator set up a news server to host newsgroups that can be accessed by local intranet or remote Internet users. Exchange Server allows the NNTP service to interface with other public or private news servers to pull newsgroups and messages via news feeds. Therefore, Windows 2000 Server by itself lets you set up your own newsgroup server to host your own newsgroups, and Exchange Server lets you host public Internet newsgroups.

Using Outlook Express, you can download newsgroups, read messages, post messages, and perform other news-related tasks. Other third-party news applications, such as Forte’s Agent, offer extended capabilities. Forte’s Web site is located at http://www.forteinc.com.

For a detailed explanation of setting up Outlook Express as a news reader, see Chapter 11, "Using Outlook Express for Public and Private Newsgroups."

HTML

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is the protocol used most commonly to define and transmit Web pages. Several e-mail services, including Hotmail and Yahoo!, provide access to client mailboxes via Web pages and therefore make use of HTML as their message transfer protocol. You connect to the Web site and use the features and commands found there to view messages, send messages, and download attachments.

Outlook provides enhanced HTML support, which means you can configure Outlook as a client for HTML-based mail services. As mentioned earlier in the chapter, Outlook includes built-in support for Hotmail. HTML support is purely a server-side issue, so HTML-based mail services other than Hotmail will have to provide Outlook support on their own sites. Hotmail accomplishes this support programmatically by means of Active Server Pages (ASP).


TIP:   Find Hotmail’s Outlook-based access
The URL for Hotmail’s Outlook-based access is http://services.msn.com/svcs/hotmail/httpmail.asp. Outlook configures the URL automatically when you set up a Hotmail account in Outlook (see Figure 1-14). You can’t browse to this URL through your Web browser to retrieve your e-mail, however.

Figure 1-14.  Outlook configures the URL automatically for Hotmail, but you must enter the URL manually for other HTTP-based e-mail services. (Image unavailable)

MIME

Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) is a standard specification for defining file formats used to exchange e-mail, files, and other documents across the Internet or an intranet. Each of the many MIME types defines the content type of the data contained in the attachment. MIME maps the content to a specific file type and extension, allowing the e-mail client to pass the MIME attachment to an external application for processing. For example, if you receive a message containing a WAV file attachment, Outlook passes the file to the default WAV file player on your system.

S/MIME

Secure Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME ) is a standard that allows e–mail applications to send digitally signed and encrypted messages. S/MIME is therefore a mechanism through which Outlook permits you to include digital signatures with messages to ensure their authenticity and to encrypt messages to prevent unauthorized access to them.

For a detailed discussion of using Outlook to send digitally signed and encrypted messages, as well as other security-related issues such as virus protection and security zones, see Chapter 12, "Securing Your System, Messages, and Identity."

MHTML

MIME HTML (MHTML) represents MIME encapsulation of HTML documents. MHTML allows you to send and receive Web pages and other HTML-based documents and to embed images directly in the body of a message rather than attaching them to the message. See the preceding sections for an explanation of MIME.

iCalendar, vCalendar, and vCard

iCalendar, vCalendar, and vCard are Internet-based standards that provide a means for people to share calendar free/busy information and contact information across the Internet. The iCalendar standard allows calendar/scheduling applications to share free/busy information with other applications that support iCalendar. The vCalendar standard provides a mechanism for vCalendar-compliant applications to exchange meeting requests across the Internet. The vCard standard allows applications to share contact information as Internet vCards (electronic business cards). Outlook supports these standards in order to share information and interact with other messaging and scheduling applications across the Internet.

Security Provisions in Outlook

Outlook 2002 provides several features for ensuring the security of your data, messages, and identity. This section of the chapter presents a brief overview of security features in Outlook to give you a basic understanding of the issues involved, with references to other locations in the book that offer more detailed information on these topics.

Support for Security Zones

Like Microsoft Internet Explorer, Outlook supports the use of security zones. In Internet Explorer, security zones allow you to specify the types of actions that scripts can take on your system, based on the zone from which they were accessed. This prevents a malicious script from surreptitiously gathering information from your system and sending it to a Web site or doing local damage such as deleting files. In Internet Explorer, you can configure four zones, each with different security settings that define the tasks scripts can perform. For example, you can disable download of signed and unsigned ActiveX controls, specify how cookies are stored on your system, or disable scripting of Java applets.

Because Outlook can receive HTML-based messages, your computer is exposed to the same security risks posed by Internet browsing with Internet Explorer. The risk is actually worse with e-mail, considering that you generally make a conscious effort to visit a Web page—e-mail messages, in contrast, come at you unbidden, therefore making your system subject to a more active form of attack. By supporting Internet Explorer’s security zones, Outlook allows you to specify the zone from which e-mail messages should be considered to have originated, letting you guard against HTML-based security risks.

To learn how to apply security zones to protect your system, see "Using Security Zones," page 330.

Attachment and Virus Security

You probably are aware that a virus is an application that infects your system and typically causes some type of damage. The action caused by a virus can be as innocuous as displaying a message or as damaging as deleting data from your hard disk. One especially insidious form of virus, called a worm, spreads itself automatically, usually by mailing itself to every contact in the infected system’s address book. Guarding against such viruses, then, is a critical issue.

Outlook offers two levels of attachment security to guard against virus and worm infections, Level 1 and Level 2. Outlook automatically blocks Level 1 attachments, a category that includes almost 40 file types with the potential to allow a virus to cause damage to your system—for example, EXE and VBS files. If you receive a Level 1 attachment, Outlook displays a paper clip icon beside the message but does not allow you to open or save the attachment. When you send a Level 1 attachment, Outlook displays a reminder that other Outlook users might not be able to receive the attachment, giving you the option of converting it to a different file type (such as a ZIP file) before sending it. If you receive a Level 2 attachment, Outlook allows you to save the attachment to disk but not open it directly. You can then process the file with your virus checker before opening it.


TIP:   Update your virus definitions often
Your virus scanner is only as good as its definition file. New viruses crop up every day, so it’s critical that you have an up-to-date virus definition file and put in place a strategy to ensure that your virus definitions are always current.

If you use Exchange Server to host your mailbox, the Exchange Server administrator can configure Level 1 and Level 2 attachments, adding or removing attachment types for each level. In addition, Outlook allows all users to control the security-level assignments for attachments.

For a detailed discussion of Outlook’s virus protection, see "Protecting Against Viruses in Attachments," page 360.

Macro Viruses

Although viruses were once found almost exclusively in executable files, viruses embedded in document macros have become very common, and Office documents are as subject to them as any. However, Outlook and other Office applications provide a means for you to guard against macro viruses. In Outlook, you can select one of three macro security levels, as shown in Figure 1-15 on the next page. These security levels let you configure Outlook to run only signed macros from trusted sources (High), prompt you to choose whether to let the macro execute (Medium), or allow all macros to execute (Low). You can also specify which sources are trusted.

Figure 1-15.  Use macro security to prevent macro-borne viruses from affecting your system. (Image unavailable)

To learn how to configure and use macro virus protection, see "Protecting Against Office Macro Viruses," page 364.

Digital Signatures

Outlook allows you to add a certificate-based digital signature to a message to validate your identity to the message recipient. Because the signature is derived from a certificate that is issued to you and that you share with the recipient, the recipient can be guaranteed that the message originated with you, rather than with someone trying to impersonate your identity.

For information about how to obtain a certificate and use it to digitally sign your outgoing messages, see "Protecting Messages with Digital Signatures," page 332.

In addition to signing your outgoing messages, you can also use secure message receipts that notify you that your message has been verified by the recipient’s system. The lack of a return receipt indicates that the recipient’s system did not validate your identity. In such a case, you can contact the recipient to make sure that he or she has a copy of your digital signature.


NOTE:
Although you can configure Outlook to send a digital signature to a recipient, there is no guarantee that the recipient will add the digital signature to his or her contacts list. Until the recipient adds the signature, digitally signed messages will not be validated, nor will the recipient be able to read encrypted messages from you.

Message Encryption

Where the possibility of interception exists (whether someone intercepts your message before it reaches the intended recipient or someone else at the recipient’s end tries to read the message), Outlook message encryption can help you keep prying eyes away from sensitive messages. This feature also relies on your digital signature to encrypt the message and to allow the recipient to decrypt and read the message. Someone who receives the message without first having the public key portion of your certificate installed on his or her system will see a garbled message.

To learn how to obtain a certificate and use it to encrypt your outgoing messages, as well as how to read encrypted messages you receive from others, see "Encrypting Messages," page 354.

Security Labels

The security labels feature in this version of Outlook relies on security policies in Windows 2000 (and is therefore supported only on clients running Windows 2000). Security labels let you add additional security information, such as message sensitivity, to a message header. You can also use security labels to restrict which recipients can open, forward, or send a specific message. Security labels therefore provide a quick indicator of a message’s sensitivity and control over the actions that others can take with a message.

Understanding Outlook Service Options

If you’ve been using an earlier version of Outlook, you’re probably familiar with Outlook’s service options. Earlier versions of Outlook supported three service options: No Mail, Internet Mail Only (IMO), and Corporate/Workgroup (C/W). Outlook 2002 changes that with a new unified mode. Outlook unified mode refers to the integration of mail services in Outlook, which allows you to configure and use multiple services in a single profile. This means that you can use Exchange Server, POP3, IMAP, and Hotmail accounts all in one profile and at the same time.

To learn how to work with profiles and add multiple accounts to a profile, see "Understanding User Profiles," page 44.

Although Outlook makes a great e-mail client for a wide range of mail services, you might prefer to use only its contact management, scheduling, and other nonmessaging features and to use a different application (such as Outlook Express) for your messaging needs. There is no downside to using Outlook in this configuration, although you should keep in mind that certain features, such as integrated scheduling, rely on Outlook’s messaging features. If you need to take advantage of these features, you should switch to using Outlook as your primary messaging application.

Options for Starting Outlook

Office offers several options to control startup, either through command-line switches or other methods. You can choose to have Outlook open forms, turn off the preview pane, select a profile, and perform other tasks automatically when the program starts. The following sections describe some of the options you can specify.

Normal Startup

When you install Outlook, Setup places a Microsoft Outlook icon on the desktop. You can start Outlook normally by double-clicking the icon. You also can start Outlook by using the Start menu (choose Start, Programs, Microsoft Outlook).

When Outlook starts normally and without command-line switches, it prompts you for the profile to use (see Figure 1-16) if more than one exists. The profile contains your account settings and configures Outlook for your e-mail servers, directory services, data files, and other Outlook settings.

Figure 1-16.  Outlook prompts you to choose a profile at startup. (Image unavailable)

You can use multiple profiles to maintain multiple identities in Outlook. For example, you might use one profile for your work-related items and a second one for your personal items. To use an existing profile, simply choose it from the drop-down list in the Choose Profile dialog box and click OK. Click New to create a new profile (covered in Chapter 2, "Advanced Setup Tasks"). Click Options to expand the Choose Profile dialog box to include the following options (as shown in Figure 1-16):

  • Set As Default Profile. Select this option to specify the selected profile as the default profile, which will appear in the drop-down list by default in subsequent Outlook sessions. For example, if you maintain separate personal and work profiles, and your personal profile always appears in the drop-down list, select your work profile and choose this option to make the work profile the default.
  • Show All Logon Screens. Select this option to have Outlook prompt you for all startup options, including which address book to use; how to display names in the address book; the display name, file name, and password for your local data store; options for individual services such as Exchange Server or the Fax Mail Provider; and personal folders options.

For an in-depth discussion of creating and configuring profiles, see "Understanding User Profiles," page 44. The details of configuring service providers (such as for Exchange Server) are covered in various chapters where appropriate—for example, Chapter 6, "Using Internet Mail," explains how to configure POP3 and IMAP accounts; and Chapter 32, "Configuring the Exchange Server Client," explains how to configure Exchange Server accounts.

Safe Mode Startup

Safe mode is a new startup mode available in Outlook 2002 and the other Microsoft Office XP applications. Safe mode makes it possible for Office applications to automatically recover from specific errors during startup, such as a problem with an add-in or a corrupt registry. Safe mode allows Outlook to detect the problem and either correct it or bypass it by isolating the source.

When Outlook starts automatically in safe mode, you see a dialog box that displays the source of the problem and asks whether you want to continue to open the program, bypassing the problem source, or try to restart the program again. If you direct Outlook to continue starting, the problem items are disabled, and you can view them in the Disabled Items dialog box (see Figure 1-17 on the next page). To open this dialog box, choose Help, About Microsoft Outlook, and click Disabled Items. To enable a disabled item, select the item and click Enable.

Figure 1-17.  Use the Disabled Items dialog box to review and enable items. (Image unavailable)

In certain situations, you might want to force Outlook into safe mode when it would otherwise start normally—for example, if you want to prevent add-ins from loading or prevent customized toolbars or command bars from loading. To start Outlook (or any other Office application) in safe mode, hold down the Ctrl key and start the program. Outlook detects the Ctrl key and asks whether you want to start Outlook in safe mode. Click Yes to start in safe mode or No to start normally.

If you start an application in safe mode, you will not be able to perform certain actions in the application. The following is a summary (not all of which apply to Outlook):

  • Templates can’t be saved.
  • The last used Web page is not loaded (FrontPage).
  • Customized toolbars and command bars are not opened. Customizations that you make in safe mode can’t be changed.
  • The AutoCorrect list isn’t loaded, nor can changes you make to AutoCorrect in safe mode be saved.
  • Recovered documents are not opened automatically.
  • No smart tags are loaded, and new smart tags can’t be saved.
  • Command-line options other than /a and /n are ignored.
  • You can’t save files to the Alternate Startup Directory.
  • You can’t save preferences.
  • Additional features and programs (such as add-ins) do not load automatically.

To start Outlook normally, simply shut down the program and start it again without pressing the Ctrl key.

Starting Outlook Automatically

If you’re like most Office users, you work in Outlook a majority of the time. Because Outlook is such an important aspect of your work day, you probably want it to start automatically when you log on to your computer, saving you the trouble of starting it later. Although you have a few options for starting Outlook automatically, the best solution is to place a shortcut to Outlook in your Startup folder.

Follow these steps to start Outlook automatically in Windows 98 and Windows 2000:

  1. Close or minimize all windows on the desktop.
  2. Locate the Microsoft Outlook icon on the desktop, and drag it to the Start button. Don’t release the mouse button.
  3. Hold the pointer over the Start menu until it opens; then, while continuing to hold down the mouse button, open the Programs menu and then the Startup menu.
  4. Place the cursor on the Startup menu and release the mouse button. Windows informs you that you can’t move the item and asks whether you want to create a shortcut. Click Yes.

TIP:   Create a new Outlook shortcut

If you don’t have a Microsoft Outlook icon on the desktop, you can use the Outlook executable to create a shortcut. Open Windows Explorer and browse to the folder \Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10. Create a shortcut to the executable Outlook.exe. Note that the default syntax for the standard Microsoft Outlook shortcut is "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10\Outlook.exe" /recycle. For an explanation of the /recycle switch and other Outlook startup options, see "Startup Switches," page 35.


You can use the following procedure to accomplish the same task in Windows 95 and Windows NT:

  1. Right-click an empty area of the taskbar, and choose Properties.
  2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Advanced.
  3. In the resulting Windows Explorer window, open the Startup folder.
  4. Using the right mouse button, drag the Microsoft Outlook icon from the desktop to the Startup folder, release it, and choose Create Shortcut(s) Here.
  5. Close the Windows Explorer window and the taskbar dialog box.

TIP:   Change Outlook’s shortcut properties
If you want to change the way Outlook starts from the shortcut in your Startup folder (for example, you might want to add command switches), you need only change the shortcut’s properties. For details, see "Changing the Outlook Shortcut," below.

Adding Outlook to the Quick Launch Bar

The Quick Launch bar appears by default on the taskbar just to the right of the Start menu. Quick Launch, as its name implies, gives you a way to easily and quickly start applications—just click the application’s icon. By default, the Quick Launch bar includes the Show Desktop icon, as well as the Internet Explorer and Outlook Express icons (if Outlook Express is installed). Quick Launch offers easier application launching because you don’t have to navigate the Start menu to start an application.

Adding a shortcut to the Quick Launch bar is easy:

  1. Minimize all windows so that you can see the desktop.
  2. Using the right mouse button, drag the Microsoft Outlook icon to the Quick Launch area of the taskbar and then release it.
  3. Choose Create Shortcut(s) Here.

NOTE:
You can also left-drag the Microsoft Outlook icon to the Quick Launch bar. Windows will inform you that you can’t copy or move the item to that location and will ask whether you want to create a shortcut instead. Click Yes to create the shortcut or No to cancel.

Changing the Outlook Shortcut

Let’s assume that you’ve created a shortcut to Outlook on your Quick Launch bar or in another location so that you can start Outlook quickly. Why change the shortcut? By adding switches to the command that starts Outlook, you can customize the way the application starts and functions for the current session. You can also control Outlook’s startup window state (normal, minimized, maximized) through the shortcut’s properties. For example, you might want Outlook to start automatically when you log on, but you want it to start minimized. In this situation, you would create a shortcut to Outlook in your Startup folder and then modify the shortcut so that Outlook starts minimized.

To change the properties for a shortcut, first locate the shortcut, right-click its icon, and choose Properties. You should see a dialog box similar to the one shown in Figure 1-18.

Figure 1-18.  A typical Properties dialog box for an Outlook shortcut. (Image unavailable)

The following list summarizes the options on the Shortcut tab of the Properties dialog box (some of which do not appear in Windows 9x):

  • Target Type. This read-only property specifies the type for the shortcut’s target, which in the example shown in Figure 1-18 is Application.
  • Target Location. This read-only property specifies the directory location of the target executable.
  • Target. This property specifies the command to execute when the shortcut is executed. The default Outlook command is "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10\Outlook.exe" /recycle. The path could vary if you have installed Office in a different folder. The path to the executable must be enclosed in quotes, and any additional switches must be added to the right, outside the quotes. See "Startup Switches," page 35, to learn about additional switches you can use to start Outlook.
  • Run In Separate Memory Space. This option is selected by default and can’t be changed for Outlook. All 32-bit applications run in a separate memory space. This provides crash protection for other applications and for the operating system.
  • Run As Different User. Select this option to run Outlook in a different user context, which lets you start Outlook with a different user account from the one you used to log on to the computer. Windows will prompt you for the user name and password when you execute the shortcut.

  • TIP:
    You also can use the RUNAS command from a command console (Windows NT and Windows 2000) to start an application in a different user context. For additional information, see the following section, "Use RUNAS to Change User Context."
  • Start In. This property specifies the startup directory for the application.
  • Shortcut Key. Use this property to assign a shortcut key to the shortcut, which will allow you to start Outlook by pressing the key combination. Simply click in the Shortcut Key box and press the keystroke to assign it to the shortcut.
  • Run. Use this property to specify the startup window state for Outlook. You can choose Normal Window, Minimized, or Maximized.
  • Comment. Use this property to specify an optional comment. The comment appears in the shortcut’s ToolTip when you rest the pointer over the shortcut’s icon. For example, if you use the Run As Different User option, you might include mention of that in the Comment box to help you distinguish this shortcut from another that launches Outlook in the default context.
  • Find Target. Click this button to open the folder containing the Outlook.exe executable file.
  • Change Icon. Click this button to change the icon assigned to the shortcut. By default, the icon comes from the Outlook.exe executable, which contains other icons you can assign to the shortcut. You also can use other ICO, EXE, and DLL files to assign icons. You’ll find several additional icons in Moricons.dll and Shell32.dll, both located either in the Windows folder or in the %systemroot%\System32 folder (Windows NT and Windows 2000).

When you’re satisfied with the shortcut’s properties, click OK to close the dialog box.

Use RUNAS to Change User Context

As explained in the preceding section, you can use the option Run As Different User in a shortcut’s Properties dialog box to run the target application in a different user context from the one you used to log on to the system. This option is applicable on systems running Windows NT and Windows 2000 but not on those running Windows 9x or Windows Me.

You can also use the RUNAS command from a command console in Windows NT and Windows 2000 to run a command—including Outlook—in a different user context. The syntax for RUNAS is

RUNAS [/profile] [/env] [/netonly] /user:
<UserName> program

The parameters for RUNAS can be summarized as follows:

  • /profile Use this parameter to indicate the profile for the specified user if that profile needs to be loaded.
  • /env Use the current user environment instead of the one specified by the user’s profile.
  • /netonly Use this parameter if the specified user credentials are for remote access only.
  • /user:<UserName> Use this parameter to specify the user account under which you want the application to be run.
  • Program This parameter specifies the application to execute.

Following is an example of the RUNAS command used to start Outlook in the Administrator context of the domain ADMIN. (Note that the command should be on one line on your screen.):

RUNAS /profile /user:admin\administrator
""C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office
\Office10\Outlook.exe" /recycle"

It might seem like a lot of trouble to type all that at the command prompt, and that’s usually the case. Although you can use RUNAS from the command console to run Outlook in a specific user context, it’s generally more useful to use RUNAS in a batch file to start Outlook in a given, predetermined user context. For example, you might create a batch file containing the sample RUNAS syntax just noted and then create a shortcut to that batch file so that you can execute it easily without having to type the command each time.

Startup Switches

Microsoft Outlook supports a number of command-line switches that modify the way the program starts and functions. Although you can issue the Outlook.exe command with switches from a command prompt, it’s generally more useful to specify switches through a shortcut, particularly if you want to use the same set of switches more than once. Table 1-1 on the next page lists the startup switches you can use to modify the way Outlook starts and functions.

For an explanation of how to modify a shortcut to add command-line switches, see "Changing the Outlook Shortcut," page 32.

Table 1-1. Startup switches and their purposes

Switch Purpose
/a <filename> Open a message form with the attachment specified by <filename>
/c ipm.activity Open the journal entry form by itself
/c ipm.appointment Open the appointment form by itself
/c ipm.contact Open the contact form by itself
/c ipm.note Open the message form by itself
/c ipm.post Open the discussion form by itself
/c ipm.stickynote Open the note form by itself
/c ipm.task Open the task form by itself
/c <class> Create an item using the message class specified by <class>
/CheckClient Perform a check to see whether Outlook is the default application for e-mail, news, and contacts
/CleanFreeBusy Regenerate free/busy schedule data
/CleanReminders Regenerate reminders
/CleanSchedPlus Delete Schedule+ data from the server and enable free/busy data from the Outlook calendar to be used by Schedule+ users
/CleanViews Restore the default Outlook views
/Folder Hide the Outlook Bar and folder list if displayed in the previous session
/NoPreview Hide the preview pane and remove Preview Pane from the View menu
/Profiles Display the Choose Profile dialog box even if Always Use This Profile is selected in profile options
/Profile <name> Automatically use the profile specified by <name>
/Recycle Start Outlook using an existing Outlook window if one exists
/ResetFolders Restore missing folders in the default message store
/ResetOutlookBar Rebuild the Outlook Bar
/select <folder> Display the folder specified by <folder>

Choosing a Startup View

When you start Outlook, it defaults to using Outlook Today view (see Figure 1-19), but you might prefer to use a different view or folder as the initial view. For example, if you use Outlook primarily as an e-mail client, you’ll probably want Outlook to start in the Inbox. If you use Outlook mainly to manage contacts, you’ll probably want it to start in the Contacts folder.

Figure 1-19.  Outlook Today is the default view. (Image unavailable)

To specify the view that should appear when Outlook first starts, follow these steps:

  1. Open Outlook and choose Tools, Options.
  2. Click the Other tab and then click Advanced Options (see Figure 1-20).
  3. Figure 1-20.  Use the Advanced Options dialog box to specify the startup view. (Image unavailable)

  4. From the Startup In This Folder drop-down list, choose the folder you want Outlook to open at startup.
  5. Click OK and then close the dialog box.

If you switch Outlook to a different default folder and then want to restore Outlook Today as your default view, you can follow the previous steps to restore Outlook Today as the default.

Simply select Outlook Today from the drop-down list or follow these steps with the Outlook Today window open:

  1. Open Outlook and open Outlook Today view.
  2. Click Customize Outlook Today at the top of the Outlook Today window.
  3. On the resulting page, select When Starting Go Directly To Outlook Today and then click Save Changes.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2001

    The book to have!

    This book is by far one of the best I've seen on Outlook. It is geared to intermediate to advanced users and covers all the major topics in good detail. I found the chapters on integrating Outlook and Exchange Server particularly useful. There are a lot of great tips on configuring public folders and using advanced features that aren't covered in most of the other books. There is also a nice introduction to programming Outlook applications. If you are an experienced Outlook user or want to get up to speed on managing Outlook installations for Exchange Server, this is the book to have.

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